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Julien Smith: “Your Environment is Everything”

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julien smith When I was in college, I was very interested in learning about nature versus nurture (i.e. the debate about what is more important: your innate abilities/genetics or your environment/experiences). It was the first time I had stepped outside of my secure, rural community to meet people from all over the world. It was uncomfortable and exciting at the same time.

Nature versus nurture was a topic brought up in my Psychology 101 class, and I began looking at my own life through more refined glasses. What I realized is that certain beliefs and personality traits that I thought were just “who I am” (nature), were more likely a result of the environment in which I was raised (nurture).

Writes Julien Smith, in a blog post on In Over Your Head,

Where you live is not trivial– at all. Your environment is everything for you. It shapes you. It’s made you who you are, from the people you spend time with to the very streets you are driving in and walking on every day.

This can be both good and bad. For example, I consider myself to have an extremely strong work ethic, and I attribute that to the fact that I grew up in a rural farming community where everyone had to work hard just to make ends meet. There, you won’t find a tolerance for laziness. But I also am extremely hard on myself when I  face any kind of failure, large or small, because where I grew up, failure in your career meant no food on the table.

So what does this have to do with content creation or your online business?

I believe, that the same way your physical environment can effect how you interact with the world and what level of success you achieve, so do our virtual environments. As Julien writes, where you live is not trivial, and because we “live” online these days, we need to broaden our horizons a bit to include your online presence in this idea.

Think about the people in your closest circle. Think about the websites you visit the most. Think about the online communities where you choose to interact, and the online communities where you consider yourself a member. Think about how your own content reflects the online environment where you live. Think about how you can step out of this cycle and build new relationships or simply just find refreshing places to hang out online, at least occasionally.

It’s about growth, and about ensuring that you surround yourself with an environment, both online and off, that is aligned with your personal and professional goals.

See Julien Live on the NMX Stage (And Download a Free Session Featuring Him!)

We’re happy to be welcoming Julien to the keynote stage at NMX 2014. If you missed our recent keynoter announcement, you can check it out in full here.

To go along with this announcement, we’re giving away past sessions featuring our keynoters, including Julien. Download these sessions now while they’re still available!

023 The Podcast Report – Gearing Up For NMX 2014

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PodcastReport-150 Hey everyone it is time for a new season of The Podcast Report. I plan to bring you a new episode of the Podcast Report on the 1st and 15th of each month leading up to NMX 2014 in an effort to keep you up to date with what is happening with the Podcasting Track of New Media Expo.

In this episode, I introduce my new co-host for The Podcast Report, Erik J. Fisher. Erik and I have been podcasting together going back as far as 2006 and I am delighted to have him help me share with you all the exciting reasons why you don’t want to miss NMX 2014.

 
 
What’s So Exciting About NMX?
Erik and I both give the reasons why we are excited about attending NMX and we also share audio clips of what other attendees have to say about what they love most about the conference.

We are very much looking forward to helping you get prepared for another amazing NMX Podcasting Track.

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6 Ways Stories Make Your Podcast Powerful

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Stories make your podcast powerful The art of storytelling can be powerful. A story can pass life lessons from one generation to another. Tales can help people remember information. Stories bring words to life.

There have been thousands of great storytellers throughout time. You don’t need to be Chaucer or one of the Brothers Grimm to use stories to make your content come alive. Use stories wherever possible, and your information will become engaging and entertaining. It will also be memorable.

Here are six ways stories help the information in your podcast become powerful, engaging content:

A Land Far, Far Away

Stories help your listener escape his everyday life. A tale that is told well will transport your listener to another place and time through their imagination. You help them forget their problems.

When you tell stories in your podcast, you give your listener hope. Tales of success help your listener see what is possible. Tragic stories make him thankful for what he has. Stories that simply make your listener think help her better understand something.

Stories that contain wonderful, vivid words create fantastic pictures in the mind of your listener. When your listeners are intently focused on your story, they forgets they are listening to a podcast. They are so engrossed by your story, everything around them disappears. Your content becomes their sole focus.

Hey, I Know You

People trust people they know. If you’re selling a product or service, people buy from people they trust. If you hope to make that sale, you need to create strong, meaningful relationships with your audience. Stories will help you develop those powerful relationships.

When you tell stories about yourself and your experiences, you reveal things about yourself. Revelation is a natural part of storytelling. Self-revelation allows your listener to get to know you. Your listener spends time with you every week as you tell him more and more about yourself. Then, even if you have never met him, your listener feels like he has known you for years. You’re building a relationship without ever meeting. Stories of self-revelation help those friendships develop.

Humanity

Stories can be compelling, humorous, tragic. A great narrative will make your audience marvel, laugh, or better understand something. These strong feelings make you human.

When you evoke emotions in your audience, your listeners feels like you are just like them. Your stories reveal real-life experiences. You are telling your audience that you’ve had similar things happen in your life. They can relate.

I Remember That

The Grimm Fairy Tales are so memorable, because they are lessons disguised as wonderful stories. Over 200 lessons were included in the books from the Brothers Grimm. Cinderella, Rapunzel, and Hansel and Gretel are all stories that are remembered well nearly 200 years after they were written. Stories link words to pictures in order to make the words memorable.

Great stories will make your information memorable as well. Use the tale of your latest saga to make your point. It will help your listener remember your content.

Live Vicariously

Your listeners can live vicariously through you when you tell them a great story. If you tell you listeners how you made a fortune with your information, they get to experience your joy almost as if they made the fortune right along with you. Your words help create the imagery in their minds.

Help people dream. Create fantastic stories that people can see in their own theater of the mind. Paint great pictures with your words. Your listeners will see your story in their heads.

Stories allow your listeners to feel they joy without experiencing the risk. Your audience can walk through your hardships and feel the elation as you survive without actually living the pain. Delightful stories entertain listeners, because they can experience so much in a short period of time through you.

Take a Car Ride

Your podcast is 30 minutes long (or maybe even longer). That’s quite a bit of time to spend with someone. Will your listener want to spend 30 minutes in a car with you each week? When you record a podcast, you are asking them to do just that.

Your listener will spend meaningful, personal time with you each week. You better do all you can to create a strong relationship with your audience. Get listeners to like you.

When you reveal things about yourself through your stories, people will decide if they like you or not. Be real. Don’t force your story or change the details simply to make people like you. Tell the truth. If you bend the truth this time, you may forget next time. The truth will always come out. When it does, your relationship will be tarnished for good.

Reveal the truth. People will see you as a real human being. They will get to like you for who you are, flaws and all. The friendship will develop. Next thing you know, you’ll be taking a 30-minute car ride with them every week. Stories can make that happen.

Stories are powerful tools. They help your audience escape their problems. Anecdotes help your listener get to know you. That’s where relationships begin. Your tales will show you are human. You are a real person with real flaws, just like your listener. Stories will make your information memorable, by drawing pictures in the mind of your listener. Your audience can live vicariously through you when you tell them about your experiences. When you create that friendship, your listener will be willing to take that 30-minute car ride with you every week.

Begin creating great stories today, and make your podcast powerful.

Coming to the NMX 2014 Stage… (Our Biggest Podcasting Announcement Ever!)

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It’s Podcast-a-Palooza here at NMX this week! Our Director of Podcasting, Cliff Ravenscraft, has been hard at work preparing for NMX 2014, and the Podcasting Track is on track to be even better than last year, if that is possible.

And for THIS WEEK ONLY we’re giving away NMX 2014 discount code specifically for podcasters and podcast fans. Use PODCAST20 right now to save 20% on your ticket. Register now >

Welcome to 20+ Amazing Podcasting Speakers

Today, we’re happy to make our biggest podcasting announcement EVER! Starting with a huge group of speakers you’ll see if you attend the podcasting track sessions at NMX 2014! (And announcing speakers is just a start…keep reading for even more podcasty goodness!)

podcasting track group 1

Woah, mama, that’s a lot of speakers! Here’s a little more about them:

  • Kenn Blanchard is a former pastor and a gun rights activist who has been podcasting since 2007.
  • Jason Casbassi’s “The Walking Dead ‘Cast” is the the #1 Walking Dead podcast out there. It’s fueled by passion, enthusiasm, and braaaaaaaaaains.
  • Rob Cesterino was a contestant on Survivor and now podcasts about it.
  • Chris Christenson is a top travel podcaster who’s doing both video and audio podcasting.
  • Darrell Darnell began podcasting about Fringe in 2008 and hasn’t looked back. He is now involved in several other fan podcasts as well.
  • Erik Fisher’s podcasting, social media and productivity passions come together on his “Beyond the To-Do List” podcast.
  • John Dumas hosts “EntrepreneurOnFire” – and we think he’s on fire too!
  • Jared Easley teaches others how to manage their fear with his “Starve the Doubts” podcast.
  • Pat Flynn started as a blogger, and now has evolved into a successful podcaster as well. Is there anything this man can’t do? We think not!
  • Jeremy Frandsen and Jason Van Orden are a double threat. They co-host Internet Business Mastery, the #1 podcast on Internet marketing since 2005.
  • Rob Greenlee began “WebTalk World Radio Show” in 1999 and turned it into a podcast back in 2004, making him one of them most experience podcasters in the world.
  • Dave Hamilton, the host of “Mac Geek Gab Podcast,” is your go-to guy for anything Mac.
  • Dave Jackson from “School of Podcasting” is the first person to podcast about podcasting.
  • Daniel J. Lewis hosts an entire network of podcasts, on everything from Once Upon a Time to using Audacity.
  • Rick Mulready’s  Inside Social Media podcast features social leaders from some of the biggest brands in the world.
  • Amy Porterfield is a Facebook expert and no stranger to the NMX stage. Did you know she’s a podcaster now too?
  • Cliff Ravenscraft never disappoints with his sessions…which is why he’s now the NMX Director of Podcasting.
  • Mike and Izabela Russell own the audio production company Music Radio Creative which now serves customers in over 77 different countries.
  • Scott Stratten was named one of the top 5 social media influencers in the world by Forbes.com. 
  • Jaime Tardy  has interviewed 100 millionaires on her show “Eventual Millionaire.”
  • Rob Walch is Vice President of Podcaster Relations for Libsyn and the founder of podCast411. Podcasting for Dummies lists him as one of the top five most influential persons in podcasting

Whew, what a list! You can see more about all of the podcasting speakers, as well as other speakers we’ve announced, on our 2014 Speaker Page. Or, head to our Podcasting Page to see just podcasting speakers and other information about that track.

cliff on stage

What You’ll Learn in the 2014 Podcasting Track

And if that wasn’t a big enough announcement for you, we’re also announcing some of the sessions titles you’ll find in our NMX 2014 Podcasting Track! If names don’t impress you as much as actual session topics, here’s a list of just some of the educational sessions and panels you’ll be able to attend:

  • Audio Branding: Ways to Improve Your Podcast “Brand” with the Use of carefully Scripted Jingles & Voice Overs (Beginner)
  • The Power of Niche Podcasting – Three Reasons You Should Narrowly Focus On One Topic (Beginner)
  • How Do I Record My Podcast So I Can Sound Good All The Time? (Intermediate)
  • Why Podcasting if We’re Already Broadcasting? Social media/blogging addicts reveal why they started podcasts (Intermediate)
  • How Not To Screw Up Your Podcast Interviews – Tips On Creating Interviews That Will Increase Your Credibility (Intermediate)
  • Podcasting Profits: How to Use Your Podcast to Generate Income (Intermediate)
  • Building A Successful Fan Podcast Devoted to Your Favorite TV Show, Movie or Book Series (Intermediate)
  • Guaranteed To Stand Out – Authenticity And Transparency Behind The Microphone (Intermediate)
  • How To Land The Expert Interviews You Want For Your Podcast (Intermediate)
  • How To Audio Podcast 100% from an iPad or iPhone (Advanced)
  • From No Online Presence To Six Figure Income Within Six Months. A Podcasting Success Story (Advanced)
  • The State of Podcasting For 2014 (Advanced)

You can learn more about all of these sessions/panels on our Podcasting Page. We’ll be adding even more sessions and speakers over the next few weeks.

podcasting awards The Return of the Podcasing Awards!

Last year, Todd Cochrane brought his Podcast Awards to NMX, and it was a smashing success, with so many podcasters and fans attending that we ran out of seats and people were standing along the walls! We’re happy to announce that the Podcast Awards are coming back. We hope to see you at the 9th Annual Podcast Awards, which are open to all NMX attendees.

Mark your calendars – nominations for these awards open on October 1. Want an email reminder? Click here.

podcasting at nmx The Return of the Podcasting Pavilion!

NMX 2013 was also home to the “Podcasting Pavilion,” where podcasting speakers and attendees could broadcast live from the exhibit hall floor. It was extremely popular, so we’re bringing it back for NMX 2014.

Interested in learning more about podcasting live from NMX 2014? Click here.

Here at NMX, we’re committed to bringing programming, networking opportunities, and recognition to podcasters. How are we doing? Leave a comment – we’re love to hear from you!

Your Podcasting Ticket to the Show: Here’s a Discount

Of course, if you haven’t already, there’s no time like the present! You need to register for a pass in order to attend our keynotes, sessions, networking parties, and the Podcasting Awards. For this week only, we’re offering a discount code specifically for podcasters and podcast fans.

Use PODCAST20 to save 20% on your ticket to NMX 2014.

So what are you waiting for? Register today!

How to Score a Killer Guest for Your Podcast

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podcasting at nmx We all know that a podcast is a great way to promote your brand. The sound of your voice allows an audience to really connect, your personality is conveyed and arguably, your message is absorbed that much easier.

Those committed to producing a quality podcast understand the urgency to stay relevant and fresh. The only way to keep and build an audience is to pay them back with new insights and perhaps even different perspectives. One way to achieve this is by hosting a guest on your podcast. The question now is, how?

Find the Win-Win

It is not necessarily hard to pick out your podcast’s dream guest.  This first step should be quite easy for you as ideal guests have something obvious and substantial to add to your podcast’s overall conversation.  Now, how can you turn that feeling into something mutual?  Provide a win-win.

Whether you are pitching a PR manager or your guest directly, keep the main focus of your request on the benefits for them. An audience-reach of X, which falls into the demographic of Y, and includes people who are desperate to learn more about your Z.  Also, see if you can find out the current happenings of your guest’s career (i.e. do they have a blog, did they just come out with a new book, etc.?) and detail how you would plan to cross promote.

(Editor’s note: check out this post on getting past the gatekeepers when you’re working with high-level, popular guests.)

Explain Why Your Audience Is Their Audience

Your invitation is your chance to pitch, so you’ve got to really sell your podcast if you want to land that special guest.  Be sure not to assume that your guest-in-mind has even heard of your podcast.  With this in mind, position your pitch to display your attitude and exemplify your unique voice; this is your chance to let them know what you’re all about.

Another great selling point is if you can mention guests that you’ve hosted the past.  This will help your invitation holder better understand any commonalities between each of your brands.

Whether you have a past to promote or not, be upfront and genuine about your intentions. I admire your contribution to our industry and I know my audience would be thrilled to learn more about your upcoming work and opinions on…

Give Them a Head’s Up on The Discussion

At this point there’s a chance that you’ve peeked your potential guest’s interest.  Push them over the edge by giving them a heads-up.  Attach a list of sample questions/discussion topics you’d hope to explore. This way your guest can get a feel for your style and the types of discussions at hand.

Express your flexibility in terms of working around their issues or necessary demands.  The beauty of a podcast is that everything can be done digitally, so don’t let distance or schedule constraints hold you back.  Close your invitation with a link to your proudest podcast to date.  When trying to reel the best in, in only makes sense to provide the tastiest bait.

What tips do you have for scoring a killer guest for your podcast? Share with a comment below.

9 Brilliant Bloggers Talk About Video Podcasting

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Brilliant Bloggers is a bi-weekly series here at NMX where we look at the best posts from around the web all surrounding a specific topic. Every other week, we’ll feature a brilliant blogger, along with a huge list of more resources where you can learn about the topic. You can see more Brilliant Blogger posts or learn how to submit your link for an upcoming edition here.

This Week’s Topic: Video Podcasting

Lots of people are blogging. More and more people are podcasting. But video? There are still relatively few people consistently producing quality video content. If you’re already a podcaster or thinking about starting a podcast, consider a video element. Video podcasting isn’t much different from audio podcasting, and adding this visual element can open you to a world of new listeners.

We covered video podcasting in the past on this blog after Perry Lawrence presented a session on this topic at one of our past events. But for even more knowledge, check out what the brilliant bloggers (and podcasters) below have to say about video podcasting.

Brilliant Blogger of the Week:

ryan matthew Five Tips for Professional Video Podcasting by Ryan Matthew Pierson

I like this post because it is a great overview of video podcasting for beginners, and also includes some tips for more experienced podcasters.

He writes, “After seeing several professional YouTube talents hit the big time, you may have considered creating your own video podcast (or vlog) in an effort to stake your own claim in the world of Internet television. You may have a brilliant concept and have tried your hand at shooting video and editing. You’re pretty set, right?” Ryan then goes on to cover tips you may not have previously considered, such has working with a co-host and hiring an editor.

Check out the post, then don’t forget to follow Ryan on Twitter at @FrugalGeek.

Even More Brilliant Advice:

Did I miss your post or a post by someone you know about video podcasting? Unintentional! Help me out by leaving a comment below with the link.

Next Brilliant Blogger Topic: Writing Persuasive Content

I’d love to include a link to your post in our next installment– and if you head to the Brilliant Bloggers Schedule, you can see even more upcoming posts. We all have something to learn from one another, so please don’t be shy! Head to the schedule today to learn how to submit your post so I won’t miss it.

15 Tips to Make Your Podcast Guests Feel Special

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star I’ve been a guest on several podcasts. Sometimes, I feel like the red carpet is rolled out. Other times…not so much. It doesn’t matter if your guest is an a-lister celebrity or a total newbie. They’re giving up their valuable time to be on your podcast; they deserve special treatment. A guest who feels special will be a lifelong fan. One who feels like an afterthought is probably not going to help promote your podcast, and they might even speak to others about how they’ve been treated poorly.

So the next time you have a guest on your podcast, go the extra mile. Make them feel like a star! Here are 15 tips to help you make them feel special:

  • Do your research.

This one seems like a no-brainer, but you’d be amazed at how some bloggers don’t do it. I was once on a podcast where it was very clear that the podcaster didn’t know much about my blogs or what I do. I felt like I wasn’t important enough for this podcaster to research anything about me, and feeling unimportant stinks. So become James Lipton for a hot minute and be thorough when researching your guest.

  • Offer to meet via Skype first.

Not every guest has time to meet with you via Skype before you record, but you can at least offer it. This is especially great for guests who aren’t on podcasts often and are feeling nervous about recording.

  • Follow them on social media.

Nothing says, “I don’t care about you” more than not following your guests on Twitter, Facebook, and other social networks.

  • Work on your intro skills.

How you introduce your guest makes all the difference, and a lot of podcasters get this wrong. Don’t say, “I’ll let so-and-so tell you more about him/herself.” Like doing no research, it makes your guest feel like you don’t care who they are. Think about what you’re going to say about your guest as an intro and even practice it a few times. Don’t wing it.

  • Compliment without blowing smoke.

To continue with the last point, during your intro and throughout the episode, compliment your guest. Don’t blow smoke (people know when you’re being insincere), but definitely let all of your guests know that you’re impressed by their skills or accomplishments.

  • Ask how you can help.

Before you start, ask your guest how you can best help them at the moment. When researching your guest, you should get to know their various projects, but some people (most people) have a lot going on. Would they rather you focus on the work they’re doing at their full time job? Are they trying to promote personal blogs or other projects? Do you wish you’d help them gain more social followers? What do they have coming up in the future that you can promote? Ask your guest what their goals are so you can help him/her accomplish them.

  • Don’t rush.

It is important to be considerate of your guests’ time. However, if you’re rushing the spot, it can make them feel unimportant. Once, I was on a podcast where episodes were typically 30-45 minutes, and some were even 60 minutes. My episode was only 20 minutes. It made me feel like the host didn’t think I was important enough for a full episode. So don’t rush it! When you ask someone to be your guest, talk about the time commitment so they are aware, and then use that time.

  • Ask for advice.

It’s flattering when someone values my opinion enough to ask for advice. So, when you have a guest on your podcast, ask for it!

  • Ask for future guest recommendations.

Along the same lines, you can also ask guests for recommendations for other guests. You’ll want to do this after you’re done recording, not on the show.

  • Share some “insider” information.

It always makes people feel important when they know something other people don’t know. What small piece of “insider information” can you share? Of course, you can’t trust every guest to keep his/her mouth shut, so be discerning in what you share, but even little things no one else knows yet, like who your next guest is, can make your current guest feel important.

  • Make time for your guests on their schedule.

It’s off-putting when someone invites me to be on their podcast and then tells me a time I need to be there. Unless it’s a live show, you should schedule recording at a time that is convenient for your guest, rather than demanding they work around your schedule.

  • Schedule content promotion.

Give the episode some special promotion, but also schedule some time to promote other things the guest is doing as well. DO they have their own podcast? Do they write a blog? Are they launching a book? Give your guest some social shout-outs outside of just promoting your own podcast.

  • Support your guests’ projects.

Along the same lines, take a little time to support your guests’ projects. Beyond social promotion, take time to attend a live webinar they’re doing, buy their product, etc.

  • Connect your guests with others.

Relationships are powerful. Think about who might help your guests reach their goals. Can you connect these people? Don’t be too pushy, but when relevant, make email introductions that are beneficial to both parties. It makes people feel very special that you think of them and want to help them.

  • Say thank you.

Lastly, say thank you. Not just after the podcast recording is done, either. Send a special email or even a $5 giftcard on Facebook with a note. If you have the person’s home address, a handwritten card is even better. A little thank you can go a long way.

How do you make your podcast guests feel special? Leave a comment with your tips!

 Image Credit: Bigstock

17 Brilliant Bloggers Talk About Hosting Webinars

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Brilliant Bloggers is a bi-weekly series here at NMX where we look at the best posts from around the web all surrounding a specific topic. Every other week, we’ll feature a brilliant blogger, along with a huge list of more resources where you can learn about the topic. You can see more Brilliant Blogger posts or learn how to submit your link for an upcoming edition here.

This Week’s Topic: Hosting Webinars

When people talk about content marketing, they typically mean blogging, podcasting, video, ebook publication, and social curation. However, content marketing is really any kind of free informational or entertaining resource you give away in order to highlight your own skills and products/services. It’s selling without really selling.

One often-overlooked form of content marketing is the free webinar. Webinars can be recorded or live, but in both cases, they are an online presentation or class given at a specific time, usually in order to capture leads (i.e. people have to give you their email address and other information to attend).

This week’s Brilliant Bloggers is all about the art of hosting a great webinar. They can be a lot of work if you do them well, but the reward is great, since they can attract thousands of attendees without you having to plan a live event. And lest you think webinars are only for business, you can also consider hosting one if your a blogger or podcaster, as they can drive traffic and help you become known as an expert in your field. You can even sell access to a webinar as a way of monetizing.

Brilliant Blogger of the Week:

aliza sherman by Aliza Sherman

Some webinars I attend are great, but I identify with this post by Aliza Sherman because most of the webinars I’ve attended are pretty horrible. What separates the good from the bad?

Aliza outlines several tips in this post that can help you ensure your posts are beneficial, not a chore for people to attend. If your webinars are good, they can solidify you as an expert, promote your products/services, and help you capture leads, so definitely check out her tips before you host your next webinar! (And don’t forget to follow Aliza on Twitter at @alizasherman.)

Even More Brilliant Advice:

  1. 6 Tips for Hosting a Successful Webinar by Sharon Dunigan
  2. 8 Ways To Boost Your Business With Webinars by Lewis Howes (@LewisHowes)
  3. 10 Steps for Planning a Successful Webinar by Chris Peters and Kami Griffiths (@TechSoup)
  4. 18 Tips on How To Conduct an Engaging Webinar by Olivia Mitchell (@OliviaMitchell)
  5. A Five-Step Process for Hosting a Webinar That Generates Sales by Greg Digneo (@GregDigneo)
  6. Be the Webinar Host with the Most – 4 Tips! by Jill Bastian (@jillieb3)
  7. Hosting A Webinar – Equipment You’ll Need by David Crawford
  8. How to Host a Great Webinar in 6 Easy Steps by Dan Taylor (@mountaindan)
  9. How to Host a Successful Webinar by Kelly Noble (@Stellar247) and Paul Serwin (@LeverageSuccess)
  10. How to Host a Webinar by Marketing Zone (@marketingzone_)
  11. How to Setup and Promote Your First Webinar by Ellie Mirman (@ellieeille)
  12. Public Speaking Tips for Webinars by Patricia Fripp (@pfripp)
  13. Running a Successful Webinar: 10 Presentation Commandments by Deborah Sweeney (@deborahsweeney)
  14. Seven Tips for Hosting Webinars that Rock by Carol Tice (@TiceWrites)
  15. The Advantages of Hosting a Webinar by Marissa Buie (@marBuie)
  16. Which is the One ‘Free Meeting Webinar Service’ to Rule Them All by Natalie Sisson (@suitcasepreneur)

Did I miss your post or a post by someone you know about hosting webinars? Unintentional! Help me out by leaving a comment below with the link.

Next Brilliant Blogger Topic: Video Podcasting

I’d love to include a link to your post in our next installment– and if you head to the Brilliant Bloggers Schedule, you can see even more upcoming posts. We all have something to learn from one another, so please don’t be shy! Head to the schedule today to learn how to submit your post so I won’t miss it.

How to Submit Your New Podcast to iTunes

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One of the most important things you can do as a new podcaster is submit your show to iTunes. If you, like me, are new to podcasting, however, you might not know where to go in the iTunes stores to get your podcast listed.

Luckily, one of our past speakers, Ray Ortega, breaks it down into a step-by-step process in this video:

[youtube width=”560″ height=”315″]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXc7WCq_25c[/youtube]

Here are some further resources to help you to begin podcasting and get started setting up your podcast feed:

If you’re interested in even more podcasting information, you should also check out our free ebook on the topic:

becoming a podcaster

Please, Stop Talking: How to Better Interview Your Podcast Guests

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better podcast interviews

Please, stop talking.

Have you ever had a personal crutch or cliché that you used more often than you thought? It may have been something you didn’t realize until somebody brought it to your attention. Have you ever said, “Wow! I had no idea I did that all the time”? I’m here to tell you to stop it.

A good coach will tell you what you need to hear rather than what you want to hear. You need to hear this. When you are interviewing anyone on your show, stop talking. Ask the question, then get out of the way. Let your guest shine.

Here is an example. This is a recent question I heard during an interview.

Host: “Doesn’t money just really make you more of who you already were? It’s like money affords your personality to flourish, right? If you’re loving and generous and then you become wealthy, you’re going to be able to express more of that love and generosity to a greater degree. If you’re a jerk and you become wealthy, you’re just going to become become a colossal jerk. So, isn’t it really just an expansion of who you were at the core anyway? I mean, it’s not the money’s fault. It’s basically just a magnifier of it.”

Guest: “And it’s … that’s a good way of putting it. It just amplifies who you are, and makes it more apparent. It has a greater impact. Yeah, absolutely.”

This host kept talking to the point that he answered his own question. The guest had nothing left to say. The guest tried to paraphrase the same thing the host said, but couldn’t even make that happen. The host made his own point. The host’s question was seven sentences. The guest’s answer was basically, “Yeah.”

There are three points to remember when interviewing guests. If you keep these in mind, your guests will feel great about being on your show, and you will look like a brilliant host. Just stay out of your own way.

1. Know the Answer

Your job is to make your guest look great. You have invited your guest to your show to provide something you couldn’t provide alone. They have a story to tell. It is your job to help them tell it. Lead them to the punchline, climax or conclusion.

You need to do your homework prior to the interview. You need to know what makes your guest interesting. What will make your guest engaging to your audience? Find that story, and help your guest bring it to life.

The story will have a conclusion that you should already know. You’ve done your homework. You know what happens at the end. It is an art to help your guest tell that story without telling it yourself.

Prior to their appearance on the show, guests on The Late Show with David Letterman are interviewed ahead of time by a show producer. It is that producer’s job to find the interesting story. If the producer discovers the guest was recently stuck on a roller coaster during a family vacation, Dave will tee it up. He will help his guest shine by asking, “How’s the family? Have you had time to get away with them lately?” Suddenly, the guest is off and running telling the hilarious story of the roller coaster.

It looks like Dave got lucky. Dave just happened to stumble across a great vacation story. Reality is homework. Dave already knew what would make a great story. His homework (or that of his producer) revealed the gold. He simply helped his guest get there.

Our host above knew the answer to his question. It was obvious by the lengthy set up. Unfortunately, he proved it rather than letting his guest flourish. The host could have simply asked, “Doesn’t money just really make you more of who you already were?” The guest would have been off to the races. The guest could have really explored that theory. The host would have looked like he has great questions. The guest would have looked like he knows his stuff. Everybody wins. Instead, we get, “Yeah, exactly.”

Know the answer, so you can let your guest shine.

2. Be Brief

Make your questions brief. If you want to make your guests look great, you need to give them room to spread their wings. Short questions will allow that to happen.

Ask your short question, then stop talking. If you are talking, your guest is not. Your listeners have come to hear your guest. Let the guest talk. If your listeners have come to hear you, your guest isn’t necessary. Stop wasting everybody’s time.

Many hosts feel the need to prove how much they know. Hosts want to display all of their knowledge to impress the guest. Unfortunately, this is a myth. By showing how much you know, you are only trumping your guest. If you appear to be the most knowledgable person on the show, your guest will feel uncomfortable. You will soon find it hard to get guests.

When you ask brief questions that make it easy for your guest to tell great stories, your guest will look like a star. He will truly enjoy being part of your show. Your guests will want to return. Word will spread. Your show will grow. Finally, your audience will love the new information and engaging stories.

Everybody wins when you talk less.

3. No Yes/No

Ask open-ended questions. When you ask questions that can be answered with “yes” or “no”, some guests will take the opportunity to answer “yes” or “no”. Your interview will go nowhere.

Yes/no questions make it difficult for your guest to elaborate. When your guests tell stories, they become engaging. Stories are easy for your guest. Stories have natural flow. Elaborations take a lot of thought. Make it easy for your guest.

Our host above started with, “Doesn’t money just really make you more of who you already were?” All of a sudden he is faced with a yes/no question. He has forced his guest to elaborate. In order to help his guest, he continues with another yes/no question. In fact, he follows with two additional yes/no questions. Suddenly, his guest has nothing left to say.

The host knows that money simply makes you more of who you already are. He could have positioned his guest with, “How does money affect the core beliefs of an individual?” With that short question, the guest is now able to expound with his “more of who you already are” theory. The guest looks great. The host looks brilliant by somehow knowing that money affect the core of individuals. The listener gets to hear a great story.

Everybody wins when you stop talking.

It is your job to make your guest the star.

That is the reason you’ve invited her to your podcast. She offers something to the show that you cannot deliver as well by yourself. Let her do it. Lob that ball to your guest, so they can hit it out of the park. You don’t need to prove how well you can pitch. The goal is to let your guest hit home runs.

Make your guest look great. She will love you for it. Your listener will love you for it. You will learn to love yourself for it when your podcast begins to flourish.

Ask the question, then get out of the way. Please, stop talking.

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