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Blogosphere Roundup – May 14

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I pulled together some interesting blog posts and news regarding blogging and social media – all released this week.

Daily Blogging Tips: Buying a Blog
Guest blogger Adam Diver talks about starting his own blog and having purchased an established blog – with each option having their own advantages. The experience of both sites allowed him to reflect on some of the issues bloggers may encounter with both types of blogs, particularly when starting up.
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Mashable: Get the Most Out of Offline Networking Events
Learn how to optimize your networking – online and offline.
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ProBlogger: If You Had Only One Month Left to Blog….
If you had only one month left before you had to stop doing it or making money from it – how would that impact your blogging?
[ReadMore]

ReadWriteWeb: Twitter Is Not a Very Social Network
Only 22% of all connections on Twitter are reciprocal. Not very social, is it?
[Read More]

TechCrunch: Facebook And Twitter Are On A Collision Course. And We’re In The Middle.
Twitter and Facebook are becoming more like one another, learn how – with some gratuitous Lost characters thrown in 🙂
[Read More]

Nikki Katz is the Managing Editor for the BlogWorld Blog. Feel free to follow her Twitter @nikki_blogworld and @katzni

Image Credit: SXC

The Importance of Pages Per Visit & Tips For Improving Your PPV

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Readers come and readers go, but do you ever take a look at your pages per visit? That handy information is available in most analytics software and documents the average number of pages per visit to your site before someone heads off elsewhere in search of different content.

Business Model:
For most blogs, your goal is to obtain readership, build a community, and perhaps make a buck or two. If that’s the case, you want to have a high PPV. However, there are some business models that prefer a lower PPV – a customer service organization perhaps (they’re hoping you find your information quickly and get back to using their product!)

Importance of Pages Per Visit:

Your PPV tells you whether your content is compelling enough to stick around and how easy it is to navigate your website. The average blog pages per visit is said to be <2 (for reference), but it never hurts to try to rise above this. How to Increase Your Pages Per Visit:
Because the PPV number is directly related to navigation – your navigational elements need to be extremely clear and concise. If a reader can’t follow your category structure, they’re bound to bounce out after reading the one page they landed on. Here are some other ways to keep someone on your site:

  • Use the “More” tag on your index page. This will push readers to go to a second page to finish reading the article, view multimedia elements, etc.
  • Add “Related Posts” at the bottom. This quickly allows readers to find related content when they are finished reading your post. There are several WordPress plugins that do this automatically!
  • Hotlink your keywords. By hotlinking keywords and categories within your post, users can quickly navigate to find pages full of content related to their interests.
  • Incorporate search functionality. Make sure your search works, and works well!
  • Highlight popular and most recent posts. You can easily incorporate plugins in your sidebar that will pull in the posts with the most comments, the highest pageviews, or your most recent posts. This allows a user to quickly navigate to a post that is of interest, and allows them to join in the discussion.

Nikki Katz is the Managing Editor for the BlogWorld Blog. Feel free to follow her Twitter @nikki_blogworld and @katzni

Image Credit: SXC

What’s the Difference Between Tags & Categories?

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You’re writing your blog post and getting ready to upload it. Then all of a sudden you have to assign it to a category. And a tag. So what’s the difference?

WordPress used to only offer a Category option. It was a way to assign your post to a group, that could then be sorted and helped navigation across your blog. You could have parent categories and child categories for drilling down. As you can imagine, depending on your blog topic, the category structure could get very lengthy and out of hand.

So then tags were implemented. Instead of choosing from your category list, you write your tags out (separated by commas). Tags can be a stream of words or phrases and are not limited by your category or theme design. But in order to work, they need to be consistent. The point of a tag is to literally “tag” your post with some keywords/phrases so that a user can navigate to other posts that are tagged in a similar fashion.

Tags and categories are very similar. They both create pages of posts on your site. They can have long or short names depending on your blog design. They both are used for organization and cross-linking within your blog. But there are a few differences as well:

  • Every blog post HAS to be assigned a category. It does not need to be assigned a tag. That’s a requirement of WordPress. Even if your post is “Uncategorized” – that is still a category.
  • Categories are a hierarchical structure. Tags are not.

Depending on how a blogger uses categories and tags, there can be other differences as well. Some blog pros say that you should only assign your post to one category, and then use tags to further define the post (I disagree). Others feel that you can use a tag once across the blog, because its use is to only further define your post (I disagree).

No matter what your method is for categorizing your posts, my suggestion is to stay consistent and hotlink your keywords frequently. Whether you link your words/phrases to a tag or a category, is your decision!

Nikki Katz is the Managing Editor for the BlogWorld Blog. Feel free to follow her Twitter @nikki_blogworld and @katzni

Image Thanks to Wordle.net

What's the Difference Between Tags & Categories?

Author:

You’re writing your blog post and getting ready to upload it. Then all of a sudden you have to assign it to a category. And a tag. So what’s the difference?

WordPress used to only offer a Category option. It was a way to assign your post to a group, that could then be sorted and helped navigation across your blog. You could have parent categories and child categories for drilling down. As you can imagine, depending on your blog topic, the category structure could get very lengthy and out of hand.

So then tags were implemented. Instead of choosing from your category list, you write your tags out (separated by commas). Tags can be a stream of words or phrases and are not limited by your category or theme design. But in order to work, they need to be consistent. The point of a tag is to literally “tag” your post with some keywords/phrases so that a user can navigate to other posts that are tagged in a similar fashion.

Tags and categories are very similar. They both create pages of posts on your site. They can have long or short names depending on your blog design. They both are used for organization and cross-linking within your blog. But there are a few differences as well:

  • Every blog post HAS to be assigned a category. It does not need to be assigned a tag. That’s a requirement of WordPress. Even if your post is “Uncategorized” – that is still a category.
  • Categories are a hierarchical structure. Tags are not.

Depending on how a blogger uses categories and tags, there can be other differences as well. Some blog pros say that you should only assign your post to one category, and then use tags to further define the post (I disagree). Others feel that you can use a tag once across the blog, because its use is to only further define your post (I disagree).

No matter what your method is for categorizing your posts, my suggestion is to stay consistent and hotlink your keywords frequently. Whether you link your words/phrases to a tag or a category, is your decision!

Nikki Katz is the Managing Editor for the BlogWorld Blog. Feel free to follow her Twitter @nikki_blogworld and @katzni

Image Thanks to Wordle.net

Five Ways to Keep Up with all this New Media Crap

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So, if you’re reading this, you’re likely a blogger. The idea of a blog probably sounded pretty good when you started – the freedom and flexibility of a low cost publishing platform, whether to promote yourself, your businesses, or maybe you’re paid to blog and promote someone else’s businesses.

But now, you need to Tweet your posts, Retweet other people‚s posts, cultivate your Facebook Fan page, add your photos on the Flickr, submit your posts to Stumbleupon and Digg, record YouTube videos, and comment on other blogs. It’s not smelling like roses anymore, is it? Well, here are a few tips and suggestions for keeping up with all this new media crap (tongue-in-cheek).

Batch Your Work. Productivity gurus have long since said that batching your work is more efficient, and it is true. I use Hootsuite to spend 15 minutes every Monday and setup interesting tweets and Facebook updates for the week. Just like you sit down to read the newspaper, I sit down and go through my RSS feeds and pull out things of interest to others. Batching doesn’t hurt anybody and in fact offers you the opportunity to send out updates at a time more convenient for readers in another time zone than you.

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