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Values-based Blogging: 5 Ways a Blogger’s Creed Can Set You Apart

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Much has been written about the importance of a blogger’s about page. It’s true. Your online bio is the connector between you and your readers. It lets them get a personal peek, past you the blogger, to you the person.

But does it go far enough? Are there any good reasons for taking that extra step: for sharing your core beliefs and values?

Your very own blogger’s creed, front and center on your blog, can be an excellent tool for doing just that.

Spelling out who you are and what you believe in will separate you out from the gazillions of other bloggers out there. For an example of a blogger’s creed, you can see mine over at my bobwp blog. I call it “Things I Believe.”

Why should you bother creating a blogger’s creed?

1. It communicates your core beliefs and code of ethics.

Online, in a world full of avatars and sound bites, our ‘humanness’ can sometimes suffer. Sharing your guiding beliefs, the principles you live by, just makes us feel like we know you—and trust you—so much more.

2. It shows inclusiveness.

If you let your readers know ahead of time that you value them enough to share your personal side, you are telling them that you want them to come closer. You are telling them that you invite their participation in the community. Most of all, you are showing that you believe in making your blog a friendly, welcoming place.

3. It forewarns your community that you expect them to play nice.

More than just a standard synopsis of your commenting policies, a blogger’s creed (or whatever you choose to call it), can create the climate and sense of community you want to foster on your blog. So people who are tempted to go against that code will think twice about it.

4. It helps you find like-minded clients and customers.

Like attracts like. If you are interested in working with people who share similar values, you are setting it up by sharing your work style and relationship-building philosophy. If yours is a business blog, you will be more likely to find clients and customers who appreciate your honesty and the opportunity to try the relationship on for size before they approach you.

5. It opens you up to new partnership opportunities.

Other bloggers and potential business partners like knowing more about you than just where you have worked before and what hobbies you enjoy. Many times, just reading your short list of core beliefs can make them much more comfortable picking up that phone or sending that email.

On the other side of the coin, it can also weed out the people who are not a good fit with your view of the world.

Because you know yourself better than anyone else in the world, it won’t be too hard to come up with a short list of, say, five to eight things, you believe most about people and life. And it can even be a fun exercise.

What about you?

Do you have a blogger’s creed on your blog?

Have you ever thought about creating one?


Feedback

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  • WordsDoneWrite

    I just love this idea, Bob! I am most certainly going to review my about page and give some thought to a blogger’s creed. I know I’d enjoy reading it for other bloggers, so it only makes sense that it would be good to have one on mine. Thanks for the great suggestion!
     

    • bobWP

       @WordsDoneWrite You are very welcome. I think it would be interesting to see on other blogs, and how people feel about sharing. I know the term “transparent” is often overused, but this gives a whole new meaning to it. Thanks and will look forward to seeing yours!

  • Blane Jackson

    I’ve been giving “the value of blogging” a lot of thought. After all, it takes a lot of time and discipline to write and research blogs on a regular basis. What’s the point? 
     
    My conclusion is that the model for artists has changed forever and online content delivery is really not meant to be a “money maker” anymore, it’s evolved into a marketing device. It’s the free sample of stir fried chicken at the food court in the Mall. As such, it’s changed from profit center, to a cost center.
     
    Musicians and writers are both going through the same experience. Whereas musicians once made most of their money selling albums (selling content) via hard media and later, downloads, now it seems at least new, upcoming musicians do better promoting themselves by giving away downloads in order to sell out live venues on multiple nights.
     
    Similarly editorial writers, seem to do better promoting themselves via free online content, and cashing out via speaking engagements, endorsements, personal appearances, or by any other means that “famous” people make money. The true value is that it builds your reputation, it builds your expertise, and maintains a link with your fan base. It’s a marketing tool, not a money maker.
     
     

    • bobWP

       @Blane Jackson Yes, some interesting points you made here, but not sure exactly what it has to do with my post on a bloggers creed, but appreciate your thoughts and this certainly could be a bases for another debatable blog post. : )

  • Blane Jackson

    I’ve been giving “the value of blogging” a lot of thought. After all, it takes a lot of time and discipline to write and research blogs on a regular basis. What’s the point? 
     
    My conclusion is that the model for artists has changed forever and online content delivery is really not meant to be a “money maker” anymore, it’s evolved into a marketing device. It’s the free sample of stir fried chicken at the food court in the Mall. As such, it’s changed from profit center, to a cost center.
     
    Musicians and writers are both going through the same experience. Whereas musicians once made most of their money selling albums (selling content) via hard media and later, downloads, now it seems at least new, upcoming musicians do better promoting themselves by giving away downloads in order to sell out live venues on multiple nights.
     
    Similarly editorial writers, seem to do better promoting themselves via free online content, and cashing out via speaking engagements, endorsements, personal appearances, or by any other means that “famous” people make money. The true value is that it builds your reputation, it builds your expertise, and maintains a link with your fan base. It’s a marketing tool, not a money maker.
     
    http://www.blanejackson.com
     

  • joostharmsen

    very interesting points, it’s going to be helpful for my blogs thanks and keep up the good work!

  • StumblingGrace

    @justinelevine @blogworld @2manyfish2fry Really interesting post. Thanks for sharing. I don’t think it got to J the 1st time so I’ll resend.

  • Randy Carlisle

    I believe that it is a good thing to express your values and beliefs. But I feel it must be situation-appropriate. It would seem that values-based blogging means that your content actually solves a problem or provides information that can be useful to the reader. I predict that year 2013 will see bloggers improving the quality of their content and their message.

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