Looking for Something?
Posts Tagged for

Podcasting & Radio

10 Podcasting Pet Peeves (and Solutions)

Author:

I recently participated in an episode of The Podcasters’ Roundtable, hosted by Ray Ortega. The topic of the evening was Podcasting Pet Peeves, and as I was prepping for the show, I thought, hey! NMX article! With seven participants, I knew I wouldn’t get to mention all of the peeves I was coming up with, and I didn’t want my irritations and annoyances to go unmentioned. You deserve to know what my pet peeves are, after all.

Annoyed

Trust me, you do.

Note: A few items on the list here were brought up by other participants on the show, but this is my original list. Here we go!

Podcasting Pet Peeves

1. Poor production values. Shows with no editing, no music, no levels (volume) correction…if you can’t be bothered to put a little effort into the quality of your show, don’t be surprised if your audience dwindles away. It doesn’t take much effort, honestly. A great source for free, “podsafe” music is MusicAlley.com.

B. Overuse of profanity. I have nothing against profanity in and of itself. But I’ll turn off a show with no regrets if every third word of every sentence is profane. Look, it’s a scalpel, not a sledgehammer. A well-timed profanity can have a profound impact on a sentence. Don’t overdo it. And above all, be grammatically correct. If you don’t know how to use a word, don’t use it until you learn.

III. Consultants and how-to folks telling you… that there’s only one way to do things. There are soooo many ways to produce a podcast. There is no one right way. Oh, there are lots of wrong ways, but anyone who tells you that you have to do things only one certain way—especially if that person is charging you consulting money—should not be taken seriously.

Four. Consultants and how-to folks telling you…that if you’re not going to get the best equipment right away, you might as well not bother podcasting. DO NOT buy a $300 microphone before you’ve recorded your first show. Anyone that tells you to start off buying a lot of expensive equipment is probably also selling that equipment. It’s unnecessary. Start with a $30 USB headset from Walmart.

5. Putting on a Voice. I want to hear you talk like yourself, not like someone else—unless you can pull it off consistently. Most people can’t, I’ve found. By the end of the show, they sound more like themselves than the character they tried to create at the beginning.

Seis. Straying too far from the premise. If your show is about kangaroos and you spend the first 10 minutes talking about the new iPad you got, that’s bad. If your premise is that you’re funny, but you’re really not…well, that’s also straying from the premise. Be yourself, inject your personality and don’t be afraid to go on short tangents periodically, but stick to the premise.

Never deviate from the kangaroo.

VII. Too many ads, especially at the beginning of the show. If you’re running ads for five “sponsors” that takes up a full three minutes before your show begins, you’re doing it wrong. I’m turning you off, and I’m not the only one, believe me. Spread them out in the show. Take a thirty second break every 20 minutes. Don’t do them all at once.

H. Interviewers throwing softball questions. It’s not that I think every interview subject should be asked deep, intimate questions the whole time, but if all you do for 30 minutes is ask how the weather is where they are and plug their new project, that’s a terrible interview. Your guest is interesting, or else you wouldn’t have booked him-or-her. Show the audience just how interesting.

Nine. Not equating podcasting to other forms of media like TV and radio. Sure, it’s a younger medium. Sure, it’s not consumed by nearly as many people. Okay, there’s not nearly as much money in it. But it’s growing, and it’s not going away. It’s every bit as valid as other media.

X. Calling podcasting online radio. Radio is a discrete technology that has as much in common with podcasting as movies do with television. They share some common, broad elements, but they are separate technologies. Other complaints about it aside, I dislike Blog Talk Radio for this reason. Doubly so, in fact, because what they do doesn’t really have anything directly to do with blogging, either.

I’m very interested in what you consider a podcasting pet peeve, from the perspective of either a listener or a producer! Let’s talk pet peeves and solutions in the comments below!

Announcing the 2012 Podcasting Awards Winners

Author:

NMX is proud to have been the host for The 2012 Podcasting Awards. This awards ceremony, which was founded by Todd Cochrane (@geeknews), celebrates the best in podcasting. This  year, it was hosted by Leo Laporte from TWiT. Here are the 2012 winners:

Congratulations to all nominees and winners!

Also, an interesting challenge was set forth at the awards ceremony. At the end, Todd spoke about donating to the awards to keep them going for next year, and one podcaster (from Ardent Atheist I believe, though the packed room meant it was hard to see), shouted out a pledge to donate $100 and challenged every other podcast in the room to do the same.

Inspired by his pledge, Leo himself offered to write a check for half of the awards operating costs (about $3,500) if the podcasters would donate the other half in the next month. So look for a donation button to be coming soon on The Podcasting Awards website!

Finding Sponsors: Where Do I Start?

Author:

Finding and attracting sponsors to your podcast, blog or web show is one of the most difficult, yet potentially most lucrative, aspects of your business. Business? Yes. If you’re looking to make money doing what you love, your content is a business.

To that point, it’s important to treat your content creation that way from the very beginning – professionally. You never know who may be listenin/watching/reading, and you won’t get another chance to make an initial impression on someone… especially someone who may be willing to spend their money to work with you.

But if you are thinking about working directly with advertisers and sponsors, here are a few things you’ll need to do to get ready and get started:

  1. Be Prepared… for when opportunity knocks –  “Do as I say, and not as I do.” Believe it or not, you don’t always have to seek out sponsors. Sometimes they’ll come to you. And if (and when) they do, you need to be ready. When a potential sponsor called me in 2005 about advertising on my show, I had no idea about what I could offer, or what I should charge. It’s (almost) 2013, and times, opinions and the economy has changed, so you need to be ready. Put together a simple media kit (read the NMX article “38 Brilliant Bloggers Talk About Media Kits” by Allison Boyer to find out how to create one. Be sure and know your audience – not just the stats and numbers, but who they are, what they want, and what may appeal to them.
  2. Be Careful – Speaking of your audience, don’t take money from anyone that is willing to throw it at you. Be prepared to say “No.” Why? Because anyone who sponsors you must be one that is organic and relevant. Your audience TRUSTS you. That is paramount, and if it’s lost, it’s often lost forever. Be sure who you partner with brings value to your listener/reader/viewer. They believe in what you say and who you endorse, and remember that anyone that advertises with you is ultimately a reflection on you. If something goes bad, your audience will turn to you.
  3. Be Creative – Podcasting and blogging is not enough. You need to be everywhere. Always. It’s work. REAL work. But but doing more in multiple mediums, including videos, livestreaming, events, newsletters, etc., you are creating more opportunities for your potential sponsors. More opportunities gives you more creativity to share and spread the sponsor’s messages, and thus ultimately more income.
  4. Be Convincing – Podcast advertising just works. Plain and simple. But you may need to convince a potential sponsor and back it up with real data. How? Don’t worry – some of the heavy lifting has been done for you already. You’ll need to gather your own listener statistics (your hosting provider, such as Blubrry.com or Libsyn.com, can provide this for you). Overall, though, podcast advertising is very effective. For example, according to Edison Research in a study conducted in 2009: 80% of surveyed podcast consumers surveyed agreed that they “prefer to buy products from companies that advertise on or sponsor” the podcasts they regularly enjoy. Ninety-percent of respondents had taken some kind of action as a result of podcast advertising or sponsorship, and over 40% reported purchasing behaviors, which indicates that they are receptive to the right message, in the right context,” according to Edison Research Vice President Tom Webster. Survey Methodology: Respondents in this online survey were recruited using audio/video messages embedded in podcasts from some of the leading aggregators of downloadable media, including NPR, Wizzard, RawVoice and Revison3, during the 4th quarter of 2009. Source: The 2012 State of Podcasting Report.
  5. Be Confident– But remember that you must convince them to buy into YOU. So you need to be prepared to show them what your value is to their brand, why your endorsement to your loyal, very targeted audience is so valuable, and why you being an influencer to that audience helps determine your rate.
    • Determining what to charge is often the most difficult question of all. And because most of us are coming from a background where we’re not salesmen (unless you really were a salesman), determining and standing by what you value your sponsorship opportunities to be worth can be extremely challenging. So, where so you start? I suggest looking at the sponsorship opportunities you’ve established and looking at what you can deliver in terms of not only traffic, but conversions. Your sponsor is not just looking to potentially build their brand, but sell a product or service. Some ways to help determine your value and sponsorship costs:
      • Get comps – Look at other sites and shows and see what their rates are and for what they are offering. How do you compare in terms of traffic, reach and audience loyalty? Now look to other mediums in your niche, especially ones that a potential sponsor may already be advertising in. Research the costs of magazine ads, TV and radio spots, and even billboards. Find out where else the sponsor is already spending their money. And be confident in being able to convince the sponsor that what you can deliver is not only much more targeted and valuable, but trackable, changeable, unique and proven.
      • Be confident in who YOU are – Keep in mind that when you have built a loyal audience of listeners, viewers, or readers (hopefully all three), that the trust your audience has placed in you carries a huge value. A brand may broadcast a message about why their restaurant is great, but when your audience hears a review and endorsement from you, it carries a much different and powerful weight to it.
  6. Be Patient– Being patient means not just being patient in terms of waiting to attract, find and sign a sponsor, but with the sponsor themselves. For many brands, advertising in online media is a new venture for them, and very much outside their comfort zone. You will undoubtedly have to teach (and convince) them about the mediums, their opportunities and benefits, and why THEY need to be patient as well. Why? Because often times, advertising is a marathon and not a sprint, and they may not see their returns on the first day, or even for the first few weeks or months. So be patient while waiting for them, then while working with them, and why they may need to be patient but confident as well.
  7. Be Amazing– When you do come to an agreement with a sponsor, you need to set reasonable expectations on both ends. You need to outline what you can provide, and what the sponsor expects in return. Then do more. My belief is simple – Underpromise and Overdeliver. WOW your sponsor and they will remain a loyal partner.The most important part of finding and working with sponsors is to continue to be true to yourself, your mission and your audience. Keep them in mind first and always, as you begin to move your content creation and monetization in a new direction. Be prepared for many learning opportunities along the way, as well as some disappointments. But also be ready to invest a great deal of time and effort, and for the benefits that sponsorship can bring you and your audience. For more help, check out some previous NMX posts and articles:

Working with Sponsors for your Podcast [Video Series] 

Introducing Our Brand New Free Ebook: The Ultimate Guide to Blog and Podcast Sponsorship

3 Ways to Monetize a Podcast

The Number One Mistake You’re Making if You Want Sponsors

What are YOUR biggest challenges in finding and/or working with sponsors? Please leave your comments below, and I look forward to meeting you at New Media Expo in January!

Editor’s Note: If you want to learn more from Lou about getting sponsors, check out his session “7 Ways to Find, Sign and Profit from Sponsors for your Brand” at NMX in Las Vegas.

Podcasting in a Mobile World

Author:

Image Credit: Deposit Photos

When someone is looking at expanding their presence online (especially bloggers), I try to encourage them to look into starting a podcast if they have not already. I know that podcasting can seem like a daunting task and from that fear I know many people never give it a try.

I know that podcasting does take some work, but I also know that podcasting helps you reach people in a new way and many times people that otherwise may have never found out about you. And so to try and back this point up I thought it would be a good idea to look at a few statistics of the potential audience as a whole.

The Reach Of Mobile Devices

With the rise of mobile devices, it has opened up new possibilities for podcasters (or potential podcasters). Here are some of those interesting statistics when it comes to using some sort of mobile device:

  • Earlier this year it was found that about 43% of Americans owned a smartphone (most capable of listening to a podcast) and that number is rising quickly
  • Number of Ipods sold – 350 Million
  • Number of iPads sold – 84 million
  • Number of iPhones sold – 250 million

Here is the thing, all of these statistics have gone up even more as more mobile devices have been added to the market, not to mention most of these mentioned were Apple products. Think of how many people use Android devices.

So why do these stats matter? Well I can say that most (if not all) of these devices listed above have the ability to play podcasts with them. And with the rise of Apple’s podcast app, Stitcher’s App, and Dog Catcher or Pocket Cast for Android, it is already evident that people are taking advantage of podcasts today.

Think of all of the people driving to work in a car. In 2011 it was calculated that 100.3 million people drive to work alone in their car. More than likely they are listening to something during that time and it could be music, but it could also be a podcast.

From some of the statistics I tried to find it appears that there are 25 million people who have gym memberships. And I’m sure that number is probably really low even to the amount of people who just exercise. Statistically, most people who exercise have a mobile device of some kind that plays audio for them while they workout.  It is true that they might be listening to music, but they also could be listening to a podcast.  Talk about a great opportunity for fitness podcasts.

But even if we were to step back and think about all of the people working at their desks somewhere, a podcast would be something great to listen to during that time or some other daily activity.

The main point is that there is an increasing amount of accessibility to listen to podcasts for people today. With the rise of mobile devices, people can listen to podcasts anywhere. So why not give podcasting a try so that others get a chance to listen to your message and brand?

Editor’s Note: To learn more from Peder about starting a podcast, check out his NMX session this January called, “The Top Reasons Why Bloggers Should Launch A Podcast.” There’s still time to register!

10 Ways to Embrace your Global Audience

Author:

You are podcasting to your niche, in your own language, and then suddenly one day when checking your stats, you find out that you have listeners in Johannesburg, Bangkok, The Faroe Islands or Copenhagen.

This is the time to do the happy dance. But also the time to think – and speak – with a global mind set.

The United States of America is a melting pot of cultures, languages, political and religious orientations, time zones and interests.

But the U.S. of A is not the whole world. If your topic is global, there is a good chance you will have listeners in Sweden, Belgium, Scotland, Poland, Indonesia and Japan.

When you address a global audience you have two options:

  1. Ignore them and assume they understand your (American) way of thinking and living.
  2. Acknowledge them, tailor your content to suit them too, and engage them on their terms.

How?

Here are 10 ways you can embrace a global audience:

  1. Do your research. Look it up and find out how your content fits your audience. Don´t make them feel left out when you talk about American elections, sports events, openings, holidays, etc.
  2. Talk about things that are truly global and universal. If your podcast is about film or a TV series, make sure they have been released outside the U.S. Like Star Wars, Mad Men, American Idol, Lost, etc. Books like Harry Potter are global, but a lot of other books have not been released outside the U.S.
  3. Be aware that words don´t mean the same outside the U.S. Even between U.S. English and British English there can be remarkable differences, which can cause misunderstandings (e.g. football in Europe is soccer, Thanksgiving is an American holiday, Mother´s Day is not celebrated the same day all over the world).
  4. Engage your audience. Ask them to share what it is like in their lives. The weather, the culture, politics, habits, time zones, holidays, Black Friday etc.
  5. Don´t be too salesy. Many countries outside the U.S. are not so open toward commerce, sponsoring, commercials or advertisements.
  6. Consider getting a co-host who is not American. This can help closing the gap between you and listeners outside the U.S.
  7. Include their feedback. Each country has its own iTunes Store and make sure you get reviews of your podcast from all countries.
  8. Translate your show-notes into other languages. This will also enhance your searchability.
  9. If you livestream your episodes, consider scheduling so listeners overseas can join you at least sometimes.
  10. Be tolerant with your listeners. Many of them don´t speak or write your language too well. They have different ethics and manners, expressions and sense of humor. But they are still good people and they are today’s listeners and tomorrow’s friends.

Want to learn more? Be sure to come to the NMX panel I’ll be moderating, entitled “How To Effectively Communicate To A Global Audience” in January. This panel of experienced podcasters will share their experiences with podcasting to a global audience. In very different ways they are communicating with their listeners with a very global mindset. The panel includes:

Matthew Workman is American, but fell in love with a remote group of islands thousands of miles from the U.S. The Faroe Islands Podcast is an extraordinary meeting between an American and Faroeses.

Farnoosh Brock is of Iranian origin and that is one of the reasons she has been thinking global since she started podcasting about communication and personal career in her Prolific Living podcast.

Mark Pentleton started teaching Scottish school children, but since 2004 he has been building a worldwide language podcast network, Radio Lingua, and helped others speak French.

Hope to see you at the panel!

Nerdist’s Chris Hardwick is Coming to NMX in Las Vegas!

Author:

True story: I’m so excited about this NMX announcement that I can barely write this post. So I’ll just get right down to the big news: NMX is proud to welcome Chris Hardwick from The Nerdist Podcast and The Talking Dead as a keynoter to our 2013 show in Las Vegas this January!

Chris has built a new media empire – or as he so fondly calls it, a “nerd media empire.” He started his nerd website and podcast in 2008. Along with co-hosts Jonah Ray and Matt Mira, the podcast features guests ranging from Mythbusters‘ Adam Savage to Larry King to the cast of Doctor Who.

Since it’s inception, Chris has partnered with Peter Levin (GeekChicDaily) to form Nerdist Industries, and what started as a single podcast has since turned into an entire network of podcasts, a YouTube channel filled with premium content, the Nerdist News newsletter, and even a TV show on BBC America.

Nerdist Industries is now the digital division of Legendary Entertainments, where Chris and Peter serve as co-presidents.

You also might know Chris as the host of The Talking Dead on AMC, a weekly talk show-style program that airs after The Walking Dead every week. The show, which he recently announced would being expanded to a full 60 minutes instead of having the previous 30-minute time slot when returning in February, features fans’ quotes and questions via social media, an online poll to go with the episode every week, and continues online for 15-20 minutes after the television program ends. So, it’s combining the online and offline world in a way that few other programs do.

Oh, and Chris is also a writer for Wired Magazine. And hosts events like Course of the Force, an annual Comic-Con lightsaber relay. And filmed a Comedy Central special, Chris Hardwick: Mandroid. Really, what doesn’t this guy do?

I might have a little nerd crush, in case that wasn’t obvious!

You definitely don’t want to miss Chris’ fireside chat with Leo Laporte at 4 PM on January 7, 2013 at NMX! If you haven’t purchased tickets yet, you can register right now at the NMX event site. Register by Friday, December 14 to save up to $200 on your ticket!

 

Note from Rick Calvert, NMX Founder: I am a HUGE WALKING DEAD FAN and love watching The Talking Dead after the show every week. I am guessing a lot of you are fans, as well. I can’t wait to see if Chris can share any inside news on the show’s return in February. Maybe even bring us a sneak preview?

Favorite line from the last show (which was a tweet from a fan) “If you put Merle, The Governor and Hershel together you have an actual Pirate.” I almost fell out of my chair. What is your favorite line or scene from the show this season?

The NMX Podcasting Track

Author:

At New Media Expo in January we have incredible sessions planned for podcasters, bloggers, and web TV/video producers. If you’re already a podcaster or want to get started, you’ll find amazing sessions from some of the top leaders in the industry.

For an overview of our podcasting track, see below. To learn more about the speakers and the session takeaways, visit our podcasting page. We hope to see you at NMX in Las Vegas, January 6-8!

 

Sunday, January 6, 2013

  • Video Podcasting – What You Need To Know To Get Started with Perry Lawrence
  • The Top Reasons Why Bloggers Should Launch A Podcast with Peder Aadahl, Jenn Swanson, Dustin Hartzler, and PJ Jonas
  • How to Create Amazing Interviews for your Podcast with Jaime Tardy
  • How To Effectively Communicate To A Global Audience with Karin Hoegh, Mark Pentleton, Farnoosh Brock, and Matthew Workmann
  • How to Create New Content & Think Outside the Box When Podcasting with Craig Duswalt
  • How To Market Your Podcast & Grow Your Audience with Cliff Ravenscraft

 

Monday, January 7, 2013

  • Audio Podcasting: Doing It All From Your iPad with Rob Walch
  • Tips and Techniques for Building a Successful Fan Podcast with Darrell Darnell, Jay Glatfelter, Jack Glatfelter, and Jason Cabassi
  • Quit Your Job And Start Podcasting with Dan Patterson
  • The Benefits of Being The First To Podcast Within Your Niche with Cesar Abeid
  • Syndication: More than just RSS with Chuck Wood
  • What You Need To Know To Reach Your Audience On Facebook: Understand Facebook Edgerank for Content Creators with Erik J Fisher

 

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

  • How To Podcast Like A Pro And Never Edit – Say Goodbye To Post Production with Leslie Samuel
  • Learn about the Largest and Fastest Growing “Must Be On” Distribution Patforms in 2013 with Rob Greenlee, Rob Walch, and Todd Cochrane
  • How To Use A Virtual Assistant To Produce Your Podcast with Jonathan Shank
  • Tone and Emotion: The Keys to Compelling Podcast Fiction Narration with Renee Chambliss
  • Using Comedy to Humanize Characters and Hook Listeners in Audio Fiction with Abigail Hilton, John Mierau, Lauren Harris, Big Anklovitch, and Rish Outfield
  • Ten Legal Cases Every Podcaster, Blogger or Media Producer Should Know About with Gordon Firemark

 

Remember, there’s still time to join other podcasters from across the globe at the world’s largest new media conference. Register today!

Image Credit: Bigstock

 

Interview Advice from Larry King

Author:

Recently, Chris Hardwick of Nerdist interviewed someone who many consider to be the greatest interviewer of all time – Larry King. As a long time listener of this podcast, I can say that this is a departure for the normal Nerdist guest, but the conversation was amazing. Larry King talked a lot about his interviewing techniques, which can be extremely helpful for those of you who are also doing interviews, either on your podcast or on your blog (or even on video for that matter).

Check out the podcast, available now on the Nerdist website or on iTunes (show released on 10/15/12).

Here were some of my favorite quotes:

 

“One thing I’ve learned in the history of broadcasting (podcasting, whatever) is there are no rules.”

“I learned the secret of broadcasting, which is there’s no secret. Just be yourself. […] I never lie to the audience. You tell the audience the truth. You got a cold? Say you got a cold. Alright. You sneeze? ‘I just sneezed.’ It ain’t brain surgery.”

“I’m fascinated by the Q&A. I leave myself out of it. I never use the word I. My questions are short, usually one sentence, sometimes two. If it’s three sentences, it’s too long. […] That’s why I don’t like a lot of what I see on the air today, is these guys on the air are interviewing themselves. They just talk about the guest as a prop. The guest was never a prop to me. The guest is important to me. The reason for the show is why the guest is there. I’m the host. I’ll be back tomorrow.”

“When you have confidence, when the interview subject has confidence in the interviewer, you can go anywhere with them. You’re not a threat.”

“I don’t think there’s an inherent need to talk about your personal life, but I never met anyone who didn’t want to talk about what they do.”

“I have many opinions. I’m very political. I have opinions on a myriad of things. But I leave it at the door. I leave my ego outside the door. I have a healthy ego. I know I’ve been successful. I know I’m good at what I do. But when I’m on the air, my role is not what Larry King thinks. It’s what the guest thinks. And then I’m a conduit. I ask good questions, the guest through me comes to the audience and the audience makes up their own opinion. I’m able to do that. I don’t like everyone I’ve interviewed, but I do the best I can to learn the most I can about them.”

“When you start learning, you might as well die. I don’t know everything.”

Check out the entire podcast for more great gems from Larry King to help you be a better interviewer.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Help! I Hate The Sound Of My Voice!

Author:

Photo Credit: TheCult

“I hate the way I sound.”

I hear that complaint quite often. Many people do not like the sound of their own voice. It is quite common.

It is also quite natural to dislike the sound of you own voice when hearing a recorded version of it in your podcast. When you talk, the bones in your head vibrate adding to the qualities you naturally hear. When you hear a recording of your voice, those vibrations are absent causing your voice to sound different to you.

The natural bone vibrations also make you do some unnecessary acrobatics with your voice when using headphones. The bone vibrations combined with the enclosed nature of your headphones cause you to hear your “big announcer voice” in a much different way than the listener hears it. You tend to speak in ways you don’t normally speak in everyday conversation.

There are six steps you can take to make your voice sound more natural and get you on the path to enjoying the sound of your voice.

1. Notes, not script

The structure you use when you write is much different than the structure you use when you speak. You use different words. Your sentence structure will be different. The flow of the written word simply differs greatly from the spoken word.

As you are speaking, use notes instead of a full script. You will sound much more comfortable when speaking from the heart rather than speaking from the script. The flow and structure of your sentences will be much more natural.

Make note of the important points to include in your podcast. Hit those points within your show without reading it word for word.

2. Talk to one person

You will sound much more natural when you speak to one person rather than a group of people. When I am listening to your podcast, I want to feel like you are talking to me. If you include a call to action in your podcast, you want me to act upon that request. If you are talking to a group of people, I can easily think someone else will take action and I can do nothing.

If you are speaking directly to me, we will begin to develop a friendship. I will begin to feel like I know you. I will also feel like you care about me personally. Your delivery will sound much more conversational and less like a lecture when you speak to one person. This will help you become more comfortable with your own voice.

3. One ear headphone

Your voice will sound different to you when you listen to your voice through headphones. The enclosed space of the headphones amplifies your voice. The sound of your voice is also changed by the audio processing. The bones in your head vibrate differently when using headphones.

To help you sound more natural, remove one ear of your headphones. With only one cup on your ear, you are able to hear your voice more naturally with the free ear. You will also hear your voice in the context of the ambient room noise rather than through the vacuum of the headphones.

4. Turn your headphones down

If you are wearing only one cup of your headphones, turning the volume down will also help you sound more natural. With a lower headphone volume, you will better hear your natural voice. You won’t be fooled by the dominance of the headphone sound.

Use your headphones to make sure you hear the other audio included in your podcast. Make sure you can hear your music bed, intro, guest and other audio. However, make sure your headphones are not giving you a false image of your voice.

5. Don’t get sing-songy

Speak naturally. Do not attempt to sound like other announcers you have heard. Be yourself.

When you speak like an announcer, you begin to stretch and emphasize words unnaturally. Your speech begins to unnaturally bounce. When you listen to your recorded voice, you may sound like a puky disc jockey or used car salesman on a bad television commercial. Both lack warmth. They are hard to believe. You will sound less natural when you use the announcer voice.

Speak conversationally. Use a natural pace. Don’t use unnecessary emphasis on words. Speak as if you are on the telephone. These steps will help your voice sound more natural.

6. Review your show

The best way to become a more natural speaker is to review your show often.

When you listen to your show on a regular basis, you will become much more accustomed to hearing your voice in a recorded setting. You dislike your voice, because you are not used to hearing it outside of your own head. The more you hear your voice, the more natural it will sound.

It is possible to overcome the dislike of your own voice. You simply have to take steps to conquer it. It will take time to begin liking the sound of your voice. Be patient.

Remove some of the annoying qualities of your speech. Use notes, speak to one person and get rid of the sing-songy pattern. Polish up the product first.

Next, adjust the way your record. Use only one cup of your headphones. Turn the volume down a bit to hear your voice in its natural setting. Make minor adjustments until you get comfortable.

Finally, review your show. When listening to your own voice becomes habit, your recorded voice will sound much more natural to you. Review your show often.

Let me know if I can help you in any way.

Tell the truth. Make it matter. Never be boring.

What Podcast Listeners Really Want from Your Show Notes

Author:

Your podcast is recorded, edited, uploaded, and ready to promote. Now you can sit back and enjoy lots of traffic right? Well, maybe. But don’t forget about writing some show notes! Although blogging is my personal preferred medium, I’m starting to listen to more and more podcasts, and was even previously part of a weekly video game podcast for a few years.

What I’m discovering as I continue to explore the world of podcasting is that everyone has their own style for show notes. From a listener’s perspective, here’s what I like to see in show notes to enhance my podcast experience:

Links: Lots and Lots of Links

I asked my Twitter followers what they consider to be the top characteristic of good show notes, and without fail, everyone said links. I concur. When you’re listening to an episode and the host or guest talks about something but doesn’t provide a link in the show notes, it can be infuriating.

Yes, I can just Google it. But I shouldn’t have to. As a podcaster, your job is to entertain me or teach me, not make me do that work for myself. When I’m forced to look up something by myself, you also run the risk of me finding the wrong information and not really understanding your podcast.

Bottom line, to not have links in your show notes when necessarily is just lazy. It’s a must for any serious podcaster.

Bullet Points

I can appreciate a few paragraphs along with your episode. I’m a writer and I like to read. Just make sure that actual “notes” section of the page is written in bullet points or another format that is extremely easy to skim. I want to know really quickly whether or not the episode is going to interest me.

Times and Topics

Something I’ve noticed that some podcasters do is include not just a list of topics, but also a time when they start talking about this topic during the episode. I absolutely love seeing this as a listener. Sometimes, a specific podcast isn’t super interesting to me, but they are cover one topic that I love or talking to a special guest I want to hear. If I can avoid listening to segments that don’t interest me, I’m a happy camper.

Advertisement Information

Yes, believe it or not, I want ads. If you talk about something on your show, even if a commercial, it might interest me, so I want to know where to find more important about the company. Make sure you note when something is an affiliate link, so I’m not caught off guard. It’s also helpful if you note whether you use the product/service yourself and recommend it or if it’s just a sponsor and you have no opinion on whatever they’re advertising.

Having links to sponsor’s sites in your show notes is not only good for your readers, but it also adds additional value for your sponsors. In some cases, you can up your ad prices significantly or make a lot of affiliate money if you include a link.

A Brief Note About the People in this Episode

Don’t take for granted that I know who you are just because this is your 193rd episode. It might be the first one I’m listening to. At the top of your show notes, include a brief line about each host and guest on the podcast. Don’t assume that new listeners will seek out this information themselves.

Explanations of “Inside” Jokes

I absolutely hate it when I don’t understand a joke and it isn’t explained to me. You can certainly strengthen your community by having inside jokes and references only they “get” because it makes them feel like part of a club, but share that secret handshake with your brand new listeners too. Link to the episode where the joke originated and give a brief explanation.

Pictures

The best show notes out there have images. As I’m following along with your podcast, I want to see what you’re talking about. Of course, podcast listeners don’t always have show notes in front of them, so you can’t rely on visuals, but having images where relevant is a nice touch.

Your turn to tell us what you want from show notes. Whether you’re a podcaster yourself or just an avid fan, what do you look for in show notes? What makes some podcasters’ show notes better than others? Leave a comment!

Learn About NMX

NEW TWITTER HASHTAG: #NMX

Recent Comments

Categories

Archives