Looking for Something?
Posts Tagged for

video

How to Make a Video Using Video Scribing

Author:

Video scribing (or videoscribing or just plain “scribing”) is a pretty cool technique that I’m seeing more and more often online. With this technique, you draw using a screen capturing program or white board and speed it up to match an audio presentation. It requires a little artistic skill, but it’s a great option if you don’t like to be on camera.

It’s also a great option to use as a pattern interrupt. If all of your videos are just you talking to the camera, things can start to get a little boring. Doing a video that’s a little different in terms of format can spice things up.

I always thought that you had to be some kind of video genius to make a video scribing video, but our friend Pat Flynn from Smart Passive Income breaks down the process in the video tutorial below. It’s not easy, but it is manageable even for video newbies like me!

It you love Pat’s video tutorials as much as I do, make sure to pick up a ticket for NMX where he’ll be presenting Proven Methods to Use Free in Your Business to Get More Traffic, More Subscribers and More Customers. It’s a must see for all bloggers, podcasters, and video/web TV series producers!

Early bird pricing ends September 28th, so don’t delay! You can buy tickets here.

How to Keep Fans Interested in Your Web Series

Author:

I’d like to start this post by pointing out that I’m not a web series creator. I’m a blogger. That said, I am a huge fan of web series. I’m a huge geek, so some of my favorites include The Guild, My Drunk Kitchen, pretty much any series on That Guy With the Glasses. I also thought BBC’s The Pond Life leading up to the Doctor Who series 7 premier was brilliant.

That’s just scratching the surface of the web series I enjoy. Like most of you out there, however, my time is limited. You have to keep me interested with every episode or I’m probably going to forget about your series, instead moving on to find new series to enjoy. So how can you keep me (and other fans) interested? Here are my best tips:

1. Make some “special” episodes.

I absolutely love when web series producers includes some videos that are beyond the scope of the series itself. Behind-the-scenes footage, funny music videos, bloopers, and interviews with the cast are just a few examples of videos you can make that add a ton of value to your series. It’s like the special features disk when you buy a DVD. Fans who aren’t interested can just watch the series, but I think you’ll be surprised to know just how many viewers really do want extra footage.

2. Know your viewers – and make videos for them.

Without fail, the very best series always seem to be made for me. In other words, there’s a common theme, a thread that connects all of the videos so they’re made with a specific viewer in mind. Before you start filming the first episode or even getting too far along with the writing, think about the demographic you’re trying to target. Not everyone is going to like your web series, but that’s okay. You want to make rabid fans of the people who do like your series, not have a bunch of people who say “meh, it was okay” and never watch past the second or third episode.

3. Take your show on the road.

I never watched The Guild until I met some of the actors at a video game convention. At that point, the series was certainly popular, but it has only grown in popularity since then. Getting your actors out there, visible and promoting the show, is going to not only help you find new fans, but it is also going to feed your current hungry fans, keeping them interested in your series. Even if you can’t get a booth or speak on a panel at the show, just attending and networking with other attendees can help your fan base grow.

4. Don’t allow huge gaps between episodes or between seasons.

Just like bloggers need to be consistent with their posting schedule, it’s important for your web series episode to come out on a consistent basis. For most, this means every week during a season, with possible longer gaps between seasons. Once you have the millions of fans some series have, you can easily come back after six months or even a year of being off the air. If you’re new, though, or not yet super popular, this kind of gap can kill any momentum you have.

5. Get viewers involved.

Lastly, consider getting your viewers involved in some way. Hannah Harto from My Drunk Kitchen, Jenna Marbles, and lots of other web series creators take viewer questions and answer them on air. The Guild was initially funded by viewer donations, and today, you can start a Kickstarter or Indiegogo campaign. You can even consider getting a viewer to be part of an upcoming episode, and I’ve seen some series that allow viewers to vote in a poll regarding what should happen to characters. If I’m part of your web series in some way, I’m definitely going to be more interested to see what happens.

Composing Your Video Shot: The Rule of Thirds

Author:

The artistic composition of your shots can instantly make a video look professional – or, unfortunately, like you don’t know what you’re doing. We’ve already gone over some composition tips for shooting emotional video in the past, but today, I wanted to highlight a really important design concept that all beginners can use: the rule of thirds.

The rule of thirds can be used for any kind of shot, but I personally find it most helpful for interviews and (in photography) portraits. Basically, if there’s a person in the video, this technique is going to help you set up your camera to get the most professional-looking shot.

Here’s a quick video that explains the rule of thirds. It’s super simple, so even if you’re just starting out, don’t be intimidated to try it out!

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NbGDDDcM-k&[/youtube]

Want more great video education? Check out the web TV and video track at NMX!

How to Set Up Lighting for a Video Interview

Author:

If you’ll be interviewing subjects in your videos, using the proper lighting is important for a professional-looking quality. One of the best set-ups to use is three point lighting, which uses a direct key light, filler light, and a back light. This kind of lighting allows you to see the subject’s face clearly, without any stark shadows, and it also makes the subject stand out from the backdrop.

For more information about three point lighting for video interviews, along with diagrams of your lighting set up, check out this video:

If you’re on a budget, don’t worry; you can still do three point lighting without the fancy equipment. Use the same general concept and principles with whatever lighting equipment you do have.

Want more great video tips? Check out the web TV and video track at New Media Expo in Las Vegas this January.

How to Use Camera Techniques for Emotional Filmmaking

Author:

Camera shots in your favorite movies, television shows, and web series aren’t random. With the right shot, you can begin to elicit emotion in your audience before your characters ever say a word. These are techniques you can do with any kind of camera, and they’re completely free; you don’t need fancy equipment to make the shots happen (at least most of the time). So what are your options and how do these kinds of camera techniques psychologically affect that viewer? Here’s a great video from Film Riot that explains the relationship between emotion and the shot you choose:

Remember, although this video is talking about pulling emotions during a work of fiction, you can use these same techniques if you’re creating non-fiction videos as well, such as interviews and tutorials. Playing around with camera placement can make scenes feel extremely different, so try a few options to get that overall video tone you really want.

Video Trick: Smooth Panning Using Rubber Bands [Video]

Author:

Not every trick to shooting professional video has to include the purchase of a high-cost tool or fancy editing software. In fact, sometimes, the answer is a “tool” you already have – in your junk drawer of all places!

Check out this very quick video on creating a smooth panning motion using nothing more than a rubber band. If you’re a beginner at creating videos (like me!), little budget-friendly tips like this can be lifesavers, right?

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/890329[/vimeo]

Check out the rest of our Web TV category for even more great tips like this one – and remember, we have an entire track at New Media Expo for people producing videos, so make sure you’ve grabbed a ticket to the show if you haven’t already!

How to Create a Slow Motion Video Effect Using Only Images

Author:

Adding special touches to your videos can make all the difference between a project looking super professional and looking like every other amateur video out there. Luckily, you don’t need a ton of special equipment to get started. Have you checked out this tutorial on creating a white background, for example? If you take the time to learn the tips, your videos can look stunning.

Another tutorial I wanted to share with you is this one about how to create a slow-motion effect. You don’t even need video for this! Using only images, you can create a really cool slow motion video. Check out some great examples and learn how to do it yourself:

Now that you know the basic technique, get a little creative! The possibilities are endless. How will you use this in your videos?

How Can I Find Time to Blog? [Video]

Author:

Without a doubt, one of the biggest challenges all bloggers have is making the time to blog. Even if you never procrastinate and even if you are a pro at time management, there are only 24 hours in a day. We want to blog, but we want lives as well. Or at least sleep. The truth is, bloggers who spend every waking minute working on their blog still often feel like there aren’t enough hours in the day.

So what can you so to find more time to blog? In this quick video, BWENY speaker Dino Dogan from DIY Blogger gives you three great tips about finding the time to blog. Check it out, and then read on because I want to give you a few of my own tips as well.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRDj1JcJODE[/youtube]

Dino’s tips – stop doing frivolous things, diversify, and integrate blogging into your life – are fantastic. To add to those tips, here are a few of my own:

  • Use formulas. I recently posted about Nate Rigg’s advice to use formulas to make yourself a more efficient blogger, and I wholeheartedly agree with this advice. You don’t want to be so formulaic that you’re boring, but having a formula as a starting point definitely can help you be a faster blogger.
  • Post Q&A interviews. People love answering questions because it is human nature to want to talk about yourself. When you post interviews, all you have to do is come up with some good questions, send it to your interviewee, and they’ll write the bulk of the content for you. It’s a definite time-saver.
  • Be personal. Not every blogger feels comfortable being super personal, but it’s often faster to tell a story from your own experiences on your blog than it is to write a more formal post. Again, it goes back to the fact that everyone likes to talk about themselves (yes, even you and I).
  • Use your moments of downtime. This relates to Dino’s advice to integrate. Look for those moments in life where you’re typically waiting for something and doing nothing and figure out how to be a productive blogger in those minutes. Waiting for the dentist? Blog. Waiting for the kids outside of the school? Blog. Waiting for the microwave to heat your lunch? Blog. All of those minutes here and there can really add up, and smartphones/tablets make blogging on the go really easy.
  • Hire help. As your blog grows, you can post more content in less time by hiring contributors or a virtual assistant to help with tasks like tagging, formatting, and distributing. You’ll shell out some money, but these options may be more affordable than you think.

Now it’s your turn – leave a comment with your best tip for finding time to blog even when your life seems super busy! What works for you?

BlogWorld New York 2012: Views from the Show, Day One [Video]

Author:

If you’re at home wishing you we at BlogWorld, we has a special treat for you – a quick video showing views from the show and talking to some awesome attendees and speakers about what they love about BlogWorld. Check it out, and don’t forget that you can still come on down to the Javits Center in New York to join us or pick up a virtual ticket to get access too all of the recorded sessions from the comfort of your own home.

Shout out to Srinivas Rao for helping us shoot this video.

Learn About NMX

NEW TWITTER HASHTAG: #NMX

Recent Comments

Categories

Archives