Looking for Something?
Browsing Category

Statistics & Trends

Blogging Statistics Show Most Bloggers are Young and Living in the USA

Author:

Sysomos analyzed more than 100 million blog posts that provided information about their age, gender and location information to gather blogging statistics. In a report released this month, they say that bloggers tend to be:

  • Between 21-35 years of age (53.3%)

  • Male or Female (females outweighed males by a mere 1.8%)
  • Living in the United States (29.2%)
  • Living in California (14.1%)

So are you in the majority or minority?

Other news and tips across the blogosphere this week (June 4th):

Copyblogger: How to Build a Successful Business With a Small Audience
We all want our businesses and blogs to grow. But not all growth is ideal or even beneficial. Sometimes blind growth can be harmful.

Daily Blogging Tips: 8 Tips for Conducting Effective Interviews with Bloggers
Learn the best ways to approach bloggers and conduct an interview.

ProBlogger: How to Stay Focused and Avoid Distraction as a Blogger
Check out Darren’s video that talks through some of the distractions that bloggers face as well as his simple 3 point strategy for staying focused.

ReadWriteWeb: Twitter Ad Changes: Who’s Affected, Who’s Not
After earlier news that Twitter Ad Networks would be affected by the inability to place instream ads, it seems like it may not be the case. Twitter ad networks are not at risk, but Twitter client applications are.

Mashable: Google Testing New Ad Format for Boosting Twitter Followers
Google has put together a new kind of display ad that lets advertisers attract more followers to their Twitter accounts.

Nikki Katz is the Managing Editor for the BlogWorld Blog. Feel free to follow her Twitter @nikki_blogworld and @katzni

Image Credit: SXC

The Tricks of Twitter Trending

Author:

I’ve always been intrigued by the Twitter trending topics, although I rarely participate in them. I’m not really in the demographic for #bieberfan but I do like a good #FF!

After participating in a recent online Twitter chat, with what seemed like a ton of users tweeting at once, I wondered exactly how many tweets is does it take to get to the center of a Twitter trend?

It’s not as easy as you’d think. You can’t just post a hashtag repeatedly in your own tweets every second and hope that it trends. The trend depends on a vast number of people tweeting at the same time – not just you and your friends.

Buzzgain did some analysis about the number of users and tweets during various times and came to this conclusion (times in PST):

  • From 12:00 am – 6:00 am you need approximately 1200 tweets and about 500 users to be trending.

  • From 6:00 am to 12:00 pm you need approximately 1700 tweets and about 733 users to be trending.
  • From 12:00 pm to 6:00 pm you need approximately 1500 tweets and about 812 users to be trending.
  • From 6:00 pm to 12:00 am you need approximately 1900 tweets and about 922 users to be trending.

What items tend to trend faster?

  • Topics pushed by users with a ton of followers. This makes the topic easier to distribute.

  • Topics based on breaking news. This doesn’t have to be a national disaster – it could be a new technology release or a celebrity break up.
  • Topics that are expected. #musicmonday, #followfriday, etc.

Did you know that BlogWorld helped set a Twitter record and trending topic?

During the BlogWorld & New Media Expo 2009, there was an effort to tweet #BeatCancer as a fundraiser for four cancer-related organizations — Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, Bright Pink, Spirit Jump, and Stand Up for Cancer.

The effort took off quickly, showing up as the #1 trending topic. During the 24-hour period from October 16 to October 17, the phrase was mentioned more than 209,000 times (verified and documented by Guinness!) And over $70,000 was raised.

Want to see past trends? Visit trendistic for a cool chart view!

Nikki Katz is the Managing Editor for the BlogWorld Blog. Feel free to follow her Twitter @nikki_blogworld and @katzni

Top Ten Ways to Draw Readers To Your Blog

Author:

Jane Boursaw

One of the most fun things about blogging is drawing readers to your site and creating a sense of community on your blog. There’s no secret formula to this. It mainly involves following a few simple guidelines that will bring readers to your blog and keep them coming back for more. Here are my top ten ways to do this.

  1. Be reliable. As with any type of writing, make sure you know what you’re talking about. If you’re blogging about a breaking news story, make sure you’ve got the facts right. Link back to the original story, so that people know you’re not making it up as you go along. On the flip side, don’t be afraid to ask a few questions, to give the readers something to comment on and talk about.

  2. Write lists. There’s something about lists that readers and other bloggers love. They contain a lot of information, they’re neatly ordered, easy for readers to skim through, and easy for other bloggers to link to. While you don’t want to overdo it on the lists, adding them into the mix now and then is a great idea. You could even create a brand, like the TV Squad Ten and Film Gecko Five.
  3. End your post with a question. That’s a call for immediate action, and when a reader sees it, they automatically start thinking of an answer and are more inclined to leave a comment. It can be as simple as asking readers for their own ‘Fringe’ theories or asking what TV guys have the best girly scream.
    Continue Reading

What Is The Next Big Event?

Author:

Do you have an event, conference or meeting, besides of course our event which I just talked about, that you want us to know about?   CES was a huge event in Las Vegas last week, and our very own Rick Calvert and Patti Hosking was in attendance along with the reported 150,000 other people all wanting to see what the next cool thing was in consumer electronics.  We at BlogWorld & New Media Expo love to attnd these types of events and we plan to make sure we have someone that can make it to help promote our show and to also report on what we see in the industry and trends and news.  The problem is, it is tough for us to keep track of all of the events in our industry.

Mashable, RWW, TechCrunch and others all have calendars of events and we tend to keep our eyes on those lists to make sure we see all of the events that are reported in those industries, but event they don’t have a handle on all of them.  What I want to know is what are your events?  Are yopu running something that we shoudl attend?  Do you have a conference, or a show, or a trade event in an industry that doesn’t necessarily fit into the tech world or maybe it is on the fringe of social media, or other places you think we should know?  What about in other countries, are you planning on having a show in your city and in your country not in the United States?

With the number of categories our convention and trade show covers, with real estate, business, sports, military service, technology, monetization, politics, etc, etc.  What events are not being publicized that we should attend?  Leave a comment and URL here if you have an event we should notice.  I am also going to start compiling a list of events that are brought to our attention as we want to help you promote your event as much as our own.  If we can make a hub for people to come and find events in the new media world, we would love to help.

I think the next big thing that we may be attending is Affiliate Summit West again in Las Vegas.  Many of our friends and track leaders and speakers all attend that event on affiliate marketing.  Will we be seeing you there?

5 Things Your Spouse Won't Understand About Blogging

Author:

blog

Thinking of getting into blogging? I hope you have a good support group at home. It’s especially helpful if your spouse is someone who “gets” blogging and social media. If not, be prepared for lots of questions.

5 Things Your Spouse Won’t Understand About Blogging

1. Why you spend so much time blogging

It’s hard to explain why frequently updated content is important or why you need to keep your community apprised of the latest news and products in your niche. Not every spouse understands having to strike while the creative itch is happening or needing to get stuff written down while it’s fresh in your head. Try explaining to someone who doesn’t quite understand that you need to update every day even while on vacation because you don’t want to lose traffic and revenue, or cause your community to go elsewhere for their fix.

2. Blogging is more than typing some words and hitting “publish”

Spouses (spice?) don’t always understand how there’s more to blogging than just typing. We have to analyze traffic, keywords, and more. We have to research advertisers and keep on top of the latest news and trends in our niches. We have to visit other blogs and comment to share community. The truth is, blogging is a full time job even though most bloggers aren’t able to put in a full time effort.

3. Spending time on the social networks is part of blogging

Yes honey, I really AM working when I’m on FaceBook and Twitter. Though I began blogging long before Twitter, it’s been an immense help in growing my blog network. Social networks give me a chance to interact with members of my community, meet others, and find new clients and advertisers. Social networks also put me in touch with other like-minded people with whom I’m launching or discussing new projects.

4. Money doesn’t happen right away

It takes time to build up traffic and revenue. Money doesn’t happen overnight. In many cases it takes years. The truth is, many bloggers abandon their blogs because they don’t pay off after a few months.  My blog used to bring in a few hundred dollars a month after the first year. Almost five years later and I’m just about making a full time salary. With blogging slow and steady always wins the race.

5. Meetups and Tweetups aren’t unsafe

Remember how we used to warn everyone about meeting people they talk to online. Try explaining Tweetups. “But honey, I’m just going to meet the people I talk to on Twitter. ”  There’s still danger in meeting peple from online, but there’s also safety in numbers. Tweetups are always held in very public places with plenty of others invited. It’s not like meeting a stranger in a dark alley. Be sensible and you’ll be fine.

5 Things Your Spouse Won’t Understand About Blogging

Author:

blog

Thinking of getting into blogging? I hope you have a good support group at home. It’s especially helpful if your spouse is someone who “gets” blogging and social media. If not, be prepared for lots of questions.

5 Things Your Spouse Won’t Understand About Blogging

1. Why you spend so much time blogging

It’s hard to explain why frequently updated content is important or why you need to keep your community apprised of the latest news and products in your niche. Not every spouse understands having to strike while the creative itch is happening or needing to get stuff written down while it’s fresh in your head. Try explaining to someone who doesn’t quite understand that you need to update every day even while on vacation because you don’t want to lose traffic and revenue, or cause your community to go elsewhere for their fix.

2. Blogging is more than typing some words and hitting “publish”

Spouses (spice?) don’t always understand how there’s more to blogging than just typing. We have to analyze traffic, keywords, and more. We have to research advertisers and keep on top of the latest news and trends in our niches. We have to visit other blogs and comment to share community. The truth is, blogging is a full time job even though most bloggers aren’t able to put in a full time effort.

3. Spending time on the social networks is part of blogging

Yes honey, I really AM working when I’m on FaceBook and Twitter. Though I began blogging long before Twitter, it’s been an immense help in growing my blog network. Social networks give me a chance to interact with members of my community, meet others, and find new clients and advertisers. Social networks also put me in touch with other like-minded people with whom I’m launching or discussing new projects.

4. Money doesn’t happen right away

It takes time to build up traffic and revenue. Money doesn’t happen overnight. In many cases it takes years. The truth is, many bloggers abandon their blogs because they don’t pay off after a few months.  My blog used to bring in a few hundred dollars a month after the first year. Almost five years later and I’m just about making a full time salary. With blogging slow and steady always wins the race.

5. Meetups and Tweetups aren’t unsafe

Remember how we used to warn everyone about meeting people they talk to online. Try explaining Tweetups. “But honey, I’m just going to meet the people I talk to on Twitter. ”  There’s still danger in meeting peple from online, but there’s also safety in numbers. Tweetups are always held in very public places with plenty of others invited. It’s not like meeting a stranger in a dark alley. Be sensible and you’ll be fine.

Bloggers Have Mad Skills – Pay them Accordingly!

Author:

work-via-stock-xchnge1

I have a bone to pick. Something’s sticking in my craw and I need to get it out. Lately I’m coming across ad after ad for bloggers – yet no one is willing to pay for the work. Instead they’re offering “exposure” and “internships.” Hello? I’m exposed every time I walk out my front door, thank you very much, and internships offer something besides toiling away for nothing for Joe No Name. Bloggers have skills. Mad skills. Their pay should be reflective of all the work they do.

Let me break it down for the people who think bloggers should be happy to work for the glory.

Writing – Bloggers are passionate about their topics. They have to be in order to write about the same thing day in and day out. The reason businesses and individuals hire bloggers is because they don’t have the time or inclination to do so themselves. However, it’s not an “easy” job. A blogger must stay on top of all the current trends, technology and research, and write about it in a manner representative of his or her client. Bloggers don’t necessarily write off the top of their heads. There’s research to conduct, books, articles and blog posts to read, and experts to interview. Though blog posts have a casual tone, they are written in a professional manner. This alone warrants a decent pay check.

Coding -Yeah we have to know a little HTML or other coding necessary to embed images, videos and have our blog posts formatted in a manner befitting the content. Yes, a lot networks and content portals handle this sort of thing on their own. However, many clients want a blogger who can work on his own without having to call in the techies every five minutes.

Web Design – Many bloggers handle template design and other design elements for their clients’ blogs. This takes a bit of skill. Not everyone knows the best places to place widgets and ads. Not everyone can create an eye pleasing header or clean sidebar.

Community Management – Most clients are looking for bloggers because they want to create a community to help create buzz around a product or service. This means bloggers are expected to moderate and respond to posts. They answer questions, soothe tempers and keep the conversation flowing.

Public Relations/Marketing – If you’re expecting your bloggers to promote their content, this should be reflected in the pay. Building up relationships and networking is a job in itself, let alone for a blogger who is doing it for the glory.

SEO– SEO is a learned skill. It doesn’t come naturally. Knowing how to catapult a blog to number one on the search engines is something that should be handsomely rewarded.

Tell me again why bloggers aren’t worthy of pay?

What are some of the mad skills you have as a blogger?

Twitter: The Best Job Search Tool Ever

Author:

twitter

Twitter fascinates me. If I could, I’d spend the entire day watching the current trends and following shared links. Sometimes I lurk, and watch other conversations unfold, other times I’m an active participant. With my Tweet deck open I can monitor several talks at once. It’s a beautiful thing.

Because my blog is about freelancing and finding work, I tend to monitor job hunting tweets most often. Here’s what I’m noticing:

The Twitter community wants to help others find work: If I were to Tweet that I was looking for work, the echo effect would take place. My news would be retweeted several times over. Should an attractive job come along for which I’m qualified, it would be brought to my attention via @’s and DM’s. Twitter impresses me. After moving away from a city where neighbors didn’t take the time to get to know each other, and people were suspicious of me for going out of my way to help the elderly folks upstairs, I dig the vibe. Twitter is community at its best.

There are lots of jobs being advertised on Twitter: Holy cats there are a lot of jobs out there! Don’t believe me? Set up your Tweet Deck to include searches for jobs in your profession and see what happens. Twitter services such as Job Angels not only alert followers to available opportunities, but they also tweet out job hunters’ details.

Jobs in social media are hot: Everyone wants to be a community manager and everyone is a social media expert (we’ll talk more on that last one another time). As soon as a social media job is tweeted, the Twitterers take note. Retweets abound. Mind you, this probably creates a lot of competition, but since most of the jobs are location specific (more on THAT at a later time as well), there’s not a whole lot to worry about. Suffice it to say there is an abundance of social media opportunities on Twitter. Partake.

Twitter Search is the best source on the web for finding work: Two terrific sources for finding work are Twitter Search or Twitter Job Search. Go ahead, give it a try….I’ll wait.

See what I mean? Type in “Freelance writing jobs”, “social media jobs” or “community manager” and you’ll get turned on to leads or links to job opportunties you never knew existed.

All the job boards are on Twitter: Follow your favorite job boards because they tweet out tasty tidbits. Blogs specialzing in jobs and careers are also known to drop a gem or two. Pretty soon everyone on Twitter will be employed and the only folks without work are the ones who don’t get it.

How do you use Twitter for your job search?

Social Media Usage Statistics

Author:

A guest post by Dan Zarrella on NowSourcing provides some fascinating information into how savvy social media users share and spread content around the web.  Dan is a social media scientist who says:

“The research I did on viral content sharing shows that frequent users of social web technologies like Twitter, blogs, and social news and networking sites tend to share online content with more people, more often than those that do not. This means that for marketers these users can be a powerful vector for making content go viral.”

Among one of the many interesting findings from Dan’s study is that when users want to share content on a one-to-one basis, blogs appear to be the preferred method of information distribution.  I find it interesting that blogs are so popular in one-to-one sharing relationships, I would have thought that blogs would have been more widely used for broadcast messages that are designed to reach a large group of people.

If you want more information from the report you can get it by visiting this link.  You may have to register to view the full report or you can visit the above link from Nowsourcing to get a brief snippet.  I do not have information as to how the data was obtained or what sources data was obtained from, this is something you get once you register with Dan.

did you check out the post on Nowsourcing, where you surprised by any of the results?

check out my blog

follow me on twitter

Learn About NMX

NEW TWITTER HASHTAG: #NMX

Recent Comments

Follow Us on Twitter

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. (Please Confirm Your Subscription by Visiting Your Inbox)

Categories

Archives