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Pinspiration Saturday: Representing Your Brand with Scott Stratten

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We’re back for another Pinspiration Saturday, our weekly series where we highlight a quote from one of our amazing speakers every week. If that quote resonates with you, we hope you’ll take a minute to share the “pinspiration” with your followers on Pinterest by pinning it! And as always, you can also share via Facebook, Google+, Twitter, or any of your favorite social networks.

Your brand is what you do after two drinks

There is a now-infamous picture of Scott Stratten pole-dancing in Las Vegas. It was during an event after-party to celebrate his latest book, and after a few drinks, he hopped on stage for some silliness. Luckily, being a little silly fits in well with Scott’s personal brand, because in about a millisecond, everyone at the party had pulled out a camera phone to take pictures. Those pictures were on the Internet before Scott even got off stage.

Now imaging if Scott worked for a brand like Disney. Pictures of him on a stripper pole at a company after-party wouldn’t be funny anymore. It would be face-palm-inducing.

In this episode of TheVegas30 Podcast (embedded above or click to watch), Scott talks about how important it is to realize that you’re always representing your employer. Says Scott, “Your brand is what you do after two drinks.” And he’s right. If you can’t control yourself and act professionally at conferences and other work-sponsored events, don’t have that second drink.

That’s not to say you can’t have fun! At NMX, we have a ton of fun, and there’s always plenty of alcohol to go around at our networking parties. If you’re there to make connections and grow your business, though, keep in mind that a first impression is lasting. Have a good time, but make sure you keep your professional goals in mind when you’re tempted to do shots at the bar or jump on stage to dance.

Scott also give a shout-out to NMX CEO Rick Calvert and talks about what it takes to put together a conference, in this episode, so this is definitely a podcast you don’t want to miss. Check it out, and don’t forget to follow Scott on Twitter at @unmarketing and give a listen to his other podcast, the UnPodcast. He’s going to be keynoting in January, so if you don’t have your ticket to NMX yet, get it now!

Three Ways to Brand Yourself as an Authority Blogger

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authority blogger The end goal for all bloggers is to create a blog that becomes an authority site and might even make you an authority figure in the process. Being an “authority” means you are the “go to” source for information. The good news is that you can be an authority in any given niche.

In the world of blogging and internet marketing you might consider well known names like John Chow, Darren Rowse, Jeremy Schoemaker, and Brian Clark  as authority figures. In the travel niche, you probably know the names Gary Arndt and Dave and Deb from The Planet D. Food bloggers know Ree Drummond. Fashion bloggers know Leandra Medine. These individuals were able to their skills and knowledge, start a blog and share it with the world. Once people find true value in your content and start commenting and sharing it with others, then the magic happens.

Becoming an authority figure or creating an authority site isn’t really something that can be done with money (unless you want to spend a ton), in the end it comes down to the quality of content on your site, how you interact with your audience and continue to grow over time.

Everyone can become an authority, it’s just a matter of putting in the time and effort. Here’s five ways you can brand yourself as an authority blogger.

Start By Creating Really Killer Content

The first step to creating an authority blog starts with your content. It’s so easy to create a blog and start throwing content out there, but it’s extremely hard to stand out from the crowd and be known for awesome content. This is where you really need to put the time and focus in before you even get started.

Here’s what you need to ask yourself.

  • Why am I creating this blog in the first place?
  • Who is going to be my target audience and why are they coming to the blog?
  • What can I give my audience that other blogs in my niche aren’t?

Ask and answer these simple questions and you will start off on the right path for success.

Blast Your Name and Face Everywhere

I’m not talking about hiring some $5 SEO service on Fiverr and blasting your content and links all over the place! I’m talking about legitimately getting your name out there and getting heard. This is exactly what I have done over the years to make ZacJohnson.com and authority site and recognized name in the affiliate marketing and blogging space. As Pat Flynn says… “Be Everywhere“.

  • Guest blog on relevant and high end sites in your niche
  • Speak at various conferences
  • Make friends with top names in the industry
  • Help everyone and answer all of your emails

Get Social – It’s All About Engagement

I have to say that over the years I’ve always been lacking in the social media department, but it’s something I’ve been getting better at and more active lately. To make your blog really stand out and build an authority around your name or business, you really need to have a great social following as well. This will allow you to connect with so many more people and allow you to be accessible and more personal to your readers. Having a social connection on all networks will also allow you to grow your follow through many different outlets and deliver your blog updates instantly to their news feeds.

Here’s a few more social updates for you to use.

  • Make sure you are definitely on Google+, Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn
  • Create a Facebook Fan Page for your brand/blog in addition to having a personal profile there
  • Sign up for and monitor Klout, which is a great way to bring all of your social network links together
  • Respond, comment and engage with other social users
  • Use the same picture for all of your social accounts to increase your branding

And there you have it… three simple yet extremely effective ways for you to start growing your blogging brand and eventually become an authority figure within your niche!

Want to learn more about becoming an authority in your niche? Learn from people who are authorities in their respected niches by attending NMX in Las Vegas this January!

Image credit (altered): Bigstock

Are You Targeting the Wrong Social Influencers? 3 Mistakes Brands are Making

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Working with major influencers might be able to help your brand reach new audiences, but are you reaching out to the wrong people online? How you measure the value of an influencer can drastically affect the success of your campaigns. Let’s take a look at three mistakes brands are making when it comes to working with social influencers.

Mistake #1: Working with Influencers Long-Term without Monitoring

Most companies monitor the the ROI of working with individuals or groups of influencers, but this isn’t the only thing you should be monitoring. In a post for Social Media Examiner, Russ Henneberry from Content Measures notes that one of the most important things for you to follow is what else a person is saying online. Why? You might not want to endorse what they are doing.

Remember, when you’re working with an influencer to promote your brand, they are a low-level spokesperson for your company. Someone who has a large, engaged network isn’t always a good choice if they are also saying things that aren’t in line with your brand’s mission statement. For example, someone who curses or talks about adult topics often might not be great for promoting a family brand, even if they are followed by a lot of parents.

Mistake #2: Working with Influencers who Promote Anything for a Buck

We all need to make a living, but if you’re working with social influencers who are willing to promote nearly anything, you might be missing the mark a bit. Someone promoting several things throughout the day is doing little more than broadcasting. Even if they have a large, engaged audience, few people will read the message about your company simply because the stream is moving too fast.

Instead, look for influencers who are a little more selective about what they promote. These influencers, because they work with a smaller number of brands, are more useful to you, since their audience doesn’t have as much content fatigue as influencers who are constantly promoting something or other.

Mistake #3: Neglecting Social Influencers who Already Like Your Brand

Before you start making a list of social influencers with high Klout scores or large Twitter followings, look at who is already talking about your brand or at least using your product. It’s important to reward influencers who are already loyal to your brand before you go outside of your community to find more influencers willing to talk about your brand.

Keep your community, especially the top influencers, engaged, offer sneak previews, coupons, and other offers. Retweet your fans and republish their content (with permission). Above all, listen. Don’t just respond to complaints. Show your appreciation for positive comments as well.

Ramon Ray’s Five Steps for Personal Branding

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As many of you may have heard, NMX (BlogWorld) recently purchased a new conference: Ramon Ray’s Small Business Summit. We’re super excited to work with Ramon, who is an absolute firecracker.

Ramon was actually a speaker at NMX 2013, where he talked about personal branding and how this affects your company’s growth. Knowing Ramon on a personal level, not just seeing a faceless Small Business Summit logo, is part of what enticed NMX to want to work with him in the first place, so he was the perfect person to speak on this topic.

His session covered an incredible amount of information in just a short 30 minutes (and you can watch the entire session as a premium member of NMX University), but today, I wanted to cover his five steps for personal branding success. (And a big thank you to Jess Boyer for helping with this post by taking notes during the session!)

Step One: Establish Your Platform

People like to put other people and businesses into neat, little boxes. If you don’t define yourself, others will do it for you. So think about what your message will be, what your brand will be. What are your strengths? What do you want people to know about you? What makes you stand out?

Step Two: Show the Hell Up!

According to Ramon, you don’t have to tweet all day long. What you do have to do, however, is be visible online and in your community. Volunteer. Join your local chamber or business networks. Look for new opportunities for people to get to know you. You can’t phone in the personal connection factor.

Step Three: Be an Online Publisher

Ramon also stated something we know extremely well here at NMX: if you aren’t online, you don’t exist. You have to lead with your content online, rather than the sell. Get out there on social media and start a blog so you can tell your story. People will listen, and once they get to know, like, and trust you, they’ll also want to do business with you.

Step Four: Plan for Media Exposure

Once you establish yourself online and in your community, the media will start to contact you, and this has a snowball effect. Media leads to more media leads to more media – provided you are an interesting story to cover. So be ready. Be personable and have your story ready to tell in a quick easy-to-understand way.

Step Five: Organize an Event

This is by far the hardest step in Ramon’s plan, but it can also be the most rewarding. You don’t have to plan the next NMX or Small Business Summit. Even on a small level, events will help you network with others in your industry, attract media attention, and boost your credibility. However, it’s important to be aware that organizing an event can be stressful and expensive. If you work with people you trust, though, it can be an incredible personal branding tool.

Remember, you can watch Ramon’s complete session, along with dozens of others about business, online content creation, publishing, social media, and more at NMX University with premium membership (our 2013 virtual ticket). Check it out today!

Free Gift: Go-To-Market Planning Session with Stephanie Piche

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A free gift from NMX Speaker Stephanie Piche: Go-To-Market Planning Sessions

Here at NMX, planning for our January event is in full swing…but that doesn’t mean we don’t have time for the holidays! That’s why, every day from now through December 25, we’re featuring a brand new giveaway for the entire NMX community!

Are you hoping to start using social media to expand your brand?
Do you need some help analyzing your presence online to define areas of improvement?Today’s free giveaway is for you! Stephanie Piche has over 20 years experience in new media, producing, publishing and technology marketing as well as a deep experience in social media for content creators and publishers.

She’s offering free consulting to help you plan your next move!

Like all of our 12 Days of Giveaways gifts, a planning session with Stephanie’s company, Key Practices, Inc. is completely free for members of our brand new community, NMX University. (Don’t worry – membership there is also free!)

Find out more about this gift and register for NMXU here, of if you are already a member, simply log in to NMXU here to access Stephanie’s consultation today!

Free Gift: Chris Ducker’s New Branding Bootcamp! [12 Days of Giveaways]

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A free gift from NMX Speaker Chris Ducker: How to Build Your Online Brand

Here at NMX, planning for our January event is in full swing…but that doesn’t mean we don’t have time for the holidays! That’s why, every day from now through December 25, we’re featuring a brand new giveaway for the entire NMX community!

Chris Ducker is an entrepreneur who has built a very successful personal brand online. How can you stand out online among all the noise? Here’s what his screencast will cover:

  • New Rules of Personal Branding: How you can take your marketing efforts online.
  • Importance of Blogging: Find out how Chris grew a huge following for his business with a blog.
  • Embracing New Media: Don’t be afraid of emerging branding tools like podcasts and video.
  • Selling Your Expertise: This bonus section covers how to make money once you’ve built a personal brand.

Like all of our 12 Days of Giveaways gifts, Chris’ 45-minute presentation is completely free for members of our brand new community, NMX University. (Don’t worry – membership there is also free!) He’s giving away both video and audio versions, so don’t miss out!

You can find out more about this presentation and register for NMXU here, of if you are already a member, simply log in to NMXU here to download your free copy today!

Telling Your Brand’s Story: Historic Lessons and Modern Applications

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In May 1942, Nazis ordered a group of German filmmakers to go into what is today one of the most iconic areas of the time period: the Warsaw Ghetto. Here, over 400,000 Jews were kept as Nazi prisoners in conditions that most of us couldn’t dream of surviving. Rations without enough calories to survive, deplorable living conditions where disease ran rampant, and police brutality were some of the daily struggles for Warsaw Jews living in the Ghetto.

And yet, the Reich sent in a film crew. Writes Huffington Post’s Richard Z. Chesnoff, “Their perverse propaganda goal: to record for posterity examples of the religious practices and “sub-human culture” of the soon to be eliminated judische Rasse, everything from a circumcision ceremony to a burial service; from the extreme poverty of the many to the supposed lack of concern of those few Jews who still had some assets.”

The Nazi brand, when simplified, was “Jews and others who don’t fit our mold are bad people.” And they knew that the most powerful way to spread this message was not in telling this message to others outright, but rather showing it in story form.

The wall of victims at Yad Vasham, identified using both Nazi and personal records

The film was ultimately never finished because the footage didn’t tell the story the Nazi party wanted it to tell. But on my recent trip to Yad Vasham, the World Center for Holocaust Research, Education, Documentation, and Commemoration, I was taken aback by this idea of storytelling during the 1940s. It was something even the Nazi party, perhaps the kings of propaganda, pegged as extremely important. Brands can still learn from this lesson today.

The Value of Information

Recording and sharing information are perhaps more important to your brand than you realize. It’s in these activities that your story has a beginning, a base for your entire brand. Leaders of the Nazi party certainly put their own heavy spin on the information that was shared with the public, but they nonetheless realized the importance of precise records to the story they wanted to tell.

“For the Germans, proper record keeping was part of proper management. Hence, careful records and organized paperwork were maintained of all Nazi activities, even when these were criminal and murderous. The only blatant exception to this record-keeping was the “Final Solution to the Jewish Question,” a top secret operation for which there was no official budget and whose records were camouflaged within other records or in special language. It was only in the very last stages of the war, when defeat was at the door, that various officials (e.g., Adolf Eichmann) and offices destroyed some of the incriminating records,” says one historian at Yad Vasham.

Lest you’re wary of learning a lesson from the Nazi party, fear not: protecting information as a way to shape ideas and culture goes back much farther than the rise of the Third Reich. In “Archives, Records, and Power: The Making for Modern Memory,” authors Joan M. Schwartz and Terry Cook write, “Archives are social constructs. Their origins lie in the information needs and social values of the rulers, governments, businesses, associations, and individuals who establish and maintain them. Despite changes in the nature of records, the uses for those records, and the need to preserve them, archives, ever since the mnemons of ancient Greece, have been about power – about maintaining power, about the power of the present to control what is, and will be, known about the past, about the power of remembering over forgetting.”

The value in proper information, then, is power.

It’s easy to see how this translates into power for a brand. With the rise of social media, now more than ever before, it’s important for every employee, from CEO to night janitor, to understand the brand’s story. Every employee is a potential brand advocate through Facebook. Every employee is a potential customer service rep through Twitter. If information isn’t readily available to every employee, your company runs the risk of employees spreading incorrect information or muddling your messaging.

What systems do you have in place to share information within your company?

From Brand Information to Messaging

Every brand’s story starts with facts: when the company was founded, why the founders saw a need for a product or service, how the business operates today. But presenting the facts to your audience isn’t the same thing as telling a story. That’s what the Nazi party understood and why they sent filmmakers to Warsaw. And ultimately, it’s why the Warsaw Ghetto movie never got made. What the Nazi party realized is that they couldn’t turn the information about their atrocities into a positive message about their party no matter how hard they tried.

You can’t turn bad information into a good story–and your shouldn’t try. Doing so is no better than a propagandized message or, as we like to call it today, “spin.” If you have to spin your information to tell your brand’s story, it’s perhaps time to rethink your company policies and the way you do business.

You can tell a good story without being dishonest. It’s all about presenting information in an interesting way, not about exaggerating or falsifying information. There are certain “storylines” that resonate with customers you can use to tell your brand’s story. I also recommend checking out this extremely detailed lesson on the elements of story structure for businesses. At the root of business storytelling, however, is this: be honest and personable. People spend money when they know, like, and trust you and your company.

Some companies do this extremely well. Take Ford Motor Company, for example, who combine online advertising with storytelling to make new product promotion more entertaining and personal. Another great example is Canon, who’s Project Imaginat10n is telling a new story of inspiration, creativity, and product simplicity for their brand.

The Storytelling Timeline

Your brand’s story isn’t just a one-time tale with a defined end. As your business continues to grow, your story will expand. Thus, you need to update the information you share with your employees and edit your story to provide updates. Over time, your message may evolve, and that’s okay. What’s important is that you keep records well so that you’re always a credible source and continue to share your story in a way that is easily understood by your audience.

Making Your Online Audience Uncomfortable in 10 Simple Steps

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Almost all businesses can benefit from an Internet presence, but if your online efforts aren’t properly managed, you could end up with a very uncomfortable audience. I’m all for stirring the pot when the moment is right, but if you aren’t careful, this discomfort will drive away business. Uncomfortable, awkward moments rarely lead to sales.

“Business schmisness!” you say? Alright then; here’s how to make your audience uncomfortable in 10 simple steps.

1. Get political.

The easiest and fastest way to drive away your online audience is to be extremely opinionated about a topic that doesn’t have anything to do with your company, but is extremely dividing. What better option than politics? So go ahead and tell us how stupid you think Democrats are! Or let us know that you think Republicans are morons! Encourage your audience to vote for your candidate of choice. After all, if they disagree, you don’t want their business anyway, right?

2. Get religious.

Politics aren’t your cup of tea? No problem! Just get religious. Nothing will make your audience uncomfortable faster than if you start challenging their belief system while they’re trying to buy your product.

3. Get defensive when you’re wrong.

If you don’t like politics or religion, don’t worry. There are still plenty of ways to make your audience uncomfortable. Your online outlets will have to deal with customer problems from time to time, for example. Instead of apologizing and addressing the issue, get really defensive. Start an argument with one of your customers, and remember: never back down.

4. Beg for money.

Your audience won’t be truly uncomfortable until you’re begging for money. Tell them about your financial problems. Plead for more sales. If you really want to take the discomfort to the next level, you can even consider adding a donate button to your website. It’s not enough for people to support you by buying your products. They should just give you money as well.

5. Start an argument with another brand.

Your competitors really suck. Who cares if your audience is uncomfortable; you should tell them in a very public way so everyone knows how much better your company is.

6. Ignore a problem.

So what if your customers have problems? So what if your product’s been recalled? So what if your entire audience is ranting about issues online? It’s not like your store is on fire or something. Just ignore the problems and they’ll probably go away.

7. Mix personal with professional.

It’s going to make everyone extremely uncomfortable when you post your pictures from vacation on your company Twitter account, especially since you spent most of your time at a nude beach. Make sure to boost the discomfort level by going into detail about how your kid is potty training, and take every opportunity to complain about life. There’s no need for separation between personal and professional when you don’t care about audience comfort.

8. Be R-Rated.

Some of your customers prefer mild language? Kids might use your website? Eff that. It’s your business. You should be as vulgar as you want. Bonus points if you’re vaguely inappropriate with one of your customers.

9. Opt for text-speak instead of using grammar.

You only have 140 characters on Twitter, so you better make every one of them count. No need to shorten your message and use proper grammar (or at least make it readable). Speak like a 14-year-old girl would text. They’ll figure it out.

10. Give out incorrect information.

If your audience isn’t already clicking away from your site or profiles online, start doling out incorrect information. There’s no need to fact check. Go ahead and contradict yourself. If anyone asks a question to clarify, just ignore it (see point #6). That way, you can not only make your audience uncomfortable, but you can also really tick them off.

Photo Credit: Bigstock

Guest Posting isn’t Dead (…Yet)

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Early this month, I was having a conversation about guest posting with a friend of mine. This is a topic I have personally been examining over the last year, so when he asserted that “guest posting is dead,” I had to voice my opposition.

I do, however, think that guest posting expectations bloggers have are sometimes a bit out of whack. Guest posting isn’t dead any more than blogging itself is dead, but the way some bloggers go about guest posting is certainly putting it on life support.

(If you’re new to guest posting, you might want to check out our five-part series on guest posting, which will help you write better posts and place these posts on great blogs, as well as our beginner’s guide to guest posting.)

Guest Posting the Wrong Way

Guest posting started as a simple theory: if you write a free post for another blogger and his/her readers like it, they’ll come back to your blog via the link at the end of your post and become a member of your community as well.

I can tell you from tons of personal experience that this doesn’t usually happen, at least, not at a rate that makes your hard work worthwhile.

Even if you write a guest post for a well-known, popular blogger, that traffic isn’t going to translate. Readers are fans of certain blogs because they like that specific blogger. You’re someone new, unknown, not to be trusted. A small percentage of people who read your post – even if they like it – will actually click the link in your bio, and an even smaller percentage will actually become long-term readers on your blog.

If you go into guest posting with the expectation that you’re going to get tons of traffic and new readers to your own blog, you’re likely going to be sorely disappointed.

Guest Posting = Branding, Not Immediate Traffic

I still recommend guest posting, however, because if you do it properly, you can end up with tons of new readers. It’s about being strategic.

Guest posting is about branding. You want your name to suddenly start popping up everywhere so people start to recognize it. If you write a one-time guest post on another site, you might get a few curious readers coming to your own blog, but if the same readers start to see your name everywhere, they’re going to start to wonder who you are, and if they like your content, they’re going to end up on your blog sooner or later.

So, think about guest posts in terms of groups of posts going out over the course of a week, not just single posts here or there. Immediate traffic shouldn’t be the goal; you’ll see traffic over time as name recognition builds.

Guest Posting for SEO

Guest posts are also great for SEO purposes. You do have to be careful about putting too much stock into a single type of link-building, since Google is constantly changing, but having your link without a post on a popular blog can help your search engine standings. Even better than linking back to your homepage in the bio is to link to specific posts relevant about the topic within the guest post you write. Don’t overdo it or your host will likely turn down the post, but definitely link to posts on your blog when relevant and helpful to the reader.

Relationship Building with Guest Posts

My favorite reason to guest post is to build relationships with other bloggers. If you offer a well-written, interesting guest post for another blogger, you’re giving them free content that they can’t get anywhere else. It’s a great way to get on someone’s radar. Often, I’ve guest posted for someone and they’ve gone on to become a long-term reader of my blog, even though they had previously never heard of me (or just knew me as one of the bajillon commenters on their site). Relationships with other bloggers in your niche are invaluable.

Managing Expectations

At the end of the day, guest posting is simply about managing your expectations. If you are looking for massive traffic numbers, especially right away, this is not an technique worth your time. If you’re taking a more “slow and steady wins the race” approach to blogging and interested in benefits other than traffic, guest posting is definitely a great blog-building technique to add to your promotional activities.

Interested in getting the most out of a guest post – or really any post you write on any blog? Jon Morrow is coming to NMX Las Vegas this January to present a session on the Anatomy of a 100,000 Visitor Post. You don’t want to miss this one!

What Hooters Can Teach You About Online Content

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No matter where you live in the world, you probably aren’t far from a Hooters. Known for it’s wings, beer, and girls in skimpy outfits, this restaurant is far from perfect, but Hooters does have a few things to teach us about creating online content. The next time you’re creating a blog post, podcast, video, or other online content, here are a few things to keep in mind:

1. Packaging matters.

Whether you like it or not, part of the Hooters brand is pretty girls in tight clothing. That’s why some people choose to frequent this restaurant. What Hooters realizes is that how you package your content (in this case, food) matters. Now, I’m not saying you have to post pictures of yourself in a low cut shirt or something to be successful online, but what you do need to do is consider how you’re presenting your content. If your site isn’t well-designed and your content isn’t formatted well, readers will get frustrated.

Keep in mind that what works well today in terms of design might not work well forever. Don’t be afraid to redesign your website as needed to better serve your readers. Don’t allow your content to get lost just because your site is poorly designed.

2. The wings and beer are just as important as the girls.

When I say “Hooters,” the first thing you probably think of is the waitresses. However, no matter how pretty the girls may be, if the food was consistently bad, people wouldn’t go back. Hooters has fans because they actually do have pretty good wings (I can confirm this; I’ve eaten at Hooters and the wings were great). So, while your design and formatting to matter, if the content isn’t awesome, readers won’t keep coming back for more.

3. Controversy is okay.

Hooters is definitely a controversial restaurant. I know lots of people who won’t eat there because they feel like it is demeaning to women – and that’s okay. But what this company has realized is that for every person who hates them, there’s another person who loves them. If they weren’t controversial, they’d be just another chain restaurant getting lost in the shuffle. A little controversy is okay with your content as well. If you’re dumbing down your message to appease everyone, you’re probably writing such generic content that it isn’t interesting to anyone. It’s okay to start debates and voice strong opinions, because while you may lose some readers, the fans that stay will love you even more.

4. Make your brand recognizable.

No matter where you go in the world, Hooters is Hooters. It’s the brown owl with bright orange eyes and the “delightfully tacky, yet unrefined” t-shirts promoting whatever location you’ve visited. Part of good branding practices is ensuring that your fans can recognize you no matter where you go, and that extends to online content as well. Be consistent, using the same name, pictures, etc. on your social media accounts as you use on your home website. Just like Hooters, you want fans of your content to be able to find you and connect with you as much as possible!

Picture source: Beao via Wikimedia Commons.

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