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6 Things an NMX Veteran is Doing to Prepare for the Event

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After months of preparation, it’s almost time for the New Media Expo event in Las Vegas. I know that the show management folks have been working hard, exhibitors have been preparing thier displays and products, and my fellow speakers have been crafting their presentations.

Serious Chimping at BlogWorldHaving attended New Media Expo a few times previously (when it was known as BlogWorld), here’s what I suggest to attendees to help them prepare for an event like this:

  • Identify Sessions of Interest – check out the schedule of presentations for the event, and skim through the various options available. Read the descriptions and speaker bios for the ones that sound promising, and make a tentative plan of which sessions will be most helpful for you.
  • Connect with Those You Want to Meet – if there are speakers, exhibitors, or other attendees that you want to meet, hopefully you’ve already made some connection with them. Interact with them on Twitter, comment on their blog, or send them an email so that they can get to know you a bit.
  • Prepare Business Cards – you’ll want to make sure that you bring business cards to the event. As digital as we’ve become, a business card is still a great way to share contact information with someone new. Make sure that you have plenty of cards and that they make it into your suitcase.
  • Look at Parties – we’ve seen a few parties announced thus far, and as we get closer to the event we’ll probably hear of additional gatherings or meetups. Just like you’ve identified sessions of particular interest, figure out which parties are going to be on your roadmap to help you make connections.
  • Figure Out Your Non-Conference Life – while we’re in Las Vegas taking in the NMX goodness, the rest of the world will go on. You’re going to receive email. Folks will be coming to your blog looking for something to read. People will continue to buy your products and services. Have a plan in place so that “real life” will go on while you’re enjoying NMX. Perhaps this means pre-scheduling articles for your blog. You might need to dedicate some downtime at the conference for responding to email in a timely manner. If you have coworkers, make arrangements for them to handle things while you’re out of town.
  • Get Plenty of Rest and Arrive Healthy – most of your time at New Media Expo is probably going to be spent on the go, meeting others, listening to presentations, attending parties, or otherwise not resting. In the few days before the event, try to get plenty of sleep. Be sure that you’re eating well, and it wouldn’t hurt to take plenty of vitamin C.

What other tips or suggestions do you have for others who are getting ready for New Media Expo? Leave a comment below and share with us all!

13 Ways to Make Sure You Get Your Money’s Worth from Your Next Conference

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conference session Have you ever been to an industry conference where you ponied up as much as a thousand dollars or more and the conference really sucked? Can I tell you something? Now, this may sting a little bit so do yourself a favor and strap on your big boy or girl pants and get ready. If it sucked, it was all your fault.

I know, I know. You didn’t book the speakers or schedule the keynotes. You weren’t in charge of the venue. You didn’t choose the subject matter. In fact, other than buying a ticket and showing up with your iPad and your fired up Twitter account, you had nothing to do with it, right?

Exactly my point.

I don’t care how much it cost you, how many people were there, where it was located, what venue it was in, who was speaking or what company it was run by. The success of that event for you is in direct proportion with the effort you put into it.

Here are the facts. You are thrown into a room with speakers that are oozing value and want to share it with you. Attendees that are there to learn are also scouring the place looking to meet new people within their industry. Vendors are paying a lot of money for a mere few minutes of your time just to show you what they do.

There are opportunities everywhere. If you missed them, you blew it.

But you don’t have to blow it next time. That’s what this article is about. It’s 13 of the best little bits of advice I have to give you to make sure your next conference is an overwhelming success. Whether I am there as an attendee or a speaker this is the mindset I have when I walk into that room. And this is why I always leave with more value than anyone else there. It works. Trust me.

1. Bring 25 Business Cards with You Each Day

No more. No less. I know this goes against conventional wisdom which states that you should bring two for every person within a 25 mile radius of the convention hall. Don’t. If you bring a lot of cards you are going to want to give them all out. That’s when you become that guy. You know that guy. The one handing out business cards as if he was dealing blackjack. Nobody likes that guy. Nobody respects that guy. And nobody remembers that guy. By bringing only 25 cards you are forced to seek out and create 25 quality relationships throughout each day. That means spending more than just a few minutes with someone. It means really discovering who they are. It means telling them something interesting about yourself instead of attempting to sell them. This is called building a relationship. Wouldn’t you rather have 25 new friends instead of 1,000 less business cards?

2. Eat Lunch in the Conference Center

I don’t care if you bring your lunch or go out and get something and bring it back. There is no eating outside of the convention center. Even if it’s a nice day. You aren’t likely to find a small empty table with one chair or a quiet corner that nobody else knows about inside which means you are going to have to sit with a bunch of strangers. It’s a great opportunity to stretch outside of your comfort zone and build a few new relationships.

3. Be Friends with the Ushers that Check You in at the Door.

You know those folks that stand in front of the door to check you in to each track? Well, believe it or not they are human beings! And they have cool stuff like feelings and personalities! Get to know each of them…sincerely. Be nice to them. Joke around with them. Have a little fun with them. Make them smile. The benefit? You will meet some nice people. And there may be a time or two where you are let in early or allowed into a sold out track while everyone else is turned away. Hey, friends hook each other up. Just be sincere. Like most people, they can smell a skunk a mile away.

4. Sit in the Front Row

If this were a concert you would knock over women and children to get to the front row. Yet at a conference, you tend to find the “safe” seat. The one towards the back with easy access to the exit. Instead, force yourself to sit in the front row for each track. Sitting in the front row assures that you aren’t going to drift into lala land, check your e-mail, play Angry Birds or partake in a host of other attention stealers while the speaker is talking. You have no choice but to be totally present. An active listener. You know…the reason you came here in the first place.

5. Clear Your Entire Schedule for the Week

A lot of stuff goes on during the week of the conference. Parties, keynotes and various after hours hangouts are as much a part of the conference as the tracks themselves. I once missed a really good keynote and networking party because I booked a speaking engagement well after the last track not realizing there would be some cool after hours stuff going on. I missed out. Trust me, it’s better to just clear your entire schedule and make room for anything that might come along.

6. Schedule Your Sessions One Day in Advance

The night before the first day, read through every track on the schedule. You can usually find them posted on the conference website. If not, get there at least an hour early. Pick the top two tracks you want to attend in each time slot for the first day only. Put them on your calendar by adding a 1 for your first choice and a 2 for your second. Make sure you include the track name, speaker and room number as well. If for some reason you either don’t like the track, it was cancelled or the room is full, head over to your second choice. At the end of the day just repeat by creating your schedule for the next day. Just be sure to only schedule one day at a time in case you catch a new speaker or subject matter that you now want to check out the next day.

7. Be the First to Ask a Question

Most tracks end in a Q&A session which tends to result in a blown opportunity for a majority of the room. I don’t get it. The speaker is likely someone that you have been hounding on Twitter for months in an attempt to get their attention and yet now that you have it the little voice in your head tells you not to get up and ask. Don’t listen. Being the first to ask a question gives you an opportunity to introduce yourself not only to the speaker but to a room full of like-minded people. If that doesn’t sell you, this might. A speaker’s biggest fear is that uncomfortable silence that comes after asking for questions and no one jumps out of their chair. A lot of speakers tend to reward those brave souls that step up first by giving away copies of their book or free admission into their programs. Free stuff is awesome.

8. Seek Out the People Running the Conference

Get to know the people behind the curtain. They are usually pretty awesome. Sometimes not, but in my experience, pretty awesome covers it. The reason I am writing this post is because I got to know a few of the people that ran BlogWorld and grew to really like them. I get the feeling that I’m one of their favorite people in the whole wide world as well. (The previous statement cannot be confirmed or denied at this time.) The only thing I would caution you with here is not to get to know them with the expectation of getting something in return. Life doesn’t work that way. Get to know them because they are cool people with a cool job. If you get some insight or a foot in the door along the way make sure that it is because they recognized that you have a lot of value to offer. Not because you’re a suck-up.

9. Don’t Tweet During the Tracks

I know this is not a very popular one. Sorry. I’ve watched too many people come to these things and stare at their Twitter screen waiting for the speaker to say something profound. And then spend the next few minutes trying to figure out a clever way to cram it into 140 characters. Ultimately they end up missing a bunch of other stuff that gets said in the meantime. Stop. Take good notes instead. Write down the good quotes and then during a break you can Tweet away. Sure, you may not be as timely as some others but more importantly you didn’t miss anything. Ultimately that’s what counts! Your Tweet only lasts for a few minutes. The knowledge you pick up by actually paying attention can last a heck of a lot longer.

10. Follow Each Speaker on Twitter

After each track, make sure you are following the speaker on Twitter and give them a shout out. Thank them by pointing out one solid thing that you picked up from them. First, it’s a nice thing to do. The speaker likes to know that they have reached their audience. Second, it’s a good way to get on their radar. Bonus points if you asked them a question during the Q&A so they recognize you when you Tweet them!

11. Visit and Speak with Every Single Vendor

The majority of these conferences have an area set aside for vendors to have a booth and pitch their wares. Most of us tend to stop by the booths with the best swag. But you’re not most people. Not anymore. Rather than just roaming around and stopping at one or two vendors, start at the beginning and visit each one. Don’t stop until you have talked to every single vendor. It will give you a chance to see what other companies are doing. Who knows, you might even find some synergy with a company that you normally would never have come across. Heck, you might even meet some cool people. And if all else fails, you’ll end up with a new wardrobe of free t-shirts and squeezy balls with someone else’s logo on it.

12. Get Yourself Interviewed

Often times you will see folks with cameras or podcasts looking to interview speakers and attendees. Pretty much anyone with half of a personality. Do whatever you can to get in front of them to be interviewed. I know, you aren’t camera material. Even more reason to get out there. It’s a great opportunity to practice being interviewed. It may even turn into a good promo piece for you! Free promotion! And who is going to turn down free promotion!?!?

13. Shut Off Any Work Related Stuff

Leading up to the conference make sure that you have any necessary systems in place that allow you to leave work behind for a few days. Don’t waste the time in between tracks distracted by work related e-mail or calls unless it’s an emergency. That time should be spent networking, visiting the vendors, going to the book signings, talking to speakers, meeting the people running the conference and all of the other stuff we have been talking about up until now. It’s a great opportunity and it’s only around for a few short days. Use your time wisely.

The easy part is done. Now comes the hard part. Actually doing it. Regardless of whether you are a newbie or an old pro at attending conferences, I challenge you to take each of these on and see what kind of results you get at your next conference.

Do you have any tips that help make the conferences you attend a big success? If so, leave them in the comments below and let’s keep the conversation going!

Five Questions with Ray Ortega & Interview with Deb Ng [BlogWorld TV]

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Deb NG

Deb NG talks planning for BlogWorld & New Media Expo

This week on BlogWorld TV, we talk with Deb Ng about her role at BlogWorld & New Media Expo. She talks about how she is hand writing thank-you notes to everyone who registered. We also learn about some prizes you could win while at BlogWorld. Since Deb used to live in New York, she knows a bit about this summer’s host city.

“New York is a totally different vibe than Los Angeles and Las Vegas. They always say the west coast is more laid back than the east coast. I think that’s true. To me, I lived in New York for more than 30 years. When people go to conferences, it’s just another day at the office,” says Deb. “I am looking forward to meeting a totally new group of people, who have a different way to go about this conference thing.”

Ray Ortega will be at BlogWorld & New Media Expo

Ray Ortega will be at BlogWorld & New Media Expo

Also on this episode, I also talk with Ray Ortega from the Podcasters Studio, where he answers five questions for us and talks about what he is expecting during his first BlogWorld & New Media Expo trip. Not only is he attending, he is also speaking.

All this, and your tweets as read by a bad Jerry Seinfeld impersonator.

[youtube width=”550″ height=”394″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4z_dDYX1L6o[/youtube]

Overheard on #BWEchat: Kids at Conferences

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This week, #BWEchat‘s topic was kids at conferences in a town hall type of setting with no special guest. I personally don’t have kids, but I’ve definitely been to conferences and conventions where kids were welcome  – and have had both good and bad experiences. Some of the questions posed this week included:

  • Does a con’s child policy affect your decision to attend? More or less likely to attend if kids are allowed?
  • Under what circumstances do you think professional conferences should allow kids?
  • Does it affect your business networking having your child with you?
  • As an attendee, are you concerned about kids disrupting conference sessions? What about as a speaker?
  • Does the age range of the children allowed at a conference matter?

The topic at hand definitely sparked some great conversation from parents and non-parents alike. Here were some of my personal favorite tweets from the night:

  • @karonwarren: I don’t think it matters who the conference is for; it’s a professional environment & should be conducted as such.
  • @LindsayDianne: Any conference that I go to, I’m trying to learn. For me, it’s more likely to be effective without having to parent.
  • @nlowell: I’m more concerned abt ‘entitled adults’ highjacking the panel than kids
  • @theresesquared: Kids can keep the audience and speaker on their toes. That’s for sure. If they’re bored you’ll know it.
  • @2xKnight: Clear guidelines for what to do with disruptive children would help. No matter the kid’s age.
  • @BlackCanseco: Kids can disrupt a conference but so can really annoying adults.
  • @AngEngland: I think that part of the responsibility of being a mother going to conferences is to have back-up plans in place.
  • @SherylLoch: The tip is start teaching your kids to sit & be quiet LONG before the conference. Start at like…birth.
  • @OneBrownGirl: I think that the rules for blogging are still being invented. What works at one conference might not work at another..vice versa

Thanks to everyone who came out for a great discussion on this topic! Next week, we’ll be talking about how to ad humor to your blog with special guest Jordan Cooper (@notaproblog), so I hope to see you all there. Remember, #BWEchat takes place every Wednesday at 9 PM EST, hosted from @blogworldexpo, so mark us on your calendar!

Why Should I Attend a Conference If I’m Just a Mom Blogger?

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Before I go any further, I need to clarify that no one is JUST a mom blogger. Regardless of what you blog about, you have a voice and we all have equal opportunity on the internet to share our voice. Now that we got that out of the way, why should you attend a blogging conference?

1. Because you are not alone.  You are not blogging in a vacuum. Having been to several conferences a year for the last 3 years, I know that meeting my blogging tribe in person has made a huge difference in my writing, my enthusiasm for blogging and in my own personal life. No matter how much social networking takes over our lives, there is no substitute for networking in person.

2. Because you will learn a lot. Every time I go to a conference, I learn so much, it would take years for me to implement it all. No matter how long you’ve been blogging, you do not know it all and you will learn from others at a conference.

3. Because you deserve a break. Attending a conference is an excellent excuse to get out of the house and away from your kids. I know you love your kids very much, but it is true, “distance makes the heart grow fonder.” That applies to children as well as spouses. I always come back from a conference feeling like I can take on the world. I know that my trips away have made me a better parent. It is also important for your kids to know that when you leave, you come back.

4. Because you will meet new friends. Some of my best friends I met online because of blogging. When you meet in person, there are none of those odd moments where you don’t know what to say. Regardless of how you met, you are friends and you have a history and you have a connection. You will also meet a lot of new friends and find new blogs to read. The more people you know, the more opportunities will come your way.

5. Because it will force you to get out from behind the computer. I am an introvert and quite shy, so I understand when someone says they are afraid to go to a conference. So am I. Every single time I go to a conference I am both excited and scared. But each time I go and I live through it, it’s another experience I survived and I’m stronger for it. I have even spoken at several conferences and I’ve loved it. You may surprise yourself.

Those 5 reasons are why I try to attend at a minimum 3 conferences every year. When I haven’t attended one in a few months, I get conference withdrawals. I now need to get out and connect with other bloggers.

If you are still unsure, try attending a smaller event near you and work your way up to a big conference like BlogWorld Expo. It is definitely worth the investment in time and money. If you give it your all, you won’t be disappointed. But remember, you get what you give.

Images from Microsoft Images. 

Conferences: It's All About the Shoes

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This is a post that’s probably more relevant to all my female readers out there, so my apologies in advance to the men in my audience. This is a post I just really felt I needed to write.

Because sometimes, I don’t know what is wrong with me. Seriously. Like to the point where I have to question whether my father’s jokes about the doctor dropping me when I was born really are jokes after all. I’m a smart person, and I read blogs posts written by smart people. It’s on every single “conference attendee tip list” out there: wear comfortable shoes.

And yet, there I sat at the hotel after a ten-hour day at the Philadelphia Convention Center, nursing my bleeding feet. Yes, that’s right. My toes and the back of my ankle were bleeding from not wearing the proper shoes. I also had blisters the size of small mountains and couldn’t feel my heels because they were numb from walking all day.

I’m a generally fit person, at least to the point where I don’t tire after just an hour of walking. I made the sensible decision to leave my heels alone. I’m 5’10, so I tower over people when I wear heels anyway. Still, when I looked at the two options in my suitcase – sensible, albeit boring, sneakers and cute ballet flats that I had just purchased the day before – I made the choice of style over comfort. How bad could a pair of flats me?

Bad. Super bad. Mega-intense-pain bad. Bad to the point where my feet were not just in discomfort, but I literally could barely walk. Sometimes, I don’t know what is wrong with me.

Since that conference, which was actually about three years ago now, I’ve attended multiple other events, and I always make a note of girls’ shoes. I’m not the only moron, apparently. At the end of the day, at least 25% of the girls I see walking around are doing so slowly and with a limp. Sometimes, I don’t know what is wrong with us.

Think back for a moment to any event you’ve ever attended in your niche. Of all the people you met or saw, do you remember what a single one of them was wearing on their feet? Unless someone wore something totally weird, it’s unlikely that you can think of a specific time when you noticed someone’s footwear. Yes, you might compliment someone’s shoes if you’re standing in line and notice they’re wearing something cute, but I bet you never once looked at someone’s shoes at a conference and thought, “Wow, they’re wearing sneakers. How boring.” If anything, you probably longingly wished you wore sneakers, too.

My point is this: the “wear comfortable shoes” tip is more than just a tip. It is a need. You need comfortable shoes just like you need a ticket to get into the event. As you prepare for BlogWorld Expo over the next few months, take some time to really think about which shoes you’re going to wear. Even if you plan on doing a lot of sitting, you’ll thank yourself if you dress for comfort.

Remember, comfort doesn’t have to be boring or ugly. If you’re into fashion or aren’t willing to compromise your style, spend some money on new shoes that are both comfortable and interesting. Mine are pictured above. Wear them in the weeks leading up to the event to break them in, and plan your outfits accordingly so you aren’t tempting to go for the stilettos as you’re getting dressed at the hotel.

Allison Boyer is a writer for BWE’s blog and the owner/manager of After Graduation. It’s true; she has the coolest sneakers of all time.

What Is The Next Big Event?

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Do you have an event, conference or meeting, besides of course our event which I just talked about, that you want us to know about?   CES was a huge event in Las Vegas last week, and our very own Rick Calvert and Patti Hosking was in attendance along with the reported 150,000 other people all wanting to see what the next cool thing was in consumer electronics.  We at BlogWorld & New Media Expo love to attnd these types of events and we plan to make sure we have someone that can make it to help promote our show and to also report on what we see in the industry and trends and news.  The problem is, it is tough for us to keep track of all of the events in our industry.

Mashable, RWW, TechCrunch and others all have calendars of events and we tend to keep our eyes on those lists to make sure we see all of the events that are reported in those industries, but event they don’t have a handle on all of them.  What I want to know is what are your events?  Are yopu running something that we shoudl attend?  Do you have a conference, or a show, or a trade event in an industry that doesn’t necessarily fit into the tech world or maybe it is on the fringe of social media, or other places you think we should know?  What about in other countries, are you planning on having a show in your city and in your country not in the United States?

With the number of categories our convention and trade show covers, with real estate, business, sports, military service, technology, monetization, politics, etc, etc.  What events are not being publicized that we should attend?  Leave a comment and URL here if you have an event we should notice.  I am also going to start compiling a list of events that are brought to our attention as we want to help you promote your event as much as our own.  If we can make a hub for people to come and find events in the new media world, we would love to help.

I think the next big thing that we may be attending is Affiliate Summit West again in Las Vegas.  Many of our friends and track leaders and speakers all attend that event on affiliate marketing.  Will we be seeing you there?

The 140 Characters Conference “Call For Speakers”

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Jeff Pulver wrote a blog post and sent out an email blast to all of the people interested in the 140 conference that will be taking place in NYC on April 20-21, 2010.  Jeff has done a great job of getting attendees to come out and hear from some of the best known people or in his case “characters” on Twitter.  The deadline for the call for speakers is January 22, 2010.  I am especially interested in how the nomination process works for him.  More of the information can be obtained from the email itself:

With today’s “Call for Speakers” I am looking for creative, out-of-the-box thinkers to come forward and pitch me something relevant they would like to present that has been effected by the emerging real-time, NOW Internet.

My hope is to attract not only established celebrities, members of the media and thought leaders who are now using twitter, but those who have become a celebrity, and a brand in their own right, through the creative and disruptive application that twitter continues to be.

I’m looking for first-hand accounts of how twitter is being used and the impact it is happening in the industry sectors this event is focusing on. My goal is to bring together a curated group of characters to both lead and contribute to the discussions. And this event isn’t just about twitter. Open for discussion are all platforms and applications which are effecting and contributing to the real-time internet experience.

I believe that 140 of the right characters can impact 140,000 online participants at the event. I saw this happen in 2009 at the New York, LA, London and Tel Aviv events, plus multiple #140Conf MeetUps held across the U.S.

I believe that the knowledge shared and learned at this event will help bring more people into the twitter ecosystem. The take aways from this event will provide the attending delegates knowledge, perspectives and insights to the next wave of effects twitter will have on business.

So please, think about what YOU could contribute to the dialog, and who you may know who would be interested in being part of this event.

#140conf is the twitter hashtag for the conference. I would appreciate your help in once again spreading awareness of the April conference to the people who you are connected with on your social networks.

What I hope to bring together is a gathering of people with a variety of backgrounds and together explore the future of where things are going and how to best prepare the community at large to get there.

If you are interested in speaking at: 140 Characters Conference, and or would like to suggest a speaker, please tweet your nomination to #140conf. I will be checking the twitter stream on an almost real-time basis for nominations. You can also contact me by sending email to: jeff@pulver.com. The deadline for speaking proposals is: Friday, January 22nd but the first to be nominated will be the first considered.

I am also looking for sponsors and for exhibitors to be part of our twitter showcase. My goal is to have a special section of the event just for applications, and a maybe this time a Best Of #140conf Award for killer apps. For more information about sponsoring and exhibiting, please contact me by sending email to: jeff@pulver.com

A new approach to the pricing of the #140conf events was announced last week. Click here to learn more about this.

For more information about upcoming #140conf events, please visit: http://140conf.com.

I will reach out and see if Jeff will give us an interview here of the process and other questions that will give more details of the conference.  Jeff if you are listening or reading here, how about a sneak peek under the hood of the 140 conference?

The 140 Characters Conference "Call For Speakers"

Author:

Jeff Pulver wrote a blog post and sent out an email blast to all of the people interested in the 140 conference that will be taking place in NYC on April 20-21, 2010.  Jeff has done a great job of getting attendees to come out and hear from some of the best known people or in his case “characters” on Twitter.  The deadline for the call for speakers is January 22, 2010.  I am especially interested in how the nomination process works for him.  More of the information can be obtained from the email itself:

With today’s “Call for Speakers” I am looking for creative, out-of-the-box thinkers to come forward and pitch me something relevant they would like to present that has been effected by the emerging real-time, NOW Internet.

My hope is to attract not only established celebrities, members of the media and thought leaders who are now using twitter, but those who have become a celebrity, and a brand in their own right, through the creative and disruptive application that twitter continues to be.

I’m looking for first-hand accounts of how twitter is being used and the impact it is happening in the industry sectors this event is focusing on. My goal is to bring together a curated group of characters to both lead and contribute to the discussions. And this event isn’t just about twitter. Open for discussion are all platforms and applications which are effecting and contributing to the real-time internet experience.

I believe that 140 of the right characters can impact 140,000 online participants at the event. I saw this happen in 2009 at the New York, LA, London and Tel Aviv events, plus multiple #140Conf MeetUps held across the U.S.

I believe that the knowledge shared and learned at this event will help bring more people into the twitter ecosystem. The take aways from this event will provide the attending delegates knowledge, perspectives and insights to the next wave of effects twitter will have on business.

So please, think about what YOU could contribute to the dialog, and who you may know who would be interested in being part of this event.

#140conf is the twitter hashtag for the conference. I would appreciate your help in once again spreading awareness of the April conference to the people who you are connected with on your social networks.

What I hope to bring together is a gathering of people with a variety of backgrounds and together explore the future of where things are going and how to best prepare the community at large to get there.

If you are interested in speaking at: 140 Characters Conference, and or would like to suggest a speaker, please tweet your nomination to #140conf. I will be checking the twitter stream on an almost real-time basis for nominations. You can also contact me by sending email to: jeff@pulver.com. The deadline for speaking proposals is: Friday, January 22nd but the first to be nominated will be the first considered.

I am also looking for sponsors and for exhibitors to be part of our twitter showcase. My goal is to have a special section of the event just for applications, and a maybe this time a Best Of #140conf Award for killer apps. For more information about sponsoring and exhibiting, please contact me by sending email to: jeff@pulver.com

A new approach to the pricing of the #140conf events was announced last week. Click here to learn more about this.

For more information about upcoming #140conf events, please visit: http://140conf.com.

I will reach out and see if Jeff will give us an interview here of the process and other questions that will give more details of the conference.  Jeff if you are listening or reading here, how about a sneak peek under the hood of the 140 conference?

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