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25 Brilliant Bloggers Talk About Facebook Ads

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Brilliant Bloggers is a bi-weekly series here at NMX where we look at the best posts from around the web all surrounding a specific topic. Every other week, we’ll feature a brilliant blogger, along with a huge list of more resources where you can learn about the topic. You can see more Brilliant Blogger posts or learn how to submit your link for an upcoming edition here.

This Week’s Topic: Facebooks Ads

Facebook ads is a way to “buy fans/likes” in a very targeted way. You can advertise on the Facebook sidebar, or you can promote one of your updates so more people see it. Either way, Facebook ads are a great way to build your brand if you have a little money in the budget. I wrote about my Facebook ad buying experiences here.

At NMX 2013, Amy Porterfield presented the session “How to Get Started with Facebook Ads: 3 Easy Ad Strategies to Attract Quality Traffic, Grow Your Leads & Increase Profits.” Today, I wanted to dig even deeper into this topic to see what others are saying about buying Facebook ads. If you’re interested in purchasing ads for your content or business, take a gander at their advice first.

Brilliant Blogger of the Week

jennifer beese Every Type of Facebook Advertising and How to Use Them by Jennifer Beese

If you’re a newbie in the world of Facebook advertising, this post from Jennifer at Sprout Insights is the place to start. In the post, she goes over the six main types of ads you can consider buying on Facebook and whether or not each option is the best one for your needs. When you’re new to Facebook ads, the terminology can mix you up a bit, but Jennifer included pictures of each type of ad so you know exactly what she’s talking about.

Check out the full post, and be sure to check out her personal blog and follow Jennifer on Twitter at @bottlethecrazy.

Even More Brilliant Advice:

  1. 3 Tips to Make Your Facebook Ads Stand Out From the Herd by Noran El-Shinnawy (@noranshinnawy)
  2. 5 Facebook Ad Tips to Maximize Your Facebook Campaigns by Andrea Vahl (@andreavahl)
  3. 5 Tips for Facebook Advertising by Gillian Singletary
  4. 6 Tips You Never Know about Facebook Ads by Sam Scholfield (@StuffedWeb)
  5. 7 Tips for Better Facebook Ad Performance [Report] by Miranda Miller (@MirandaM_EComm)
  6. 7 Tips to Create Facebook Ads That Convert by Amy Porterfield (@amyporterfield)
  7. 8 Tips for Effective Facebook Advertising by Jennifer Fong (@jenfongspeaks)
  8. 9 Tips for Choosing An Effective Facebook Ad Image by Chelsea (@shortstacklab)
  9. 10 Facebook Advertising Tips For Brilliant Marketers by Nick O’Neill
  10. 10 Quick Steps to Creating a Facebook Ad Campaign by Jonathan Blum and Alex Dalenberg
  11. 11 Tips for a Better Facebook Ad Campaign by Shaad Hamid (@shaadhamid)
  12. 15 Tips For A Successful Facebook Ads Program by Adam Riff (@MediaWhizInc)
  13. A Deep Dive into Facebooks Advertising by Fred Perrotta (@FredPerrotta)
  14. Facebook Ads Conversion Tracking: How to Create an Offsite Pixel by Jon Loomer (@jonloomer)
  15. Facebook Ads: How to Get 1 Cent CPC (and why you might not want to) by Moment Garden
  16. Facebook Ads, You’re Holding It Wrong by Jason Keath (@JasonKeath)
  17. Facebook Advertising for Dummies Cheat Sheet by Paul Dunay, Richard Krueger, and Joel Elad
  18. How I Optimize Facebook Ad Campaigns In 15 Minutes Per Day by Dennis Yu (@dennisyu)
  19. How To Cheat Your Way To Eyecatching Facebook Ads by Stephen Croome (@firstconversion)
  20. How to Use Facebook Ads: An Introduction by Ben Pickering (@bpicks)
  21. Six Things Nonprofits Should Know About Facebook Ads by Taryn Degnan (@tarynidana)
  22. Three Expert Tips for Better Facebook Advertising by Rich Brooks (@therichbrooks)
  23. Want to create better Facebook ads? Start here by Brad McCarty (@bradmccarty)
  24. Why Facebook Ads are Undervalued & How Advertisers Can Take Advantage by Will Lin (@PPCAssociates)

Did I miss your post or a post by someone you know about Facebook ads? Unintentional! Help me out by leaving a comment below with the link.

Next Brilliant Blogger Topic: Keyword Research

I’d love to include a link to your post in our next installment– and if you head to the Brilliant Bloggers Schedule, you can see even more upcoming posts. We all have something to learn from one another, so please don’t be shy! Head to the schedule today to learn how to submit your post so I won’t miss it.

3 Ways Google Remarketing Increases Sales and Online Interaction

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Every website exists for the purpose of being seen. Whether you are a small business offering products or services, or a blogger looking to gain readers and wider web influence; you want prospective clients to see what you have to offer. However, achieving those site visits is only half the battle.

What you really want is interaction:

– Visitors making a purchase or hiring you for your services
– Readers linking to your blog
– Fellow bloggers talking about your blog through comments and re-posts
– Expansion of social media influence on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.

Google Remarketing is the way to take your site to the next level! It gives you the opportunity to increase interaction, not just traffic.

What is Google Remarketing?

Google Remarketing is an online follow-up tool that allows you to continue to present your ads to prospects, even after they leave your website. You see, not every person who visits your site is ready to jump in. It takes constant exposure to your offers to influence your prospects to make some kind of interaction on your site, be it sales or a blog interaction. Google Remarketing gives you the ability to put tailor-made ads in front of your prospects wherever they go on Google’s extensive Display Network.

Here are 3 ways to use Google Remarketing to increase sales and online interaction:

1. Create More Action with Targeted Ads

With Google Remarketing, you choose what you want your visitors to do. Maybe you want them to buy a certain product, hire a particular service, or make a connection through social media. Google Remarketing gives you a programming code that can tell whether or not your visitor has taken that action step. If they leave your site without taking action, Google will know and that’s when Remarketing begins. After leaving your site, your prospect will be shown custom designed ads promoting your desired action step on every website they visit within the Google Display Network. This is an invaluable tool! Remarketing offers automatic follow-up for your website until your prospect takes the action step you want.

You control:

  • Desired action step (attending your webinar, purchasing an e-book, “Liking” your Facebook page, following your Blog or Twitter account, etc.)
  • Desired demographic. Remarketing allows you to create specific ads for certain target groups. In other words, you can show different ads to a stay-at-home mother versus a young entrepreneur.
  • Site-relevant ads for your products or services. For example, if you offer a landscaping service, an ad specific to that service will appear when prospects visit a relevant site (ie. HGTV.com).

2. Reach a Larger Audience

Google claims on their site that Google Remarketing “reaches 83% of unique Internet users around the world,” so the Google Display Network is an invaluable asset for those looking to achieve maximum exposure for their products, services or content. Every time your prospect visits one of these thousands of sites, they will see your customized ad specifically targeting them. Additionally, because the network is so large and includes so many big-name websites, you gain more than just exposure. You also gain the impression of “being everywhere” and being associated with big-name brands.

Sites within the Google Display Network include:

3. Get the Most Bang for Your Marketing Buck

The best part about Google Remarketing is it can actually get you a lot of free exposure. Google tracks your prospects, promotes your site, and compels those prospects to take the action steps you want them to take, and you don’t pay anything for this promotion unless your prospect clicks on the ad. This means that if your prospect doesn’t click on the advertisement directly, you are still exposing them to your brand and building the credibility of your site. This will make any future advertisements all the more effective. Building your brand and establishing credibility is paramount to turning site visits into interactions. Google Remarketing offers this service to your site with absolutely no risk.

Are you ready to begin building your brand and extending your web influence?

Google Remarketing is an incredible tool that turns website visits into site interactions. More sales. More readers and followers. More clients. You can also improve your local search rankings.

What do you think of Google Remarketing? Please enter your comments below!

28 Brilliant Bloggers Talk About Adwords

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Brilliant Bloggers is a bi-weekly series here at NMX where we look at the best posts from around the web all surrounding a specific topic. Every other week, we’ll feature a brilliant blogger, along with a huge list of more resources where you can learn about the topic. You can see more Brilliant Blogger posts or learn how to submit your link for an upcoming edition here.

This Week’s Topic: Adwords

Adwords from Google is a great solution if you want to drive more traffic to your business website or online content, since you can get started so easily. However, it’s easy to waste money on Adwords if you aren’t optimizing your campaigns. This week’s Brilliant Bloggers is all about doing just that – making the most of Google Adwords to help you reach as many new readers, viewers, or customers as possible.

Brilliant Blogger of the Week

A Simple Guide for Setting Up Your First Google AdWords Campaign by Amanda Sibley

I’m a big fan of Hubspot, and this post from Amanda Sibley is top-notch, just like everything else they publish. If you’re just getting started with Google Adwords, this is a great place to start, since Amanda reviews the process step by step. If you’ve used Adwords before though, there are still some valuable tricks and tips in there that you might not already know.

If you aren’t currently using Google Adwords, why not? Writes Amanda:

If it’s because you’re intimidated by Google’s AdWords interface, we get it. There’s a lot of options that make for better targeted campaigns — but also lead to a lot of confusion among marketers new to the paid search game. But fear no more! After reading this post, you’ll be able to execute your own paid search campaign at the drop of a hat.

After you check out Amanda’s post and the rest of the Hubspot blog, you can also follow her on Twitter at @AmandaSibley1.

Even More Brilliant Advice:

  1. 4 AdWords Optimization Tips to Try This Week by Lisa Raehsler (@LisaRocksSEM)
  2. 5 AdWords Tips from PPC Masters by Elisa Gabbert (@egabbert)
  3. 5 Killer AdWords Tips for Converting Clicks by Aaron Charlie (@aaroncharlie)
  4. 5 Top Adwords Tips by Justin Bruce (@justinbruce1969)
  5. 6 AdWords Tips for Small Business Owners by Zach Thompson (@RYPMarketing)
  6. 6 AdWords Tips from Brad Geddes’ Advanced Training by Bethany Bey (@Bethany_Bey)
  7. 7 Ways to Improve Your Google AdWords Click-Through-Rate by Angela Stringfellow (@CODAConcepts)
  8. 10 Quick Adwords Optimizations Tips for All PPC-ers by Sarah Peduzzi (@sduzy496)
  9. 10 Reasons Why You Should Be Using Google AdWords by Nahid Saleem (@antsmagazine)
  10. 25 Ways to Use AdWords Data for SEO by Tom Demers (@TomDemers)
  11. AdWords Tips & Tricks: Advanced Account Structure by Eric Wortman (@Eric_A2)
  12. Getting More Quality Clicks from Google Adwords by Chris Soames (@csoames)
  13. Getting Started with Google Adwords Tips by Brenden Prazner
  14. Google AdWords Guide for Small Businesses by Hannah Smith
  15. How to Improve Google Adwords Quality Scores [Infographic] by Digital Net Agency (@digitalnetagenc)
  16. How To Use AdWords For Video by GoAnimate (@GoAnimate)
  17. How to use the Google Adwords Keyword Tool by Ryan Kettler (@boostsuite)
  18. Maximizing Your Google AdWords Using Ad Extensions by Cathy Nguyen (@eqmarketing)
  19. SEM Google Adwords Tips by Matt Ganzak (@MattGanzak)
  20. Three Basic Google Adwords Tips for Beginners! by Alok Vats (@vatsalok)
  21. Top 7 AdWords Tips and Tricks For Beginners by Josh Muskin
  22. Top 15 Tips for Managing a Google AdWords Account by Jack Martin (@jackthemartin)
  23. Top 20+ AdWords Tips by Jordan McClements (@PPCNI)
  24. Using AdWords Data for SEO: Unlocking the Ultimate Keyword Research Treasure Trove (Arrrgh!!) by Larry Kim (@larrykim)
  25. Using AdWords’ Recent Remarketing Changes To Improve Your Account by Sam Owen (@SamOwenPPC)
  26. Using Google Analytics To Collect & Benefit From AdWords Position ROI by Carrie Hill (@carriehill)
  27. Winning The Google Real Estate Game : 5 Google AdWords Tips by Tom Jelneck (@ontarget)

Did I miss your post or a post by someone you know about Adwords? Unintentional! Help me out by leaving a comment below with the link.

Next Brilliant Blogger Topic: Blogging Apps

I’d love to include a link to your post in our next installment– and if you head to the Brilliant Bloggers Schedule, you can see even more upcoming posts. We all have something to learn from one another, so please don’t be shy! Head to the schedule today to learn how to submit your post so I won’t miss it.

How to Earn Money Online with Advertisers

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Jenny Lawson (a.k.a. The Bloggess) has been posting a series of videos answering some of the most common questions she gets asked – and one video that I think might help you guys is this one about making money with advertisers on your blog. You can also adapt this information if you’re a podcasters or web TV producer as well.

Jenny’s blog has nothing to do with blogging and social media, but I still recommend you check it out. It’s hands down one of my favorite blogs of all time! She’ll also be speaking at BlogWorld New York in June, so if you can’t get enough Bloggess, join us there to laugh with us live.

WordPress.com Announces WordAds for Making Money with Your Blog

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Back in October, WordPress.com and Federated Media announced a partnership to help bloggers make money from advertising revenue on their blog. They’re ready to open up the doors and announced today their service called WordAds.

It’s taken WordPress quite awhile to make something like this available and they say it’s because what they had seen as far as advertising, wasn’t very tasteful. And while it seemed Google AdSense was state-of-the-art (at the time), WordPress says “you deserve better than AdSense”.

WordAds won’t be open to everyone. It’s open only by application and to publicly visible blogs with custom domains. Selection for WordAds will be based on traffic levels, engagement, type of content and language used on the blog.

To apply for WordAds, fill out this form.

For those of you who use WordPress.com, will you apply for WordAds?

 

Infographic: What is Google AdWords?

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I’ve experimented with Google AdWords over the 8+ years I’ve been working online and it has definitely seemed like a little bit of a mystery to me. I remember receiving a bill a time or two and thinking “Wow, did this help my ranking or web traffic at all?”

If you’re new to the world of AdWords (or even if you’ve been around for awhile), you might be wondering how it all works and how you can get the best bang for your buck.

WordStream has put together an infographic titled “What Is Google AdWords? How the AdWords Auction Works”. It’s a good resource for companies who would like to know how to cut costs and get better rankings.

It walks you through how Google decides what ads to show and how much you pay, as well as some alternative bidding methods. (Click on the picture to see it in its entirety.)

What is Google AdWords? [ infographic ]

© 2011 WordStream – a certified AdWords partner.

Have you used Google AdWords successfully before? If yes, what’s your secret?

Why You May Want to Say “NO!” to Advertisers

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Advertising space on the sidebar is undoubtedly one of the most popular ways for bloggers to make money. You can use Google or affiliate products to fill ad spots, but it’s always my goal to actually find a sponsor – someone who wants to purchase that advertising space. I don’t have advertising on my career blog or Blog Zombies (yet), but on the blog I write anonymously, I sell anywhere from $300 to $1000 worth of advertising per month. Considering that I don’t have to do much work for that money (most companies approach me), I’d say it’s a pretty sweet deal.

That said, sometimes you have to tell an advertiser the scary n-word: NO! Here are a few situations that I’ve experienced where it was better to just walk away:

  • The product would have hurt my reputation.

Most people are smart enough to realize that just because you have an ad on your sidebar doesn’t mean that you use the product/service or even recommend it. It’s a fine line to walk, though. Before you take someone’s money an slap up a banner, take a moment to check out their business. If they’re doing something shady or selling a low-quality product, your readers could get hurt or lose money, and they’ll associate those negative experiences with you. The best case scenario is always to work with companies for products you like to recommend to others, but at least make sure the advertiser isn’t going to hurt your reputation.

  • You’re driving people to a competitor.

Sometimes, it can make sense to work hand-in-hand with a competitor in your field. For example, I once traded advertising with another blogger selling similar products as mine. It made sense because we both got about the same amount of traffic and offered one another a percentage of the sales. Keep in mind that it’s not always a good idea, though. If you blog about shoes, for example, and the majority of the profit you make comes from selling affiliate products, advertising a discount shoe store on your sidebar where people can go to get the same shoes you’re trying to sell, but at a cheaper price, may not make sense. Think about the potential profit you’ll be using and make sure that the amount you’re charging for the ad is at least twice as much. Otherwise, say no.

  • The advertiser is difficult.

Once, I had someone contact me to ask for advertising rates and traffic information, which I more than happily shared. True story, this is the real email reply I got, name/company removed:

“Hi Allison,

We think your rates are fair, but we’re a small company and need to receive a discount. We can pay $X now and a little more in two weeks to pay for the remainder of the month of advertising. How can we pay you? And don’t say paypal!

Thanks,

Jane, XYZ Company”

I have to read the email several times because I really couldn’t believe it. In some cases, I’m willing to negotiate a price, but to demand a discount for no reason other than the fact that you’re a small company is a little ridiculous. I’m a small company too, so does that mean I should charge more? The “And don’t say paypal!” really made me roll my eyes too. I work with almost all of my clients through this service. Sure, I’m happy to accept a check instead – but not for half a month of advertising from a company that can barely afford to pay it.

The bottom line is that this advertiser clearly showed that it would be difficult to work with her. Could I have used that extra cash? Sure! But my time really isn’t worth the headaches she would likely cause, especially considering that I’d have to deal with her every two weeks.

The bottom line is this: Yes, selling advertising on your blog is a great way to make money, but it doesn’t always make sense. Sometimes, it is okay to say no to advertisers – and for your blog, advertising might be a bad idea altogether. Try to look at the big picture to ensure that advertising is going to have a positive effect on your long-term goals, not just a positive effect on your short-term wallet.

Facebook’s New Virtual Currency is YOUR Reputation

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… by Dennis Yu

What do these 3 things below have in common?

If you guessed advertising, you’re only partly right, since one of the three items is an ad. If you guessed personalized results, you’re warmer, but missing the bigger picture. If you ventured that it’s Facebook’s attempt to mine you for all that you know and what you’re worth; you’re exactly right.

Facebook is a free service in the sense that you’re not paying a monthly subscription fee. It’s ad supported. Verizon charges me a few hundred dollars a month for service, which I’d gladly pay over listening to a 30 second ad every time I wanted to make a call. But Facebook chose to use ads, not subscriptions, to make a profit—yet Facebook users expect service as if they were paying customers.

These freeloaders who don’t pay also don’t realize how their activity continues to build value for Facebook’s advertisers. In this article we’ll explore the mechanics behind this system and why Facebook’s revenues will outstrip Google’s in less than 3 years (provided they have no major privacy bumbles).

Let’s start here: Any information you reveal about yourself on Facebook you can pretty much think of as information you’re handing over to advertisers. Sure, there are privacy settings, but do you know of anyone who actually unchecks the pre-checked box to have personalized ads served to yourself and for your image and name to be included in ads? I consider myself more knowledgeable about the platform than the average Facebook user, and even I’m not sure if it’s fully possible to opt out of things like Sponsored Stories.

Sponsored Stories work tremendously well for advertisers. They should, since these ads show you pictures of YOUR friends, creating the ultimate high school cafeteria, enquiring-minds-want-to-know, rubbernecker situation. Who doesn’t want to keep up with what their friends are doing?

Recently, Sarah Bird, the chief legal expert for SEOmoz, and I had a discussion about whether this is okay. If I’m a fan of SEOmoz, and Facebook uses my image to help SEOmoz, a Facebook advertiser, get more fans— doesn’t that mean SEOmoz is benefiting from my endorsement without asking me for permission? What if the advertiser is not even aware that they are achieving stellar results because of this technique? Is this Facebook’s fault or perhaps no one’s fault at all? What if the profile pictures of 13 year olds are being shown to all sorts of people without parental consent in the United States or other countries that have varying privacy laws?

Before you brand me as a privacy shrew or Facebook hater, let me tell you that I don’t think there’s a significant problem here, and there won’t likely be a problem. Here’s why:

  • People routinely sell their information for almost nothing:

    Give up your email address to earn 5 Farm Dollars? Sure! Sell out 10 friends to get 20 coins in some silly game that has no real world value? Absolutely! How about join an airline loyalty program or sign up for a supermarket rewards card? This has been going on for a long time. If you travel a lot like me, you know that many airports have “free” Wi-Fi that activates only upon you watching an ad. Don’t know about you, but I watch the ad versus pay $10 for 45 minutes.

  • We’ve been testing this for FOUR years inside Facebook:

    It was June of 2007 when Facebook released the F8 platform. To the best of my knowledge, it was our team that first came out with ads within Facebook that were personalized with user profile pictures and names. Facebook came out with Sponsored Stories only a few months ago, but arguably they have learned from what we did. If you remember back in 2007, Facebook’s own ad product, not our 3rd party ad-served unit, were those pesky “flyers”—basically static banner ads that had zero personalization and almost no targeting.

  • Advertiser gain doesn’t have to be consumer loss:

    This is not a zero sum game. Scott Richter, one of the pioneers of online advertising, tells me that spam is really just bad advertising. And I agree. Unwanted, irrelevant ads are like the yellow page books being dropped off at your door, killing who knows how many trees. That stuff on your doorknob or windshield when you get back to your car—that’s spam. But a highly targeted, interesting ad that highlights something your friend did—I would appreciate the recommendation, like a personal concierge of sorts.

  • Most users probably don’t know it’s an ad:

    Now this one is devious. How many blog posts or stock recommendation are written by authors with bias (think Michael Arrington of TechCrunch who writes about companies he has ownership in)? How about the free webinars that are put on by Google and Facebook for how to increase your marketing effectiveness—or even those little tips inside AdWords that keep recommending that you spend more money in various ways? Any content anywhere has hidden bias—even what’s in your News Feed, the super positive reviews posted by restaurant employees, or your comments about your friend’s cooking and whether that dress makes her butt look big. As an advertiser, you pay your email company to send emails on your behalf, so how’s that so different than paying Facebook to send messages to your fans?

Whether the delivery channel requires payment or not, is independent of whether that content is relevant and appreciated by the recipient. Some would argue that if the CPC advertisers pay is dependent upon Quality Score or CTR, that there is a built-in mechanism for good behavior. But we know of a plethora of big advertisers who spent millions on untargeted nonsense.

There is definitely a move towards more personalized, daresay more enjoyable, ads on Facebook. In the research study that we put out in January 2011, we observed that the average CTRs on Facebook were 0.051% in 2010. Some folks took this to mean that Facebook traffic was bad, as opposed to Facebook advertisers being unskilled in their methods.

Even today, the average marketer trying to create social ads is like shoving a bus driver into the cockpit of a fighter jet. They might have driven that bus competently for years, but they are going to need some training for this new vehicle that has so many more knobs to twist. And it’s no wonder that most Facebook advertisers crash and burn.

Last we checked, Facebook made $1.7 billion in 2010—let’s round that up to $2 billion for sake of simple algebra. And Google does about $30 billion a year. So right there, Facebook earns less than 1/15th of Google’s revenue.

Facebook also earns about 30 cents per 1000 impressions served (eCPM). It varies by country, device, and other factors, but we can use this number for now. And Google earns about $80—not 80 cents—per thousand queries. That means Google is 260 times better at extracting value.

Some search die-hards will jump in and say that search queries are more valuable because people were actively looking versus just goofing off when the boss isn’t looking. They will argue that search intent is more valuable than display because the conversion figures prove it. Several PhDs in statistics on staff will calculate it down to the 99%th percentile and 5 significant digits. But they might have overlooked the difference between demand generation and demand collection—and then the distortions that occur in last click attribution.

When marketers are able to give credit to clicks that are non-branded and not navigational, they’ll appreciate the value of word of mouth; which is what Facebook is.

The reality of advertising for us online marketers is that only a fraction of what influences purchase behavior is actually trackable via links and cookies. Marshall Sponder calls this the “ultraviolet” layer. It includes testimonials, peer pressure, TV advertising, and other things in the real world that don’t have pixels attached to them.

When advertisers realize this, and are able to assign value to these “assists”, and have tools that allow them to properly fly their jet aircraft, (punch in the destination, and the autopilot takes over,) then it’s possible that Facebook’s earnings could catch up to Google’s. Further, I believe that Google’s eCPMs will slide over time, as we have witnessed in any channel that matures, since advertisers will not be willing to count conversions that are actually navigational versus search. Maybe Google and Facebook could both meet in the $30 eCPM range.

The price of traffic MUST decrease from a pure economics standpoint. The growth rate in available traffic is outstripping the value of goods being sold, so mechanically this must be true. Unless you double the money supply overnight, a doubling of traffic globally because of more information across more devices on a more connected population gives each ad impression fractionally less value.

Watch as the waters equalize; with Facebook increasing their earnings with traffic being more valuable, and traditional search losing power, as advertisers are smarter about assignment of credit influence and demand generation.

Dennis Yu is Chief Executive Officer of BlitzLocal, a Webtrends partner that builds social media dashboards to measure brand engagement and ROI, specializing in the intersection of Facebook and local advertising. You can reach him on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, his blog, or good old-fashioned email at dennis@blitzlocal.com. BlitzLocal is a leader in social and local advertising and analytics, creating mass micro-targeted campaigns. Mr. Yu is an internationally sought-after speaker and author on all things Facebook, and has been featured in National Public Radio, TechCrunch, Entrepreneur Magazine, CBS Evening News, and other venues.

Is your Show Advertiser Ready?

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Over the past 6 years of working in the new media space the one thing I get asked as great deal by content creators is the question “Is my show advertiser ready?” The answer to that question is really multi-part, and I want to take a few minutes and talk about how to make sure your show is advertiser ready. There are some tips in this video that will put you in the front of the pack when it comes to getting an ad deal with companies like mine, and other firms in the space that help new media creators make a living.

I base this commentary on having executed over 100 podcast advertising campaigns in the past 6 years, with 1000’s of podcasters on advertising buys. Having a show on the web today is a lot more then just strapping on a microphone or flipping a camera on. Yet the steps to set yourself up for success is not that difficult.

 

 

Bringing Advertising to a Neighbor Near You

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Would you cover the outside of your house with advertising in order to have your mortgage paid? Obviously some people are willing, as Adzookie put up a form and thousands have reportedly filled it out.

Here’s what they propose:

We’re looking for houses to paint. In fact, paint is an understatement. We’re looking for homes to turn into billboards. In exchange, we’ll pay your mortgage every month for as long as your house remains painted

Here are a few things we’re looking for. You must own your home. It cannot be rented or leased. We’ll paint the entire outside of the house, minus the roof, the windows and any awnings. Painting will take approximately 3 – 5 days. Your house must remain painted for at least three months and may be extended up to a year. If, for any reason, you decide to cancel after three months or if we cancel the agreement with you, we’ll repaint your house back to the original colors.

I have the same problem with this idea that I have with Twitter users who sell their profile background and bloggers who cover 75% of their blog with Google adsense and advertising spots … it’s hard to take them seriously and not feel like they sold out. And, in all honesty, it’s hard to take the advertiser seriously. While some companies may feel they are thinking “outside the box” or they are getting shock value – I have to wonder if there’s a more positive and tactful way to go about it.

I’ll be curious to see if they follow through on this project, who advertises, and where the houses are located.

Would you do it?

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