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February 2007

live blogging "Blog to the Chief"

Author:

It looks like about 250 people a standing room only crowd has showed up here at the Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics to see how blogs are impacting modern day politics. The bloggers back stage Jerome Armstrong of MYDD, Erick Ericson of Red State Patrick Hynes of Ankle Bitung Pundits and consultant to GOP Presidential candidate John McCain, Scott Johnson Co-Founder of Powerline Blog. Joan McCarter of Daily Kos and our host Professor David Perlmutter all seem very relaxed and are enjoying each others company.
*Update**

Some mild controlled chaos as last minute details of who is sitting where is worked out. The Institute’s Director Bill Lacy has made the introductions and the bloggers are taking the stage.

Just before the panel started we were all allowed to take a private tour of the archives and for all of us political junkies it was amazing.

*** update**

Joan McCarter:

“the most important lesson for presidential candidates to learn is this is not a static medium that they talk it. It is an interactive medium.

The first most important think is we are not an ATM. Politicians looked at all the money Howard Dean raised and thought of us as an ATM machine. We are more than that now and will demand more than that now.”

Scott Johnson:

“My partner John Hinderacker and I started writing about politics on their law practice site in 1992 for fun.”

**update**

Continue Reading

live blogging “Blog to the Chief”

Author:

It looks like about 250 people a standing room only crowd has showed up here at the Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics to see how blogs are impacting modern day politics. The bloggers back stage Jerome Armstrong of MYDD, Erick Ericson of Red State Patrick Hynes of Ankle Bitung Pundits and consultant to GOP Presidential candidate John McCain, Scott Johnson Co-Founder of Powerline Blog. Joan McCarter of Daily Kos and our host Professor David Perlmutter all seem very relaxed and are enjoying each others company.
*Update**

Some mild controlled chaos as last minute details of who is sitting where is worked out. The Institute’s Director Bill Lacy has made the introductions and the bloggers are taking the stage.

Just before the panel started we were all allowed to take a private tour of the archives and for all of us political junkies it was amazing.

*** update**

Joan McCarter:

“the most important lesson for presidential candidates to learn is this is not a static medium that they talk it. It is an interactive medium.

The first most important think is we are not an ATM. Politicians looked at all the money Howard Dean raised and thought of us as an ATM machine. We are more than that now and will demand more than that now.”

Scott Johnson:

“My partner John Hinderacker and I started writing about politics on their law practice site in 1992 for fun.”

**update**

Continue Reading

Should Olympic Atheletes be allowed to blog?

Author:

Interesting story on Brietbart the other day. Olympic Atheletes may be allowed to Blog:

The International Olympic Committee said Wednesday it is considering whether to let athletes post personal diaries on the Internet _ so long as the Olympic village isn’t turned into a “Big Brother” reality TV show.

Under Olympic rules, athletes, coaches and other team officials are barred from functioning as a “journalist or in any other media capacity” during the games. This is meant to protect the rights of the accredited media.

Of course the people who make the Olympics boring don’t get it. Allowing atheletes to blog would be a huge boost for the Olympics popularity and ratings. Spectators would be able to get insights and connect more with intimate details of sports they only casually watch every four years. Not to mention only getting coverage from announcers who know nothing about the sports they are covering.

If the IOC allowed atheletes to blog and the traditional media had their announcers and producers monitor them they would get far more interesting story lines and understand a whole lot more about the sports they are reporting on.

The a subgroup of the IOC press commission gets it:

“Athlete blogs bring a more modern perspective to the global appreciation of the games, particularly for a younger audience, and enhance the universality of the games,” the press group said.

This guy doesn’t:

Athletes’ commission member Bob Ctvrtlik, a former U.S. Olympic volleyball gold medalist, said privacy remained a major concern.

“We don’t want the village turned into a reality TV show during the Olympics,” he said. “We also want to protect rights that have been sold to sponsors. As of yet we don’t have a clear consensus on it.”  

I understand the need to protect sponsors dollars and exposure but protect old school media? That is silly and short sighted. Hopefully the IOC makes the right decision for their own good.

In other news this BlogWorld team member may have won his recent Tae Kwan Do tournament but is a long way from qualifying for the olympics.

Blogging News 2.8.07

Author:

Darren Rowse has a great post titled How I Make Money From Blogs – My Top Earners. In the post Darren lays out where his blogging income comes from (say that three times real fast). His revenue streams include Chitika, Google AdSense and Text Link Ads. Read the whole thing.

The Blog Herald has a post titled Big Blog vs. Many Small Blogs which examines the financial advantages of one blogging business model vs. the other. Jason Calacanis founder of Weblogs Inc. and Jeremy Wright CEO of b5 both respond in the comments section. Check it out.

 

 

New York Times to Stop Printing Newpaper

Author:

Eytan Avriel had a discussion with NYT owner, chairman and publisher Arthur Sulzberger at the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. He has some very interesting things to report from that conversation in Haeretz today. Here is an excerpt.

Given the constant erosion of the printed press, do you see the New York Times still being printed in five years?

“I really don’t know whether we’ll be printing the Times in five years, and you know what? I don’t care either,” he says.

Sulzberger is focusing on how to best manage the transition from print to Internet.

“The Internet is a wonderful place to be, and we’re leading there,” he points out.

The Times, in fact, has doubled its online readership to 1.5 million a day to go along with its 1.1 million subscribers for the print edition.

Sulzberger says the New York Times is on a journey that will conclude the day the company decides to stop printing the paper. That will mark the end of the transition. It’s a long journey, and there will be bumps on the road, says the man at the driving wheel, but he doesn’t see a black void ahead.

And then he said this:

In the age of bloggers, what is the future of online newspapers and the profession in general? There are millions of bloggers out there, and if the Times forgets who and what they are, it will lose the war, and rightly so, according to Sulzberger. “We are curators, curators of news. People don’t click onto the New York Times to read blogs. They want reliable news that they can trust,” he says.

“We aren’t ignoring what’s happening. We understand that the newspaper is not the focal point of city life as it was 10 years ago. 

 “Once upon a time, people had to read the paper to find out what was going on in theater. Today there are hundreds of forums and sites with that information,” he says. “But the paper can integrate material from bloggers and external writers. We need to be part of that community and to have dialogue with the online world.”

Old media meet new media indeed.

Reaction from the blogosphere: Glass House 

I’m pretty optimistic about the role of journalism, in print and online. Good to see Art agrees with me. 😉

Chip Griffin

The other missing piece is to provide subway and other travelers a means to read that content without firing up a laptop.

Techdirt

the Times is happy to embrace the internet, so long as it’s on its own terms, and the core business model remains the same. It still wants to get paid the same way, and it hopes that its 155 years of history as the paper of record will allow it remain a trusted source of news. Cast in this light, the rhetoric about one day abandoning the print edition doesn’t really sound so radical.

 

 

Bloggers Past Kills Political Future

Author:

***Update 10:58*** The Edwards campaign has released a statement and it looks like for now Ms. Marcotte will be keeping her job. /HT to commenter Aldon

***

When Amanda Marcotte landed her new gig as Blogmaster or Blogmistress for the Edwards campaign she was just the latest to cross over from political blogging to working for a politician. Then some people went digging into Marcotte’s archived posts at Pandagon. 

Edwards faced with either condemning or agreeing with Marcotte’s sometimes profane and sometimes offensive (particularly to Catholics) posts chose to fire Ms. Marcotte.

**Update** While Salon has reported the Edwards camp had fired Marcotte at this point the Edwards campaign maintains they have not made a decision on the matter yet.

So what should bloggers take away from this? 

Blogging is the new Frontier. University of Maryland’s Dean of journalism was recently quoted saying  “The Internet today is like the American West in the 1880s. It’s wild, it’s crazy and everybody’s got a gun,” HT/ Buzz Marketing

Unlike the Wild West however everything you type is recorded for all to see as long as Al Gore’s intraweb keeps ticking. As every politician knows everything you have ever said or done is fair game in politics. Bloggers would do well to remember what you type today can and very well may be used against you later on. Particularly if you decide to enter politics, but this could also affect your career, legal liability and relationships.

That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t blog, or even be controversial or provocative when you blog. Just go into it understanding that you will own your words forever. As long as you are willing to stand by them; Blog on!

PayPerPost to host blogging conference PostiCon…. Controversy follows

Author:

PayPerPost recently announced they will be holding PostiCon in Orlando and yesterday announced Robert Scoble (a member or our advisory council) will be giving the keynote.

Of course controversy insued. Robert disclosed that PayPerPost would be paying him a speaking fee (to his employer PodTech) on top of his travelling expenses. That got people up in arms.

Robert has now decided to decline their offer of a speaking fee and only accept reimbursement of his travelling expenses. /shrug I don’t see anything wrong with him getting paid or not getting paid particularly when he disclosed it on his blog.

More reaction at CrunchNotes, Ryan Stewart,

Chip Griffin

Honoraria are nothing new. Paying expenses for speakers is nothing new. The fact that Scoble disclosed it is admirable. Frankly, I’m not even sure it was necessary. Speaking at any organization’s invitation, with or without financial reimbursement, could conceivably bias a person anyway, so the mere act itself was probably sufficient.Â

But to me, the most troubling thing I take from this episode is the Blog Mob will even engage in self-righteous hysteria targeted at one of the more well-known and (generally) respected members of the blogosphere. We all need to remember that we can still agree to disagree. Despite what many bloggers seem to think, for most issues there is no right or wrong answer, simply two (or more) individual’s opinions.

So let’s all give Scoble a break.Â

Â

Joe Duck, webomatica, Dumpster Bust.

 Jim Kukral

News Flash: Scoble and the other big guns are not real bloggers. They are brands. Real bloggers are 63 million people who write a blog about office furniture or their day at work. It’s a huge difference.

I have to take issue with this. If you have a blog and your not a spammer you are a real blogger. No matter your topic; be it sports, politics, business, technology, milblogging, godblogging, celebrity gossip blogging, or talking about your office furniture.

If you are making a living blogging and have a hundred thousands of readers a day or you post about your cat and get 2 readers a month as long as you are using blog publishing software to post it then you are a real blogger.

I started writing this because imo the whole “who is a real blogger” controversy is silly. Jim is just the latest to claim to be the final arbiter of who a “real” blogger is and who isn’t. Possibly failing to recognize by his own standard he is not (a real blogger) therefore how can he be qualified to say who is?

Now that I have taken the time to write it, I realize I am just as silly for responding.

/shrugÂ

 Off to watch a SuperBowl that I could care less who wins. Hopefully it’s a good game.

Â

Australian Blog Conference Delayed

Author:

From the organizer Professor Peter Black:

QUT has decided to postpone the Australian Blogging Conference until later in the year. We were faced with the option of running the conference with a registration fee or postponing it, and we have chosen to stick with our original vision and ethos and hold the conference without a registration fee later in 2007.

At this stage we are now planning to hold the conference in August this year.

Related: Upcoming Blogging Conference Down Under


Congratulations Glenn Greenwald

Author:

Progressive blogger (he would take issue with that characterization) Glenn Greenwald has just landed a new gig with Salon.com. Glenn and I started our blogs within days of each other back in 2005 and had some great cross blog debates. Glenn of course went on the write the New York Times best selling book How Would a Patriot Act?, appear on several television and radio programs and I…..did not =p.
Congratulations to Glenn on his well deserved success and for being the latest blogger to cross over to mainstream media.

More at Crooks and Liars, Skippy the Bush Kangaroo,

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