Looking for Something?
Browsing Category

Blogging

Top Ten Ways to Draw Readers To Your Blog

Author:

Jane Boursaw

One of the most fun things about blogging is drawing readers to your site and creating a sense of community on your blog. There’s no secret formula to this. It mainly involves following a few simple guidelines that will bring readers to your blog and keep them coming back for more. Here are my top ten ways to do this.

  1. Be reliable. As with any type of writing, make sure you know what you’re talking about. If you’re blogging about a breaking news story, make sure you’ve got the facts right. Link back to the original story, so that people know you’re not making it up as you go along. On the flip side, don’t be afraid to ask a few questions, to give the readers something to comment on and talk about.
  2. Write lists. There’s something about lists that readers and other bloggers love. They contain a lot of information, they’re neatly ordered, easy for readers to skim through, and easy for other bloggers to link to. While you don’t want to overdo it on the lists, adding them into the mix now and then is a great idea. You could even create a brand, like the TV Squad Ten and Film Gecko Five.
  3. End your post with a question. That’s a call for immediate action, and when a reader sees it, they automatically start thinking of an answer and are more inclined to leave a comment. It can be as simple as asking readers for their own ‘Fringe’ theories or asking what TV guys have the best girly scream.
    Continue Reading

How do You Become a Film Blogger?

Author:

When I talk with my friends, I realize that I might just have the best blogging gig in the world with my Dave On Film blog. Every week I get email from the major movie studios and their agencies, inviting me to special screenings of motion pictures large and small, and every day I get updates on what’s in production, what’s filming, the upcoming schedule for studios, and much more.

Yeah, I’m a film geek. But here’s the thing: there’s nothing I’ve done that you couldn’t do too, fellow film fanatic. I often get questions from friends on how to become a film blogger or film critic, and even got one today from a friend who wants to know what elements should be present in a good film review on her weblog.

So I’ll spill the beans, share the secret sauce, let you in on the secret cookie recipe. The real secret?  Love films, see a lot of them, and write about them.

Continue Reading

Should I Post My Personal Opinions On The BlogWorld Twitter Account?

Author:

Where to start with this one? How about the inspiration for this post? First, I sent out two apparently controversial tweets this morning:

surprise, all those iPad buyers are Mac Fanboys and girls http://bit.ly/bZt9y5 gotta give it to Apple they have a loyal community

and

LOL and a great follow up story, the ipad doesn’t work http://tcrn.ch/aGmSWy LOL suckers /ipad rant off

That set off a storm of comments from what I would like to think are supporters of our event. One of them actually unfollowed us/me because of it. I’m going to try and provide the time line in reverse chronological order here but please forgive me if I mess it up somehow:

victorcajiao

@blogworld I see. Maybe you should Mac hate under your own name. Many new media peopley use Macs, and we would (cont) http://tl.gd/oim80

donmcallister

@blogworld I’m sure the majority of us Mac users don’t know the back story but I’m with @victorcajiao on this one.

StefaanLesage

@victorcajiao @blogworld i would have to agree with victor. Pretty strange reading that from the official blogworld Twitter account

victorcajiao

@blogworld so that’s Blogworlds official position on us being loyal to Macs ? If so the count me out of supporting @blogworld.

BlogWorld (AKA me)

@victorcajiao no thats my official opinion and im surprised at your reaction i’m not free to share my opinion?

victorcajiao

@blogworld no you can share it. I don’t have to participate. Goodbye @blogworld

StefaanLesage

@blogworld yeah, but wonder what would happen if all mac users stay away from blogworld

johnfbraun

@blogworld @victorcajiao Probably best to separate personal opinion from official BlogWorld communication, which is what I though this was.

StefaanLesage

@blogworld @victorcajiao you are free to share personal opinions from your personal twitter account, be careful with branded / company acc

StefaanLesage

@johnfbraun @blogworld @victorcajiao i agree with my us colleagues. Create / use a personal Twitter acct.

GeekCred

Wow @blogworld, I’m not an Apple fanboy, but way to go and damage your brand by shamelessly disrespecting your customers. Fail… “sucker”!

PodcastHelper

@GeekCred @victorcajiao agreed, keep your personal opinion off your “official” conference feed, wrong fight to pick…@blogworld fail

donmcallister

@blogworld Before this blows out of proportion. I would not expect someones personal opinion on an event branded Twitter feed.

donmcallister

@blogworld esp calling a good portion of attendees and speakers losers ( albeit indirectly by association)

BlogWorld (AKA me)

@DonMcAllister wow no I didnt, putting up a blog post, this is far more than a twitter conversation

donmcallister

@blogworld Sorry, you didn’t say “losers” it was “LOL suckers” yes, that was it!

GeekCred

@blogworld That kind of personal opinion does’nt belong on an event branded Twitter account; totally unpnrofessional, undermines credibility

@GeekCred sorry I disagree. our event is all about personal credibility

StefaanLesage

@blogworld let me know when it’s online.

BlogWorld (AKA me)

@StefaanLesage will do typing as fast as I can

StefaanLesage

@donmcallister @blogworld I had the same feeling about this. Made me think it’s an official blogworld statement

BlogWorld (AKA me)

@StefaanLesage a statement about what? Did you read the posts I linked to? They were both interesting and informative

BlogWorld (AKA me)

@victorcajiao Did you actually unfollow me just now Victor? I wish you would reconsider after reading the post

donmcallister

@blogworld Rick, for the record, completely respect your opinion and personal credibility, just needs to be voiced via your personal twitter

psimac

@donmcallister @blogworld I’m with you, Don. Considering many laptops I saw at Blogworld featured glowing Apple logos, this is in poor form.

DaveHamilton

@DonMcAllister @victorcajiao Some of the Rick Calvert begin_of_the_skype_highlighting     end_of_the_skype_highlighting (i.e. @blogworld) Mac-back-story on MGG 220. http://tmo.to/ecUo

DaveHamilton

@johnfbraun @blogworld @victorcajiao Agree with John 100% on this one: separate Twitter accounts for personal vs. corporate tweets.

and it is continuing.

There are so many points here. First off, did anyone responding to my tweets read any of the posts I linked to?

Like the one about Apple’s draconian PR tactics?

Or the TechCrunch story about all the complaints about the Ipads not geting WiFi reception?

Or the story showing how many ipad buyers were also iPhone and Mac owners?

But the largest point is: can I, Rick Calvert, share my personal opinions or jokes as my tweets clearly were on the BlogWorld twitter account?

Here is my @blogworld Twitter bio:

Tweets from Blogworld & New Media Expo, and its founder Rick Calvert

For the record, I have put up tons of personal opinions and thoughts in that twitter feed since I started the account Oct 31 2007.  Never, ever, have I received a reaction like today.  I did have one person complain about posting stuff other than directly related show information. I informed that person that its my account and my bio explained they were my tweets as well as company stuff.

Just two weeks ago Chris Brogan, me and several others had an interesting discussion about Twitter avatars. Chris told me I should change the @blogworld avatar to a picture of me because “you are blogworld”. I disagreed because I do see a distinction between a completely personal twitter account and a brand. But based on that discussion I just asked Dave(my partner) to create a new avatar for me/ @blogworld showing my face and the logo.

Today several people suggested I start my own personal twitter account to share my personal opinions. I am not going to do that.  First off because I started this event for me and content creators like me. I think offering a view of my thoughts and opinions is relevant to what our show is about. I do try to keep a balance between the personal and the official event stuff. I am very careful not to spam out “buy now” type messages. I try very hard to provide useful and relevant information to our community and my friends. I try to introduce and expose different friends and members of the community to each other who might not otherwise have met except for through our event.

That is what I think my / the @blogworld twitter account is for. Obviously some of you disagree. I do see the arguments for it but I am not convinced its the right thing to do particularly for BlogWorld and the type of event it is. I may change my mind and I hope others can make those arguments why I am wrong in the comments below or on their own blogs and podcasts.

Now lets talk about what personal opinions and what type of jokes are and are not allowed in a business context. Religion; I think everyone agrees that’s a no no in a business setting. Politics; I was a political blogger, that’s what inspired me to launch BlogWorld & New Media Expo in the first place. I killed off my political blog when we launched the event specifically to not offend people who might disagree with my politics. Are there any other third rails of polite business discussion?

Are Macs, the iPad, Iphone, and all Apple products untouchable for conversation and in particular dissent and mockery?

I didn’t think so but I guess I was wrong. Microsoft now that’s a fair target. Everybody hates them right?

Apple can base their entire ad campaign on mocking PC users (most computer users in the world) and that’s ok but bash a Mac and the world comes crashing down?

I’m sorry guys, I find that weird. I like the PC guy in those commercials. I was just having fun at the expense of some of my friends who maybe love their macs a little too much. I never meant to offend you and certainly didn’t mean to hurt your feelings so if I did I sincerely apologize for that but come on people make fun of me for my PC all the time.

As @victorjaio pointed out lots of new media content creators are Mac users. I know that, I get that. I know many Mac products are new media friendly, many of my friends are mac users, but seriously Apple is not a new media friendly company, guys. They are not all that supportive of their community and they know there is a certain percentage of their community that will buy anything they sell even if its phone that doesn’t work, or its on the worst mobile carrier in the country.

That’s my problem with Mac’s and Apple. Can we be friends again or have I crossed the Rubicon on this one?

***update 4.8.10****

I just found out that I am a “Hipster New Media Douchebag”

At least according to John C. Welsh. And all this time I thought I was just a fat guy in a Harley shirt.

***

Stressed Out in the Blogosphere

Author:

Some of my friends are quitting the blogosphere, supposedly for good. One of them even sold off all his old blogs and domains. The pressure to keep up and succeed “on the web” became too stressful and they decided to step back and do other things. Real world things. One of  these friends went back to corporate America, while another entered the wacky world of retail. I reflect on my my love of writing, the flexibility and ability to call my own shots and wonder why anyone would want to give it all up and enter into the rat race.

I realize how much I take for granted. I’m very happy with the success I’ve achieved as a blogger, but this hasn’t happened for everyone. Blogging isn’t the same big old kumbaya for everyone. We have to come up with unique content every day and market the hell out of our work and ourselves. We have to network online and offline and continue to pimp and push in order to bring in a few Adsense dollars each month.

Do only the strong survive blogging?

It’s been my experience that the folks who do best with their blogs are the ones who:

  • Post at least once each day.
  • Join the conversation on forums, social networks and other blogs
  • Network both offline and online
  • Collaborate with others
  • Work at it every day
  • Treat their blogging as a business

Very few bloggers can put in a minimal effort and hit it big. From what I can tell, the people who don’t do well are the ones who give up after a certain amount of time or don’t follow up on their good intentions. For example, a couple of blogs I started are languishing because I don’t have time to post to them each day. The one that does the best gets several hours of attention each day – from me and others. I imagine it’s even more frustrating for bloggers who put quite a bit of time and effort into what they do only to give it up when it doesn’t pay off.

Another blogger told me that there’s incredible “pressure to perform” with blogging. He said it’s not easy to talk about the same topic each day and not sound redundant, especially if you’ve been doing this for as long as I have. I don’t know about that. I enjoy writing about blogging and writing each day. After five years I’m not sick of it and I haven’t run out of things to to talk about. I think my community’s high expectations keep me from slacking off, though.

Stress and pressure? This is the least stressful gig I’ve held yet!

What do you think? Are you ever challenged to find stuff to write about each day or do you feel stressed if you’re not constantly putting out content or promoting your stuff?

Is there pressure to peform?

Deb Ng is professional blogger and founder of the Freelance Writing Jobs Network. Feel free to follow her on twitter @debng.

Why Do Small Businesses Need To Be Blogging?

Author:

This is a guest post by Tara Anderson Marketing Manager at Lijit:

With the landscape of today’s media changing at a rapid pace, if your company doesn’t have a blog, it’s sure to be left behind. I know, I know, everyone tells you that. But perhaps by answering a few of the commonly asked questions I hear when discussing small business blogging, you’ll be more prepared to jump into the blogging waters.

Why do small businesses need to be blogging?

Short answer:  Because your competitor is.

Long answer:  Blogging can help you to generate leads and keep your current customers informed. And aside from the acquisition and retention of customers, blogs can assist with getting found on Google easier. Most search engines index blogs faster and more regularly than static websites because blogs are dynamic. Since you’re updating a blog frequently, search engines get notified and therefore your “Google juice” increases. What business doesn’t want to be ranked higher when a potential customer does a search?

Additionally, as someone who does marketing for a technology company, blogging has benefitted us in two ways. First of all, our blog has shown people the human side and personality of our company. This is huge when it comes to engaging our users and giving them a sense of our company culture. And secondly, we like to hear feedback from the people using our product. With our blog, we can do just that. Having the ability to talk with your users in an informal way is priceless.

I’m a little nervous about getting started. What should I take into consideration before launching my blog?

In my opinion, the most important thing to keep in mind before starting a company blog is resources…namely–time, money and ideas.

First of all, small businesses need to take stock of the talents they have internally. If there is someone working for the business who already has an interest in social media or perhaps really enjoys writing, you should consider that person a resource to help you with blogging. Maintenance is key with a blog and if you already have someone in-house who enjoys such things, you should take advantage of that. There’s nothing sadder than an abandoned blog.

Next comes the money part. Do you want to pay for your blogging platform or go with a free offering? There are pros and cons to each, obviously, and with the majority of paid versions come many more options for customization. Think about what you want to put into your blog financially and do your research.

Finally, there’s the task of deciding what you’re going to write about. Sit down for a brainstorming session and get creative. Your blog shouldn’t just be a mouthpiece to shout your message, but a place for you to feature your customers, discuss industry specifics and establish yourself as a thought leader.

Don’t forget about the fun. Talk about what conferences you’re going to or what meetups you’ll be attending. Ask others in the company what they want to be reading about on your blog and then get them involved.  Have a few ideas and blog posts in place before fully launching your blog…it’ll make things easier in the long run.

Now that you have your person, your platform and some topic ideas, are there any essential tools that I should be using to enhance my blog?

Here are my top three recommendations for any beginning blogger…

  • Images. When a reader comes to your blog and sees all text, it can look a little boring. Don’t be afraid to liven things up by illustrating your blog post with something visual. Or think about including pictures of your employees, your customers or your office. It all goes back to the personality piece I mentioned earlier.
  • Search. [Full disclosure: I work for Lijit and we provide a custom site search for bloggers.] Make sure your readers have a way to find all of that great content you’re creating on your blog. And if your site search is any good (*cough* Lijit *cough*) then it will provide you with analytics about what your readers are searching for, how they’re getting to your blog and what searches they’re doing that return no results. This is huge for better understanding your blog audience.
  • Comments. The whole point of a blog is to be able to have a conversation with your customers. If you don’t have comments enabled, then you’re shutting down that two-way street and your blog becomes another one-way marketing message with no engagement. Feedback and discussion are only going to happen if you let it. And now, with third-party commenting systems like Disqus and Intense Debate, you can have the option to moderate comments before they go live. This gives companies a small element of control over potential spammers and trolls.

What about some challenges I may run into with my blog?

I think people get overwhelmed with the care and feeding that goes into a blog. They launch their blog and then expect to have lots of readers and commenters the next day. You have to be patient because like anything else, blogging takes time. I suggest putting together an editorial calendar to plan out your blog posts a bit. Perhaps you want to do something fun every Friday or schedule interviews with customers every other week. Having a visual aid can be a fantastic organizing tool when dealing with the maintenance of a company blog.

Also, see what other people are doing with their company blogs. There is a lot of creativity floating around out there and sometimes it just takes opening yourself up to it in order for things to click. To illustrate my point, if a fiber equipment company and a concrete company can create successful blogs, so can you.

Any final thoughts on blogging?

Blogging is, by nature, a much more informal type of writing. Take some time to develop your voice and tone on the blog. The blog should sound more like a conversation than anything else. Readers aren’t there to read a white paper or to read something that’s overly technical. They are there to find out more about your company, to engage and the easier you make it for people to read and do that, the more successful your blog will be.

Whatever you do, stick with it because very soon, if you don’t have a blog, you will be one of the few.

What Type of Blogger Are You?

Author:

In 2010 there are more blogs than ever. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes and all sorts of niches and genres. They lecture and praise. They teach and they amuse.  I may not read or enjoy every single blog, but I can certainly appreciate them all. For each different type of blog there are also bloggers with very different styles.

Unique Voices are what makes the blogosphere go ’round.

What kind of blogger are you?

The Influencer: You’re an A-lister who gives solid advice to throngs of adoring fans. It doesn’t matter what you say or how you say it, they’re absorbing every word. One blog posts yields thousands of tweets, retweets and pingbacks. You could post the lyrics to “Yankee Doodle” and your fans would still find some sort of profound meeting. You help, you enlighten, and you share. You’re in demand to speak at conferences and everyone wants to guest blog for you. You take some knocks once in a while but your community believes in you and that’s all that matters. When you talk, people listen.

The Make Money Online Blogger: You make money online and you’re not afraid to share how you do it. You list your Adsense tips, your affiliate tricks and aren’t afraid of losing your community to sponsored posts and tweets. You’re controversial if only because you’re not subtle about how you’re earning your money. Some will say you’re spammy but they’re just jealous because they’re not earning $30,000 per month.

The Nice Blogger: Who can say anything mean about you? Everyone likes you. You respect your community and they respect you in return. You present your tips and advice in a non-condescending manner allowing your community to make informed decisions. You have no ulterior motives, you simply like to share.

The Do As I Say Not As I Do Blogger: You have rules for all occasions. Blog rules, social media rules, rules for your niche, yet you hardly follow any of them because mere rules don’t apply to you. Perhaps it’s because you don’t see that you’re breaking your own rules or perhaps you’re too busy being a Guru to realize what you’re doing. It’s all good though, no one takes posts like that seriously anyway.

The Tough Love Blogger: What the hell is wrong with all these pussy footing, nicey nice bloggers? Don’t they know that brutal honesty and tough love is better than  pleasantries? You tell it straight out like it is anyone who doesn’t get it is wrong, misguided or just plain dumb.

The Controversial Blogger: Who doesn’t love a good train wreck? Controversial Bloggers know the way to get comments and links is to ride the controversy or negativity wagon. It doesn’t matter that after the train wreck is cleared everyone goes home, Controversial Bloggers find a new bandwagon controversy once the spectator factor begins to dwindle.

The Style over Substance Blogger: You write with a flourish and have a pretty, pretty blog but you don’t have much to say.  Oh sure, you have a daily topic and while it hints at a point it never really gets to one. No worries though, folks like a good fashion show.

The Linkbait Blogger: Your blog is a cocktail of lists, funny images, controversy and content all pointing to one specific goal: growing traffic through links. This isn’t a bad thing, folks come to your blog for its entertainment value. Not every blog post needs to be serious and not every blogger has to teach.  However, your challenge is in finding ‘bait that will continue to give the people what they want.

The Coattails Rider: No one knew who you were until you found a few Influencers to hang out with. Now everyone knows your name, not because you have your own blog, but because of who your friends are.

The Guest Blogger: Not to be confused with the Coattails Rider, the Guest Blogger spends more time trying to build links to his blog by guest blogging than actually blogging his own stuff.

The Jack of All Trades Blogger: Also known as the Blogger for Hire, you don’t have your own blogs, you blog for others. You like it that way because you don’t have to deal with technical aspects or heavy promotion. You’re making money online, you’re just making more money for someone else.

The Guru Blogger: The difference between an Influencer and a Guru is that Gurus are usually self appointed. They use terms such as “expert” or “ninja” to describe themselves. Influencers build trust, Gurus insist on it.

The Swag Blogger: It’s not clear whether or not Swag Bloggers blog to receive swag or receive swag to blog. In any event, their blogs are bonanzas of product reviews and giveaways. Folks come by more to win prizes than to read the reviews, but it’s all good because you receive lots of free stuff.

The Discreditor: Your own blog isn’t growing as quickly as you’d like. Either creating quality content is too slow and difficult or you just don’t have enough original ideas. Instead, you spend your time discrediting other bloggers in your niche. If the blogosphere can’t see that you’re the best and everyone else sucks, why, you’ll just have to point it out to them. They’re not smart enough to figure anything out on their own anyway. So what if you’re negativity is driving people away. They don’t deserve to be a part of your community anyway.

The Paris Hilton: If the Paris Hilton has a blog no one know where it is or what it’s about. She has tens of thousands of followers on Twitter and her face is familiar at conferences and meetups. Yet, know one knows exactly why.  She could be a Coattail Rider or Guest Blogger, but then, no one has ever seen anything she wrote so we can’t say for sure. She’s famous for being famous..

The Cheerleader: The picture of positivity, The Cheerleader doesn’t believe in words such as “no” or “can’t.” Cheerleaders present tips that inspire, motivate and spur us action. The Cheerleader is popular both in blogosphere and in life mostly for her positive message.

The Hobbyist: The Hobbyist isn’t in it for the money or glory, he simply likes to blog. He’s entertaining and it’s clear there are no ulterior motives. He speaks what’s on his mind and has no defined niche. His community is made up of mostly friends and relatives, though occasionally he posts something that goes viral.

The Rambler: The rambler talks to hear himself talk. He likes tangents. There’s usually a point to his blog posts, he simply takes the scenic route in getting there. Brevity is for wusses.

The What About Me Blogger:  When am I going to be a famous blogger? When are people going to notice me? I post links to my content in everyone’s comments and they don’t even allow them to go through. I write to all the A-listers and ask them to link to me and they never do. WHEN IS IT GOING TO BE MY TURN. WHEN WILL I BE FAMOUS?????

What kind of blogger are you? Do you fit any of these descriptions or do you serve up a combination platter? Tell us about your blog and your method of blogging in the comments.

Deb Ng is a freelance writer, professional blogger and founder of the Freelance Writing Jobs network. Feel free to follow her on Twitter @debng.

Media Is Not Objective

Author:

As I was reading this post by Paul Carr at TechCrunch this morning it occurred to me that if you substituted the word “Obama” for the word “Apple” Paul would have just written a post that could have been seen on any given conservative political blog any day of the week.

That inspired me to hop on a very old and familiar soap box of mine. But I haven’t been on this particular soap box in quite a while so maybe I can fool you into thinking its new =p.

I agree with Paul, Apple fan boys make me crazy. Particularly when they are supposed to be journalists, even worse when they are supposed to be new media journalists fighting against what we all see as old media biases and bad journalism.

But the underlying point applies to all forms of media including me; and since you are reading this post most likely you too. Everyone of us  brings some bias to the table every time we write a post, create a podcast, or send out a tweet.

The best thing we can all do and the thing we should do is be honest about our own inherent biases.  In that spirit you can find some of my biases at the bottom of this post. But something else we can all do is attempt to limit the influence of our bias in our content. I know its a hard thing to do sometimes **cough** Jets Suck**cough**. See what I mean? If you want to create great content you need to constantly stay on guard to keep from falling into the fanboy trap.

So if you find yourself writing a post that is arguing whether the iPod or the Macbook is the greatest invention in the history of man kind you just might be a fanboy. If you find yourself writing a post about how every time you see the president on TV the birds around you seem to break into song, you might not be the most objective political observer.

Now back to those biases of mine; I love San Diego, the Chargers, the Padres and even the Soccers (one for the thumb baby!), I hate Los Angeles and all their sports teams and no the Raiders are not an LA team you only rented them for a couple of years so get over it Angelinos.  I don’t like the Jets very much now either. That will most likely pass when we crush them next year like we should have this weekend.  I can’t help liking Rex Ryan even if he is a windbag.  I find myself being much more conservative now than when I was younger even if I’m still a registered Democrat.  I am and was a Ford man before they sponsored BlogWorld. With the exception of my 72 El Camino (great car) and an Oldsmobile Delta88 I drove for a month, every car I have ever owned has been a Ford. I am a PC and damn proud of it.  I have used my iPod less than a dozen times and now its broken. So you could characterize me as an anti-Mac Fanboy.  I am an old metal head and prefer Black Sabbath, Metallica and Megadeath to Nirvana and Pearl Jam.  To clarify that’s old Metallica before they cut their hair and released the Black album.  I used to be a Bud man but now prefer a good Guinness or Augustiner.

What are your biases?

Who are you a fanboy of?

National Delurking Day

Author:

This is a bit of an old school blog day that we celebrate each year.  I think I first posted about this day about 4-5 years ago on my Daddy Blog.  What is Delurking Day you might ask?  In the blog world, many people read blogs and they watch and read comments all the while staying in the shadows and not being a part of the conversation.  They are shy or they think that they don’t have something to add that is useful, or they just want to stay anonymous.

Delurking Day was formed to make it a day where everyone could leave a comment and be seen on the blog.  It was a great way for bloggers to find out who was reading and also a time for those that were shy or not wanting to be seen on the blog to have a chance to say hello as well.  If you are a regular reader of a blogs and you never want to leave a comment but enjoy reading and watching the comments as conversations ensue, this is your day. leave a comment and say hello.

You should also take this opportunity to post this on your own blog if you have one so that you can also have your own lurkers leave their comment.

My old friend Chris at RudeCactus tells us the rules:

Second, it’s Delurking Day! Yep, that’s right. The Official Delurking Day is back. Read the site? Comment. Comment all the time? Cool, do it again. A little shy? Come on, comment – you know you wanna. Take it to the streets – go comment all willy-nilly all over the blogosphere. You’ll be glad you did. And so will all the bloggers already hard at work on tomorrow’s posts.

Take the button here and post it.  See who is reading by getting them to comment.  Of course you must first leave a comment here and delurk yourself.

Tag You're It! – Why Tagging Your Content Is Important

Author:

Tag You're It

If I have said it once I have said it a thousand times, “We live in a Google world.”  It is true, we don’t order Chinese food, find directions to the store, or stalk old girlfriends without using Google.  Being findable in this world is important if you are trying to be found.  Businesses especially must pay attention to how their customers can find them.  Keywords and key phrases are how that is accomplished through the use of meta tags or just tags.

Tags are a keyword associated with content attached to it.  If you want people to read your latest blog post on how to wash a cat, you have to determine how they would look for that content and attach that key word or phrase to it.

The same rule applies to your content as a publisher whether it be a blog, a podcast, video or even your photos.  We often put pictures into our posts that we find which we feel are relevant to our content, the title or completely off the wall for that matter.  We find those pictures at places like flickr, istockphoto, and yes, Google image search.  We enter a keyword into the search function of those sites to find a picture for the content.

In addition to being searchable or findable, it also has the effect of increasing traffic to your content and makes the content watched, seen and readable.  One of the things that I do on a regular basis is to search out and find anyone that mentions BlogWorld & New Media Expo.  You can imagine all the different variations of that and the number of tags used to describe our event.  This is also why we like people that use a common tag.  The most used tag last year was of course “BWE09” and this year we are urging everyone to use “BWE10”.  This allows us a quick reference to your blog post, your picture on your photo sharing site, your podcast and your YouTube (owned of course by Google) or other videos. A YouTube search with “blog world” returns 234,000 results.  We all know it may be difficult for me to look at that many videos.  Using a tag like BWE10 focuses the searcher into your content. A similar search with BWE09 allows me the benefit of watching less that 150 videos.

If your content is well done and is something we need to share with our community, we find and share it.  This in turn increases the readers, listeners, or viewers of your content.  We are still pouring over the content generated as a result of the 2009 event in October, I am finding new content daily and still trying to read all of it.  As we grow and get bigger and have more content generated it is going to be tougher to find your content and thereby making it even more important for you to tag appropriately.

For the upcoming show in 2010 we are asking everyone to tag your content “BWE10”  If you Tweet that hashtag, put that in your post, attach it to your videos, photos and podcasts, I’ll be there to say hello.  If it is something that needs to be shared with the thousands of people in our community, we’ll do so and increase your traffic and readership.  If I miss something because I couldn’t find it, your content may never get discovered and broadcast further.  We are listening and we are paying attention to what is being said. Tag your content!

Photo Via SD_Kirk

Tag You’re It! – Why Tagging Your Content Is Important

Author:

Tag You're It

If I have said it once I have said it a thousand times, “We live in a Google world.”  It is true, we don’t order Chinese food, find directions to the store, or stalk old girlfriends without using Google.  Being findable in this world is important if you are trying to be found.  Businesses especially must pay attention to how their customers can find them.  Keywords and key phrases are how that is accomplished through the use of meta tags or just tags.

Tags are a keyword associated with content attached to it.  If you want people to read your latest blog post on how to wash a cat, you have to determine how they would look for that content and attach that key word or phrase to it.

The same rule applies to your content as a publisher whether it be a blog, a podcast, video or even your photos.  We often put pictures into our posts that we find which we feel are relevant to our content, the title or completely off the wall for that matter.  We find those pictures at places like flickr, istockphoto, and yes, Google image search.  We enter a keyword into the search function of those sites to find a picture for the content.

In addition to being searchable or findable, it also has the effect of increasing traffic to your content and makes the content watched, seen and readable.  One of the things that I do on a regular basis is to search out and find anyone that mentions BlogWorld & New Media Expo.  You can imagine all the different variations of that and the number of tags used to describe our event.  This is also why we like people that use a common tag.  The most used tag last year was of course “BWE09” and this year we are urging everyone to use “BWE10”.  This allows us a quick reference to your blog post, your picture on your photo sharing site, your podcast and your YouTube (owned of course by Google) or other videos. A YouTube search with “blog world” returns 234,000 results.  We all know it may be difficult for me to look at that many videos.  Using a tag like BWE10 focuses the searcher into your content. A similar search with BWE09 allows me the benefit of watching less that 150 videos.

If your content is well done and is something we need to share with our community, we find and share it.  This in turn increases the readers, listeners, or viewers of your content.  We are still pouring over the content generated as a result of the 2009 event in October, I am finding new content daily and still trying to read all of it.  As we grow and get bigger and have more content generated it is going to be tougher to find your content and thereby making it even more important for you to tag appropriately.

For the upcoming show in 2010 we are asking everyone to tag your content “BWE10”  If you Tweet that hashtag, put that in your post, attach it to your videos, photos and podcasts, I’ll be there to say hello.  If it is something that needs to be shared with the thousands of people in our community, we’ll do so and increase your traffic and readership.  If I miss something because I couldn’t find it, your content may never get discovered and broadcast further.  We are listening and we are paying attention to what is being said. Tag your content!

Photo Via SD_Kirk

Learn About NMX

NEW TWITTER HASHTAG: #NMX

Recent Comments

Categories

Archives