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Amy Jo Martin

Amy Jo Martin Speaks about Social Communication at NMX 2013

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Amy Jo Martin, author, speaker, founder, CEO of Digital Royalty shares how to tap into your inner renegade and bring innovation into your daily life. She explores how social media gives every human the power to make positive change. We had the pleasure of seeing Amy Jo’s keynote today at NMX 2013. Here are some of the best quotes and stories from her talk:

  • “Humans communicate with humans. Not logos.”

If you aren’t introducing the people behind the brand, you’re missing out on an opportunity to connect with your audience. People don’t respond to the faceless corporate branding that so many are guilty of doing online. They want to talk to individuals. A great example is Dana White (from UFC), whose Twitter blunder turned into constant communication with UFC fans, which has since expanded to all UFC fighters.

  • “The goal to to connect with people who believe what you believe.”

Who is your target audience? It’s a great question to ask before you start marketing online. You want to connect with quality people who really “get” you and your brand, rather than going for quantity.

  • “[Social media] is a dialogue, not a monologue.”

Broadcasting a message just doesn’t work. You have to be social. This makes you instantly more credible, since you’re now an authentic person. A great example of this that Amy Jo gave was Shaquille O’Neal, who created “random acts of Shaq-ness” to prove to Twitter followers that he really was the person tweeting.

  • “Deliver value when, where, and how your audience want to receive it.”

You don’t get to decide where your audience lives online. Find where they hang out instead of using the platforms you want to be using. For example, even if you love Twitter, if your primary target market is more active on Facebook, that’s where you need to be.

  • “Everything is trackable online… everything’s accountable.”

If you aren’t tracking what’s working online, it’s hard to be successful. The good news is that today, there are plenty of ways to track your online efforts, so there’s no excuse to not set this up so you can find out which of your activities are most beneficial.

This just scratches the surface of what Amy Jo spoke about at her keynote. Did you know that all of our keynotes are being live-streamed and archived? Head over to  NMX University to see our keynotes and additional bonus content live from the show.

About Amy Jo:

Amy Jo founded Digital Royalty three years ago to help companies, celebrities, professional sports leagues, teams and athletes build, measure and monetize their digital universe. Clients include: Shaquille O’Neal, FOX Sports, Nike, The X-Factor, Chicago White Sox, UFC, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Los Angeles Kings, Tony Hsieh CEO of Zappos.com and more. In addition, Digital Royalty provides customized social media education programs through Digital Royalty University. Amy and Digital Royalty have been featured in top-tier media outlets including Vanity Fair, TIME, Forbes, The New York Times, Fast Company, ESPN SportsCenter, USA Today, MSNBC and Newsweek.

Amy Jo herself has nearly 1.3 million Twitter followers @AmyJoMartin and she travels the world to speak about the latest trends in social media, how to monetize various social platforms, and how to successfully build a personal brand by utilizing social media.

America’s Tweethearts Story In Vanity Fair Is Good For New Media

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While attending Affiliate Summit West earlier this week Joe Morin asked me if I had read the new Vanity Fair article America’s Tweethearts or Social Media Insider’s reaction to it.  I hadn’t yet but Joe sent me a link to both and after reading them I  of course have some comments.

I liked both the article and the post. Yes the author Vanessa Grigoriadis comes across as clueless to the real benefits of social media and according to one of the comments at Social Media Insider has written this kind of article before. So what?

It’s a valid story. These women (Julia Roy, Sarah Evans, Stefanie Michaels, Amy Jo Martin, Sarah Austin and Felicia Day) deserve the recognition. Despite the reporters snarky tone, Stefanie, Sarah (Austin) and Felicia are in fact entertainers/celebrities intentionally. Good for them! Twitter helps promote their careers and the article is pretty significant evidence of that fact. I don’t think Julia, Amy Jo and Sara (Evans) are complaining about the publicity and how it can and will help their careers either.

Vanity Fair has over a million paid subscribers (thats the latest info I can find) and I am guessing a majority of those readers haven’t tuned into Twitter or social media yet.  No matter what the story says that’s good for all of us folks.

And by the way look what the article did not just for us but to us, people are posting and tweeting all over the place about this story (1645 retweets at the time I post this). Everyone is talking about why its good, and why its bad, how Ms. Grigoriadis is clueless, and how these women are being exploited, or how others deserved to be featured in this article. Welcome to social media folks.

It’s a beautiful thing and regardless of the reporter’s or Vanity Fair’s intent they just advanced our new media revolution a little bit further.

Congratulations to six very deserving women and to all of us.

Am I Crazy? Is this story somehow bad for us?

America's Tweethearts Story In Vanity Fair Is Good For New Media

Author:

While attending Affiliate Summit West earlier this week Joe Morin asked me if I had read the new Vanity Fair article America’s Tweethearts or Social Media Insider’s reaction to it.  I hadn’t yet but Joe sent me a link to both and after reading them I  of course have some comments.

I liked both the article and the post. Yes the author Vanessa Grigoriadis comes across as clueless to the real benefits of social media and according to one of the comments at Social Media Insider has written this kind of article before. So what?

It’s a valid story. These women (Julia Roy, Sarah Evans, Stefanie Michaels, Amy Jo Martin, Sarah Austin and Felicia Day) deserve the recognition. Despite the reporters snarky tone, Stefanie, Sarah (Austin) and Felicia are in fact entertainers/celebrities intentionally. Good for them! Twitter helps promote their careers and the article is pretty significant evidence of that fact. I don’t think Julia, Amy Jo and Sara (Evans) are complaining about the publicity and how it can and will help their careers either.

Vanity Fair has over a million paid subscribers (thats the latest info I can find) and I am guessing a majority of those readers haven’t tuned into Twitter or social media yet.  No matter what the story says that’s good for all of us folks.

And by the way look what the article did not just for us but to us, people are posting and tweeting all over the place about this story (1645 retweets at the time I post this). Everyone is talking about why its good, and why its bad, how Ms. Grigoriadis is clueless, and how these women are being exploited, or how others deserved to be featured in this article. Welcome to social media folks.

It’s a beautiful thing and regardless of the reporter’s or Vanity Fair’s intent they just advanced our new media revolution a little bit further.

Congratulations to six very deserving women and to all of us.

Am I Crazy? Is this story somehow bad for us?

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