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BlogWorld TV: 5 Questions with Mark Lassoff, Interview with Shane Ketterman

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mark Lassoff
mark Lassoff

Mark Lassoff

In this week’s BlogWorld TV, I sit down with Mark Lassoff. He is the co-founder of LearntoProgram.tv – a website that helps people understand different programming languages. If you are looking to learn HTML, AJAX, CSS and HTML5, then check out his site.

Mark talks about his reasons for going to BlogWorld & New Media Expo. He is a business owner who wants to make sure he’s doing things right with social media. Of course, there is also the hint of social media in programming.

Shane Ketterman

Shane Ketterman

I also talk about my newest purchase – the Cerevo Live Shell. I will be walking around BlogWorld & New Media Expo live streaming from the camera. It’s a great experiment in using a single camera stream.

Lastly, I sit down to talk with Shane Ketterman – the BlogWorld & New Media Expo conference director. Shane talks about all the people that put together the tracks, and how he helped coordinate the keynotes. He is really excited to see some of the speakers in this conference. It is definitely impressive.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXX7f9IfbNY[/youtube]

Evan White of Viddy Interview – Future of Publishing

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Why can’t I just upload the video I just shot to Facebook, like I can with my pictures? How come Android makes me upload them to Google+? Well, now you can upload them to Facebook, Twitter, and other social media by using Viddy, an app that lets people do just that and also make minor artistic edits to the videos.

Check out what Murray Newlands and Viddy CMO Evan White had to say at BlogWorld Los Angeles in this Future of Publishing episode:

Future of Publishing is sponsored by VigLink. If you enjoyed the show, be sure check Future of Publishing out online at FutureOfPublishing.tv!

Five Questions with Ray Ortega & Interview with Deb Ng [BlogWorld TV]

Author:
Deb NG

Deb NG talks planning for BlogWorld & New Media Expo

This week on BlogWorld TV, we talk with Deb Ng about her role at BlogWorld & New Media Expo. She talks about how she is hand writing thank-you notes to everyone who registered. We also learn about some prizes you could win while at BlogWorld. Since Deb used to live in New York, she knows a bit about this summer’s host city.

“New York is a totally different vibe than Los Angeles and Las Vegas. They always say the west coast is more laid back than the east coast. I think that’s true. To me, I lived in New York for more than 30 years. When people go to conferences, it’s just another day at the office,” says Deb. “I am looking forward to meeting a totally new group of people, who have a different way to go about this conference thing.”

Ray Ortega will be at BlogWorld & New Media Expo

Ray Ortega will be at BlogWorld & New Media Expo

Also on this episode, I also talk with Ray Ortega from the Podcasters Studio, where he answers five questions for us and talks about what he is expecting during his first BlogWorld & New Media Expo trip. Not only is he attending, he is also speaking.

All this, and your tweets as read by a bad Jerry Seinfeld impersonator.

[youtube width=”550″ height=”394″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4z_dDYX1L6o[/youtube]

Why the Virtual Ticket Will Feel “Even Closer to Being There Live” This Year

Author:

As the guy in charge of BlogWorld’s Virtual Ticket program (which allows people who can’t make it to the live event to “attend” on their own timetable from their home or office), I’ve been given a very interesting puzzle to solve.

Here are the two questions I keep asking myself:

  1. How can we most effectively bring the content and experience of BlogWorld to people who want to go to New York to attend…but can’t?
  2. How can we make an online conference as much like being there in person as possible?

See, BlogWorld is HUGE. There are over 140 speakers, and at the live event, ten sessions will be happening at once…pretty much all the time. Even if it were feasible to live-stream the entire conference to our virtual attendees, we wouldn’t want to.

Why?

Because if we did, then virtual attendees would face the same problem that live attendees face: They’d have to choose one session to watch at a time and would, hence, be physically unable to view 90% of the conference due to most people’s pesky inability to be in ten places at once.

The content in the Virtual Ticket isn’t live. You wouldn’t want it to be live. In fact, a huge number of people who sign up for the Virtual Ticket are people who will be there at the actual event. They get the Virtual Ticket to fill the gaps in their live conference experience, so that after they come home from BlogWorld, they can watch that 90+% of the content that they missed.

(NOTE: If you already signed up to attend BlogWorld in New York and would like to add the Virtual Ticket to your registration, you can do so for only $97. Just email us and ask us to add the VT to your registration. If you haven’t yet signed up for the live event, you can add the VT during the registration process.)

But because the Virtual Ticket’s main content is 100+ hours of non-live video recordings (and the accompanying MP3 downloads), that dilemma comes right back at us. How can we best convey the BlogWorld experience? How can we make it “almost like being there live” for people who can’t be there live if most of our Virtual Ticket content is not live?

And the answer, of course, is that we can’t. But we can come close.

See, there’s nothing like attending a conference. If you’re actually there in person, you’ll get the networking and handshaking and hanging out and the strange “inspiration osmosis” that comes from being in the live atmosphere. We can’t replace that, and it’d be insulting to suggest that we could.

But I asked myself…what would be close? What would help simulate an in-person experience as much as possible?

And the solution came back loud and clear: Provide daily content.

The recordings — which you can play, pause, and replay at will for a full six months on the website (or forever if you download them) — will show up about a week after BlogWorld ends. For the Los Angeles 2011 Virtual Ticket, we did a bunch of video interviews — behind the scenes stuff, intended to give that “at the conference feel” — and we provided those about a week after the event, too. And that was cool.

But this year, in addition to all of that (and with an upgrade in video and audio quality for the bonus interviews), we’re going to give Virtual Ticketholders content every day.

There’s something different about daily updates. If you get daily updates, then you can learn about Day 1 stuff while it’s still Day 1. And if you learn about something on Day 1, then you can see what happens with it on Day 2 and follow along.

In other words, daily content gets you immersed in the experience so you don’t feel like you’re just watching from the sidelines.

So, in addition to the 100+ recorded sessions, in addition to the bonus video interviews that are exclusive to the Virtual Ticket, and in addition to our prolific social media activity and picture-sharing from the conference floor, we’re adding two things to this year’s Virtual Ticket:

  1. Every day, we’re going to record a handful of audio interviews and behind-the-scenes segments. And every evening, we’re going to post those files on the Virtual Ticket site for attendees to listen to.
  2. Every evening, we’re going to write up a daily recap. We’ll tell VT attendees who we captured on video that they’ll be able to watch later, we’ll tell them about big happenings, and we’ll tell them if we spot The Bloggess eating a burrito for lunch. (Or if she brought her giant metal chicken “Beyonce” with her.)

Will this content make the Virtual Ticket “just like being in New York”? Of course not. But will it bring Virtual Ticketholders into the fold, finally making them a PART of BlogWorld as it unfolds instead of sitting on the sidelines, waiting patiently for the event to end and for the session content to be delivered to the private Virtual Ticket website.

If you can’t make it to New York this year, check out this year’s BlogWorld Virtual Ticket if you haven’t done so already. The price is only $347, and you won’t have to book a flight or a hotel room. Good luck finding this insane amount of content for that price anywhere else.

And if you’re attending live in New York, definitely consider adding the Virtual Ticket when you register for BlogWorld so that you can go back after the event and review the huge amount of content you missed while you were there live. It’s only $97, and will be the best conference bang-for-your-buck you ever spend. (NOTE: If you’ve already registered and want to add the VT now, you can’t do that through the website. Please email us and let us know you want to add the VT and we’ll add it for you.)

Five Questions with C.C. Chapman – Interview with Cliff Ravenscraft – BlogWorld TV

Author:

C.C. Chapman will be at BlogWorld & New Media Expo signing his book, Content Rules.

Today, C.C. Chapman is our featured “Five Questions with” guest in the latest episode of BlogWorld TV. We’ll find out what C.C. is looking forward to at BlogWorld & New Media Expo New York (he’ll be signing his book, Content Rules, there!) and his plans to visit Book Expo America (BEA), which is co-located with BlogWorld.

Cliff Ravenscraft

Cliff Ravenscraft talks about putting together the Podcasting Track at BlogWorld & New Media Expo

In this installment of BlogWorld TV, Jeffrey also talks with Cliff Ravenscraft about his involvement in BlogWorld & New Media Expo, his revamp of the podcasting track, and the new podcast he is producing for BlogWorld, called The Podcast Report. Finally, we’ll hear from Rick Calvert (CEO, BlogWorld & New Media Expo) and Scott Monty (Head of Social Media for Ford). All within this BlogWorld TV episode.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klVWdjFcY0A[/youtube]

 

 

Chris Brogan Interview

Author:

Murray Newlands interviewed Chris Brogan, marketing consultant and author of Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation, and Earn Trust, at BlogWorld 2011. In the interview, the duo talked about how to create content especially for social media and the web. Unlike television content, which is usually a one-way street, online marketing video content needs to engage with the audience and really reach out to them to be effective. Watch the interview below:

Editor’s Note: To see Chris live and in person, come check out his keynote presentation at BlogWorld New York, “Power Up Your Blog: Lessons Learned Over 11 Years of Blogging.”

Future of Publishing is sponsored by VigLink.

How Will You Use Open Google+ Hangouts?

Author:

Recently, Google opened up Google+ Hangouts so everyone can broadcast on air (previously, this function was only available to a select few). Hangouts are the best Google+ function in my opinion, so I’m excited to see this change. When you’re hanging out, you can also embed to stream on your site, and it will record and post to YouTube automatically. Here’s a video showing what people are doing with Google+ On Air Hangouts:

So the question is…how will you use this new function? Here are just a few ideas for online content creators:

  • Run weekly online course
  • Broadcast a webinar to promote a product
  • Hold a Q&A session with fans
  • Hold weekly meetings for a virtual club or group.
  • Record podcasts live

And of course…you can just hang out with friends and fans online this way, allowing others to join or just watch if they are too shy.

How will you be using Google+ On Air Hangouts? Leave a comment below!

Feeling unsure about being on camera? Check out Perry Lawrence’s Video Podcasting session at BlogWorld New York this June. We also have a complete Web TV track you can check to learn more about making the most of videos online.

Five Questions with Daniel Lewis: BlogWorld New York [Video]

Author:
Daniel Lewis
Daniel Lewis

Daniel Lewis of the Ramen Noodle Podcast answers Five Questions

Are you going to BlogWorld New Media Expo New York? Let everyone know – we will have opportunities for your voice to be heard!

In this first episode of BlogWorld TV, Jeffrey Powers of Geekazine makes the call out to the public. If you are going to BlogWorld New York, feel free to create a 10-second video (send it to jeff@blogworldexpo.com) and he’ll add it to future episodes. All you have to do is get on camera and say:

My name is ________ and I am going to BlogWorld & New Media Expo in New York June 5-7!

Also, in today’s BlogWorld TV segment, Jeffrey talks with Daniel Lewis of the Ramen Noodle Podcast. Daniel will be speaking on two BlogWorld panel sessions in New York, “Podcasting 101, Parts 1 & 2”. Today, we find out what Daniel plans to do in New York in June, if there are any social media rockstars he wants to meet, and which social network he promotes.

 

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlWwdDt6mrI[/youtube]

Google and The Borg Have More in Common than You’d Think, At Least on YouTube

Author:

You will join Google+. Resistance is futile. At least, if Google has anything to say about it.

Google is currently testing out a new “like” button for YouTube so users will be forced to join Google+ if they want to give videos a thumbs up rating. If you aren’t logged in, you can still watch videos, but you can’t rate them. Not everyone is seeing this button change yet (for example, I still have the old like button), but more and more people are starting to notice this change.

If you haven’t seen it already, celebrity blogger and Star Trek alum Wil Wheaton recently posted a pretty strongly-worded message to Google on Tumblr after becoming aware of the new button:

Oh, go f*** yourself, Google. This is just as bad as companies forcing me to “like” something on Facebook before I can view whatever it is they want me to “like.”

Just let me thumbs up something, without forcing me to “upgrade” to G+, you d***heads.

He elaborated upon that rant in a longer post on his blog, saying,

By crippling functionality on sites Google owns (like YouTube) and forcing users to “upgrade” to a service that they may not want or need to get that functionality back, Google is making a huge and annoying mistake.

Amen to that. Google+ is not dead, but I’m guessing the company has been disappointed with this network so far. Based on the hype when it initially launched, I think they expected it to take over Facebook and perhaps even Twitter. While Google+ isn’t a failure (yet), it also hasn’t really done those things. Super intelligent, long conversations possible on Google+, but the general public is still sticking with Facebook for now, at least for the most part. Does that mean Google+ can never succeed? No. But at the moment, they’re fighting a losing battle and making poor decisions.

Google is  like a cornered animal. Instead of being smart and coming up with a good get away plan, they’re just peeing all over in fear and charging at your face snarling, both of which are not good options.

The Google+ button on YouTube is an attempt to force people to use their network if they want to continue using a service they love (YouTube). But forcing people on the internet to do anything typically doesn’t work out very well.

Beyond that, Google isn’t seeing the big picture. Will some people break down and join Google+ if it’s necessary for YouTube liks? Maybe. But they aren’t going to use the platform in most cases. They’re just doing it because they have a gun to their back. They’re joining so YouTube is still functional. And those who don’t join Google+? They’re simply going to stop liking videos. That’s bad news for content creators, and what’s bad for the people putting videos online is bad for YouTube in general. Fewer likes = less funding for content creators = fewer videos = less traffic.

Assimilation by force never goes very well. On the other hand, if you create ingenious products and tools with the consumer in mind, people will be begging to join your ranks. Look at Pinterest. Millions upon millions of users have joined over the past few months and not one of them has been forced.

I think Neil Gaiman said it best in his reply to Wil’s post:

I wish Google would leave the Social Network thing to others. When Google does what it does, and does it well, it changes the world. When it rides bandwagons, it’s irritating.

Google has amazing abilities. Why do they have to take over every part of the Internet? Why be a jack of all trades when you already are the master of one?

I sincerely hope that Google rethinks this Google+ YouTube button. They can still put such a button there – just give us a way to like without connecting as well. I think that’s a fair compromise. But even better would be to simply leave the like button as it is currently. I’m on board with changes when they’re good, but this one just plain stinks.

What do you think of the new Google+ button on YouTube? If Google makes this change permanent, will you sign up for/log into Google+ so you can use it? Or will you just avoid rating videos from now on?

Original image (sans text) via thms.nl at Flickr’s Creative Commons.

Scott Monty Interview – Ford’s Social Media Manager – BlogWorld 2011 Los Angeles

Author:

At last year’s Blog World, Future of Publishing host Murray Newlands interviewed Ford’s social media manager Scott Monty about social media marketing, outreach, and other topics. In this interview, Scott talk about Ford’s social media outreach efforts and how a big, “traditional” company can embrace new mediums of communication. What Scott says might surprise you:

In addition to running Ford’s social media presence, Scott also owns a widely-read social media blog called The Social Marketing Blog, which gives him an outlet to share his expertise among social media professionals.

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