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BlackBerry & Social Customer Service

Author:

… An Interview with David Armano and RIM’s Social CS Team

Research In Motion (BlackBerry), is one of the sponsors for BlogWorld 2010 and also an Edelman client (my employer), but what you might not know about them is that they are quite active in the social media space, especially when it comes to providing customer care in addition to tips on how BlackBerry fans can get the most of their devices. With over 154k followers on Twitter, the CS (customer service) group regularly engages customers out in the open in a variety of ways. I was able to catch up Michelle Kostya and Baldev Solanki who are two of the architects’ behind the social customer service efforts at BlackBerry.

DA: Blackberry offers support to customers in a variety of ways including online forums. Why did you extend this in places such as Twitter with @blackberryhelp?

MK: Due to the nature of the business, customers usually dealt with their carriers rather than directly with us. This meant that when we launched the forums we were able to truly connect with our customers in a way that wasn’t possible before. All of a sudden we had the ability to gather valuable feedback and work directly with our customers to solve their issues. By being able to help our customers immediately and by showing them neat tips and tricks we were able delight them! But, we recognized that just as not everyone will call to get help, not everyone will visit a forum to ask for help. It became our goal as the Social Media Support team to be where our customers were. Our Digital Marketing counterparts had set up channels on various social channels and customers were asking support questions – it only made sense that we were there to help!

DA: Doesn’t interacting with customers who may be frustrated with your products open the door to public displays of dissatisfaction? How do you manage the risks?

BS: On the contrary, every dissatisfied customer is an opportunity for us to provide a great support experience. The real risk is not engaging. Our goal is to always be professional and follow through. It is a great feeling to delight a frustrated customer and see them become a raving fan.

DA: You decided to take a somewhat personal approach to providing customer care in a social channel by putting the faces of the team behind the account vs. it being the single brand. Why?

MK: Customers service is about a 1:1 conversation. Even when you are talking about traditional customer service it is one person talking to another on the telephone. We wanted our followers to know that the team on Twitter are real people. So they sign their name on each tweet and have their pics up on the background. And, we are taking it offline too! At Blogworld two members of the team will be “live” at the BlackBerry booth providing on-site help and tips!

DA: In the traditional customer care model, success in channels such as call centers is often measured by volume and time per call. What are some of the ways you measure success?

BS: Sometimes defining success measures feels like a quest for the holy social media grail. We tweet a lot of tips so we use retweets as a measure of how useful the content is. In addition we treat positive tweets and thanks as a measure of customer satisfaction. On our forums, Accepted Solutions from the community is a good measure. Remember that some of the standard call centre metrics still apply. Response time and mean time to resolve are definitely things to track.

DA: @blackberryhelp isn’t the only social embassy you’ve built to help your customers get the most out of BlackBerry products. You also have the BlackBerry Help Blog. In the age of Facebook, Twitter and other “shiny objects”, what does a blog get you?

BS: Blogs are about sharing with authenticity. A good enterprise blog can help you really connect deeply with your customers in a meaningful way because the content is not only relevant but insightful and personal. I think most enterprises miss that point. When you do it right, your customers will walk away not only having learned something new but will also feel much more connected to your brand.

MK: Some of the CS staff already wrote how-to posts for Inside BlackBerry Blog and we discovered that these posts were incredibly popular. Our customers wanted to be better (or, the best!) at using their BlackBerry and these posts gave them the info they needed to do this – in a fun and personal way. As with all of the Inside BlackBerry blogs our intent is to get our readers the inside scoop – just focused on the know-how we have on cool tricks, shortcuts and how-to in more than 140 characters.

DA: What are some of the most common requests you get from BlackBerry users? Do your responses vary?

MK: There isn’t really a “typical” request coming to our @BlackBerryhelp team. They get 800 tweets a day from our 155,000+ followers and they range from technical questions to feature requests and from questions about release dates to conversational tweets asking the team how they are doing. So, yes our responses definitely vary although we do have some typical answers for more common requests. Plus, we have a huge library of helpful tips and tricks that we share throughout the day.

DA: What is the one piece of advice you would give to other major brands looking to help their customers leveraging social media?

BS: Don’t succumb to “Cheshire Cat Syndrome” (remember how confused Alice in Wonderland was in choosing a path?). Be careful of starting down the path of social media customer support if you don’t know where you want to end up. Define objectives first, and then try a pilot to limit the risk. A lesson learned from the trenches – most of the time in Social Media land, when you open a door, it’s really hard to shut.

MK: I would say the biggest piece of advice I have is that you need to recognize that customers don’t care what department you are from when they are talking to you via a social channel. A customer is just as likely to ask a technical support question, as they are to provide you with product feature requests, or post they are looking for a job at the company! No matter who “owns” the channel internally– you need a way to route feedback and respond when necessary to your customers. Participation in social channels means breaking down silos inside your business.

Michelle, Baldev, Thank you both for your time and insights. If you’re reading this and attending BlogWorld (and have a BlackBerry device), feel free to bring it to the BlackBerry booth to receive complimentary tips and general assistance from members of their customer service team.

BlackBerry Help:
Twitter: @blackberryhelp
Website: http://helpblog.blackberry.com/

David Armano:
Twitter: @armano
Website: http://davidarmano.com

Participate in the BlogWorld Video WalkAbout and Check Out Kodak’s New HD Video Camera!

Author:

Jeffrey Powers

BlogWorld 2010 Speaker
Digital Broadcasting Track
Saturday October 16, 2010
Time: 12:15PM to 1:15PM

We are happy to announce that the learning sessions are not just limited to the session rooms. Sometimes, you just have to get out in the wild and make your content.

In the session “Record Life at BlogWorld & New Media Expo”, we will be meeting at the Kodak booth on Saturday at 12:15 PM. Your guide – Jeffrey Powers from Geekazine.com will be explaining how to use a handheld digital camera to capture life at any event.

Jeffrey will talk about lighting, sound and how to capture the moment. You will then be sent off to do just that – capture the moment.

Don’t have a camera? That’s OK. Kodak’s newest HD video camera – the PlayTouch, will be available to borrow for this session, courtesy of Kodak. (Cameras are limited to 20. To reserve yours, claim a ticket at our Eventbrite for this session. If tickets run out, you can still attend with your own video camera!)

If you do have your own camera, bring it along, too. We will collect all the footage after an hour, then work on putting together a montage of BlogWorld & New Media Expo.

BlogWorld 2010 – Friday Night MashBash at Haze

Author:

Sponsors:


Lexmark

Along with the informative sessions and amazing exhibitions, a big part of BlogWorld is the networking. We all know a lot of that networking happens at night so with help from our fabulous sponsors we host fun-filled parties at some of the coolest venues in Vegas every night!

Our friends at The Light Group @lightgroup are hosting two of our evening events this year. The BlogWorld 2010 MashBash Friday Night Party will be held at the Haze Nightclub at ARIA Resort & Casino at CityCenter. If you have ever been to a MashBash you know they are great and this one could be the best one yet.

The party is open to attendees who purchase a Weekend Pass and Full Access Pass (details here)

Check out this description from the folks at Haze:

    Conceptualized and designed to mirror the success of existing Light Group venues, Haze Nightclub is a dramatic 25,500-square-foot cutting-edge space in where guests are challenged to question their sense of perception and reality. Haze Nightclub features over-sized props in the entryway, drawing guests to a grand central staircase which transports them to the mezzanine level where one can enjoy a birds-eye view of the action down below. The main dance floor, filled with beats from the world’s best DJs, is home to 100 square feet of interactive projection screens on a performance structure where impromptu surprise acts by world-renowned artists take place. Suede walls and plush surfaces speckle the weaving interior of this nightlife destination boasting a unique 20-foot wall of lights that incorporates the latest in technology. Haze’s revolutionizing sound system, designed by Avalon Sound, is the first audio system in the world to utilize the latest in sound technology that will create a music environment unlike anything Las Vegas has seen. Full color laser shows add to the sensory experience, creating a nightlife mecca that raises the standards of nightclubs around the world.


By the way we first learned about @lightgroup last year when their Interactive Marketing Director @ManyaS reached out to Rick on Twitter. A few DM’s later @lightgroup was locked in as the official host of all BlogWorld evening festivities. You can check out pictures from last year’s parties at The Bank and Jet here, here, here, here, here and here.

BlogWorld Attendees: Learn How You Can Attend a Cirque Show!

Author:

It’s almost here, my favorite time of year in Las Vegas – BlogWorld! Personally and professionally, BlogWorld has been a wonderful event and I know this year will be even better. For the past two years I’ve loved showing off our Cirque du Soleil shows to attendees, we have seven shows in Las Vegas now! So again this year I would like to invite bloggers to attend one of our shows in exchange for writing a review. Whether you’re experiencing Cirque for the first time or the tenth time, your Vegas trip is not complete without hitting one of our incredible shows.

To coincide with the BlogWorld parties at Aria on October 14 and 15, I’ve set up a block of tickets for Viva ELVIS, our newest show (7 and 9:30 p.m.) so you can check it out either before or after.

Tickets are also available on other dates for CRISS ANGEL Believe, Mystère, KÀ, Zumanity and LOVE.

A few things to keep in mind:

  1. To qualify you have to leave a comment on this post with:
    • The show you want to see
    • A link to where you’ll be posting your review (Your blog, podcast, YouTube, etc)
    • Your email address so we can contact you
  2. There is limited availability so be sure to sign up ASAP
  3. You have to be attending BlogWorld

For more info on Cirque du Soleil, follow us @cirque and experience us at Facebook.

See you at BlogWorld!

Jessica Berlin /@jessberlin
Social Media Manager for Cirque du Soleil

Introverted Networking: Party Crashing, Group Subversion, Social Survival Skills and TALKING TO GIRLS

Author:

by Jeremy Wright (CEO @ BNOTIONS.ca / Author @ http://nakeddating.tumblr.com)

ShyConferences are living, breathing organisms. They change year to year, and yet seem to maintain a core “ness”. They have personalities, social conventions, cliques and pacing. The SxSWness, for example, includes inserting yourself into groups, a focus on alcohol-fueled networking and a long history of waking up in the afternoon (which is fine since only first-years go to the sessions anyways).

BlogWorld’s “ness” is different. This is partly due to the locale being Las Vegas instead of Austin, but mostly because as an “organism” BWE is still young. As a result, much of the culture and social norms are still evolving.

In this (admittedly lengthy) post I’ll lay down some #science for you BWE (shorthand for BlogWorld Expo, Twitter #hashtaggery defined by #bwe10) first-timers. This post is specifically targeted at folk like yours truly who are introverts (either secretly or obviously).

BWE Social Norms

As an introvert, confidence often comes from knowing the social norms of a given situation or social group. When I don’t know anybody, don’t know how to act or I’m just flat out tired I can seem withdrawn, quiet or grumpy. If you’re anything like me, going into a situation (whether it’s a job interview, a first date or a conference), knowing the people, the norms and the expectations allows you to be just a bit more you. So, to help you out, here’s the braindump on how to surf the social wave that is BWE!

Note: If you’re ever unsure what to do, feel a bit lost, or just want to meet random people, shoot folk who are using the #bwe10 hashtag, or veterans like yours truly (@jeremywright) a tweet. People are almost always more helpful than you think they’ll be!

Braindump time! Here are 8 things that aren’t normal in normal life but are normal at BlogWorld:

  1. Introducing yourself with just your first name (vs a practiced schpiel)
  2. Waiting until someone asks for your business card to give it to them (like Chris (http://www.chrisbrogan.com/9-ways-to-rock-blog-world-expo/), I’m a big believer in only exchanging business cards if you expect to do business together, otherwise just follow each other on Twitter!)
  3. Having someone stop the conversation in order to send you an email, add you to twitter or tweet something you just said. Sad, but it’s become the norm to mix the online and offline worlds.
  4. Use “so what are you doing later?” (ahem, not in a creepy way…) as a means to get a group/individual to tag you along.
  5. Start an impromptu after party. Go with the flow if you get pulled in!
  6. Plan a very loose schedule (potential activities) and a firm schedule (appointments) so you can be free to float a bit more. Flexibility is sexy.
  7. Drag an unsuspecting n00b (that’s you!) along to a party, lunch, drinks, etc
  8. Walk up to your favourite social media douchebag celebrity and ask questions, hangout and be cool

In short, being introverted is totally normal and cool! #happydance!

That said, there are 4 key skills you’ll need if you’re going to go from vaguely functional introvert to the kind of introvert that throws parties, does #techkaraoke and has a suite at @LuxorLV named after them (okay that last one is on my #bucketlist):

  1. Jumping into a conversation
  2. Buying someone a drink
  3. Striking up a conversation with a girl
  4. Working a room

Jumping Into a Conversation

Let’s be honest, this is the hardest part. It’s like my grandma used to say: the hardest part of swimming is not sinking. Yeah, she was wise, grams was.

So here are the easiest steps:

  1. Find a physical spot: Groups tend to self-distribute (I found a mathematical formula for this, but even I’m not geeky enough to post it, heh), so the vast majority will automatically self-adjust once you stand about a foot beyond the group’s perimeter. Once it does, join the circle. Incidentally, this also works for dancing, but that’s for the advanced and really brave (read: drunk) geek.
  2. Make eye contact: Eye contact is your strongest weapon. It doesn’t require any words, doesn’t require you to do anything except look around the circle, and when someone makes eye contact don’t look away, just give a friendly nod.
  3. Dip your toe in: If you’re a funny person (and someone beside your mom has told you this), a quick quip will get you a laugh, and hence acceptance into the group. If you’re not, wait until you have something meaningful to say. If after 3-4 minutes nothing comes up, ask a question: “Where are you guys from?” “Are y’all here together?” “Wow, did anyone else forget to bring deodorant?” are all acceptable questions to get things going.

Now this assumes that the party isn’t too loud, that the group is fairly static, etc. If not, your task is harder, so you should make a “friend” (ideally someone that laughs at your deodorant jokes) and stick close. It’s less weird than it seems, unless you did (in fact) forget to bring deodorant! As a result, practice this at the convention center before you go to a party: once you’ve successfully gotten in 4-5 groups, you’ll be ready to try this on the big fish in a hostile environment!

Buying Someone a Drinktini

Okay, here’s the dirty little secret: want to talk to someone specific? Buy them a drink. There’s a social contract that they need to stick around to finish it. Note: this also means if someone buys you one, stick around to finish it.

The process for doing this is simple: say hi; then offer to buy them a drink (because yours is empty, you boozer); and then come back, be charming, make intermittent eye contact, entertain them, don’t stare

Note: Just like a first date (see: #nakeddating at http://nakeddating.tumblr.com), it’s impolite to roofie someone during a networking event.

Striking Up a Conversation With a Girl

If there’s one thing I’ve learned by writing a self-deprecating dating blog (http://nakeddating.tumblr.com) it’s that girls are scary and will eat your soul if you let them… or you’d think that’s what they did based on how scared guys can be of them!

If you’re like me, you were a total loser in high school, never felt confident, attractive, etc. It gets better, and what helps it get better is practice! So here’s your practice drill for the first party, if talking to girls is as hard for you as it was for me. You must successfully complete this drill 10 times in order to pass. Failure is not an option. Like yoda said: there is no try, there is only do. Or something. That line always sounded slightly off to me.

  1. Eye contact is good, staring (at any part of her) is bad… #veryverybad
  2. Be nice. Start out conversation with a compliment. “Love your sweater. It has a great style. Where did you get it? My sister’s birthday coming is coming up and I could check it out for her.” Instant nice guy!!! Then you are right into the let’s talk about family convo which is pretty easy. Start with asking if she has brothers or sisters. Don’t mock her cats (any girl wearing a sweater is bound to have cats). If she’s in a group, use the tips above!
  3. Buy her a drink, if necessary, per the above. Don’t assume most will want wine/spritzers/girly drinks. Some will want beer. Only attempt to mock a girly drink (typically contains “tini” in the name, with a fruit sound at the front of it) if you can do it in a cute/cheeky way (ie: if you get a frown, use #4!)
  4. Do not ask her if she plays WoW or Wii Fit (pretty pretty please) though Mario Party is entirely acceptable, as is Rock Band.
  5. It’s okay if the conversation lags a bit to just say, “Gawd! I am such a geek,” it will be endearing and good for a laugh (hers). And if you have said anything totally stupid in the last few minutes this expression is like a ‘get out of jail free card’. But only use it once per girl.
  6. Do not ask if she’s as nervous as you are (unless you can pull that off that confident awkward thing).
  7. Smile! Awkward, cute, cheeky grins are never, evar a bad thing.
  8. Be honest. Girls can smell guy bullshit from miles away. Seriously.

Beyond that? Talk louder, and treat conversation as a tennis match: don’t let the ball drop. And trust me, if this is at a party, running away is harder than it looks. And will end up on YouTube. And not in a good way. #learningfromexperience

Working a Room

If you’re an introvert, the very idea of working a room of 500 people is terrifying. So here’s the deal. Every room is actually a bunch of small groups, with folk flowing in between. So socially, you really only need to master 3 skills: entering/exiting/participating in groups, going with the flow of people throughout the room to get/give booze/go to the can/hurl over the side of the building if you messed up when talking to a girl and knowing when to arrive/leave.

When moving through the room, don’t move through groups: follow the existing flow of people. As you move along, make eye contact, smile, nod. If a group/person notices you, step out of the flow of people and say hi. Otherwise find a group that looks small/big enough for you, and follow the tips above. Rinse, repeat.

Don’t feel you need to “touch” every group. If you nail 10 ish groups, you’ve done well. If you actually have convos with 5 of those groups, even better.

Be Thou Unafraid

Dirty little secret: if you’re a first timer, there are more new people at BWE this year than there are veterans. Social media folk, especially introverts or people around for the first time are like camels: they’re more scared of you than you are of them. So be nice, be friendly and say hi. And if you get lost, ask for help on Twitter. It’s like your own Easy Button (ahem)!

Take it from an introvert: it sucks, it’s scary, but the friendship, relationships, laughter and networking are more than worth the risk!

Image Source

Blogsvertise Returns to BlogWorld!

Author:

Many bloggers opt to monetize their blog. From placing banner links on their homepage to writing paid reviews, plenty of options exist for a blogger eager to earn money. Any of these can be great ways of making money.

For bloggers interested in earning revenue, Blogsvertise is an online service that helps bloggers get paid for writing reviews on their blog. Blogsvertise sends users assignments relevant to their site, and they then have the option of accepting or declining the ad.

We offer a variety of ad types for bloggers to choose from:

  • Paid reviews
  • Text links
  • Banner ads
  • Paid Per Click

We encourage bloggers that choose to write a paid entry to write their honest opinion of the product, service or site. Users also have the option to decline a task for any reason.

When it comes to writing paid posts, bloggers are required to disclose somewhere on their blog that they receive payment for their posts. We understand that it’s very important for readers to know this information.

As far as price goes, bloggers may set their own ad rates. They can choose a minimum payout rate, and they won’t receive any assignments lower than this. However, bloggers do not have to set their own rate if they are not sure what rate to choose. For those that don’t set their own rate, posts typically pay $10-20 on average.

Advertisers are looking for higher traffic blogs. These blogs appeal to our advertisers not only because they know more people will see their ads, but also because they know these blogs tend to have quality posts and grammar.

Bloggers with great content and good grammar can also become part of our blogger VIP Program. Bloggers in our VIP Program have a higher likelihood of receiving more tasks, higher payouts, and better assignments. Typically blogs with a lot of original content become part of our VIP Program. VIP Bloggers post frequently, respond to tasks regularly and often have more than one blog (though this is not required).

If you are interested in the VIP program, or just want to stop by and talk to us in general, please feel free to visit us at the Blog World Expo. You’ll be able to find us at booth number 512, and you can ask for me, Elizabeth. You can also join now using our blogger registration page.

We attended the show in 2007, and we can’t wait to be back! We’re looking forward to talking with bloggers, and we hope to see you there!

Elizabeth Frey is a team member at Blogsvertise and has been blogging for years. She is also an aspiring writer and recently started editing Blogging Hero, where she writes about how to make money blogging and provides other general tips for bloggers.

How a Geek Gets Organized for BlogWorld Expo

Author:

Conferences can be very overwhelming if you are not organized. Having a good plan of action and easy access to your plan at anytime can make your conference experience a good one. I use Evernote to keep track of everything I need for any conference, but any note program that you can access on any of your devices will also work.

From the moment I first hear about a conference until I am done with writing thank you notes after the conference, I put it all in Evernote because I will have access from my iMac, MacBook, PC laptop, iPhone and iPad both online and offline.

Here are 13 examples of what I add for each conference I attend.

  1. Travel Arrangements. Forward copies of my hotel and transportation details including shuttle and/or taxi information.

  2. Conference Schedule. The official schedule put out by the conference and my own schedule of appointments I have set up during the conference.
  3. Speaker’s Session Notes. Many speakers will write detailed blog posts to promote their sessions. These are great to have handy at the conference when deciding which session to attend. I try to decide before I leave, but inevitably, I change my mind.
  4. Speaker Bios. I research the speakers of each session I am interested in attending. I will glance at those notes before I attend the session. When I go up to introduce myself to the speaker(s), I can talk to them about their specific blog or company. It shows that I did my homework.
  5. Brand or Company Bios. I also research the brands and companies that will be at the conference. When I head to the exhibit hall, I am fully prepared.
  6. Tweets. About a month before a conference, I begin to follow the conference’s hashtag in TweetDeck. As tweets come through that I want to remember on site, I email the Tweet to Evernote.
  7. My Session Notes. The notes I take during a session at the conference.
  8. In Person Meeting Notes. This isn’t always possible because often you meet on the run for a moment. But I try to take notes after I meet with someone especially if I promised to do something.
  9. Business Cards. I take a snapshot of the business card right after I receive it. If someone doesn’t have a business card available, I will ask to take a picture of their badge.
  10. Pictures. I upload all my pictures from the conference as a backup and to keep all conference materials in one place.
  11. Session Handouts. I take a picture with my iPhone and keep it with the session notes because Evernote can search for text within pictures.
  12. Maps and/or Directions. If I have parties or meetings to attend away from the main location, I will get a map and directions before I leave.
  13. Receipts. All the receipts I collect during the conference that I will need for my taxes. I take a picture of the receipt as soon as I get it. If I lose it, I have a backup copy.
  14. Bonus: Anything Else. All the other minor details and notes and bits of information that come through before a conference that I may need to know. I create a separate folder for each conference I attend and I tag all the notes with the conference’s hashtag (#bwe10 for BlogWorld Expo 2010). I could print out all this information, but having it available in Evernote, allows me to quickly search for any note. I download the conference file to each device I take with me so all the notes are available offline too.

How are you preparing for BlogWorld Expo?

Michele McGraw is a mom of 4 who blogs about technology, digital scrapbooking and fitness at Scraps of My Geek Life. She can be found socializing on Twitter, @ScrappinMichele.

Image Credit: Microsoft Image Gallery

Discount Pricing Ends Tomorrow! Don’t Miss Your Chance to Save Money & Register Today

Author:

Whether you can only fly in for a day, or you’re here all week, BlogWorld & New Media Expo offers several conference packages to help you maximize your time in Las Vegas. Our discount pricing ends TOMORROW. Learn more about the different packages and Register TODAY!

BlogWorld & New Media Expo 2010 Pricing:

Pass Types
Discount Price
(Purchase Before
midnight PST Sept 16th)
Standard Pricing
(Purchase After
Sept 16th)
Full Access Pass
$895 $1195
Weekend Pass $395 $495
Thursday Only Pass $395 $495

Exhibits Only Pass

$35 $50

Still wondering if you should attend? Check out some of these testimonials from past events:

“The panel I was on was filled with corporate blog rockstar talent from Dell, Facebook, Yahoo!, and LinkedIn. We enjoyed addressing the standing-room only venue and the feedback I got from the audience was that they left with some great new information to help their blogging and social media efforts.”
— Thomas Hoehn/Kodak

“I have been to every BlogWorld since they first started and they keep getting better. The level of expertise in the speakers and panels are at the highest level. Every time I attend the conference, I leave filled with new ideas, tactics and strategies that I take home and implement. The sponsors and exhibitors are phenomenal and extremely relevant to those who blog or engage on the social web.”
— Michael Brito/Edelman

“BlogWorld is seriously one of the best conferences I’ve been to in a long time. THANK YOU.”
— Ben Huh/Cheezburger Network

“BlogWorld is the show I look forward to all year!”
— Lisa Barone/Outspoken Media

Win a Weekend Pass to BlogWorld 2010!

Author:

Thanks to our friends at SXSW for helping put together this amazing chance for you to win a Weekend Pass to BlogWorld 2010!

Here are the details:

Write a song with lyrics that incorporate the event names “SXSW Interactive” and “BlogWorld”, record a video of yourself performing the song, and post it on YouTube. Email SXSW a link to the video by Sept 25, using the subject line “SXSW BlogWorld Song Contest 2010”.

Musical genre is not important, but creativity and showmanship are key. Most importantly, it should tell us in a fun way why you you are excited to attend BlogWorld 2010.

I’d love to showcase your videos here, so leave a link below if you’re entering the contest!

Not Using AdSense? You Could Be Leaving Money on The Table

Author:

Daniel Scocco

BlogWorld 2010 Speaker
New Media Track
Friday October 15, 2010
Islander E/4

Time: 12:15PM to 1:15PM

 
When bloggers and webmasters start monetizing their websites they usually turn to Google AdSense. Why? Because it is one of the easiest ad networks to get accepted into, the implementation is straight forward, and the earnings are decent.

Over time, however, most people drop AdSense in favor of other monetization methods. Some start selling ad space directly to advertisers, others resort to affiliate marketing, others yet launch their own products. Many also use a combination of these three methods.

This is the route I followed too, and while I think it can be the right one, I found that completely removing AdSense from your monetization strategy can be a mistake. Below you’ll find why.

My Story

As most people, I also started monetizing my sites with Google AdSense. I still remember that first month (November 2005 if I am not wrong), when I made a whooping $15! It wasn’t much, but definitely enough to get me excited.

The earnings kept growing month after month, but once my sites reached a critical mass I changed the monetization strategy. I started selling my ads directly, and affiliate marketing became another important income source. As a result I removed Adsense from most of my sites.

Two years passed by.

Then one day one of my sponsors canceled a banner, and I decided to give AdSense one more chance. The eCPM I got was very high, so I figured that I should try to integrate AdSense into my websites again, along with the existing monetization methods.

Long story short after a couple of months and a lot of tweaking around I started making over $3,000 monthly from AdSense, and that was on top of what I was already making with the other income streams (e.g., selling ads directly, affiliate marketing and selling my own products).

That is why I think removing AdSense completely from the equation is a mistake. Even if you are already making a lot of money with other monetization methods you could still use AdSense as a complementary source.

My Blog World 2010 Presetantion

Obviously you need to know how to optimize Adsense if you want to make decent money with it. Simply dropping units here and there won’t work.

That is what my Blog World 2010 presentation is about. I’ll share the tips and tricks I learned optimizing AdSense on my websites over the years. The presentation will take place Friday, October 15, at 12:15pm.

If you want a quick tip to get started, here we go: Focus on the big AdSense units. Google itself confirmed a while ago that the top performing units are the 336×280 large rectangle, the 300×250 medium rectangle and the 160×600 wide skyscraper. If you want to make decent money with AdSense, you need to be able to use one of more of these units in your website.

I’ll see you in Vegas.

Daniel Scocco started developing blogs and websites in 2005. He is owner of DailyBlogTips.com , which is currently ranked among the top 500 blogs in the world according to Technorati, and among the top 100 marketing blogs in the world according to AdAge.

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