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October 2008

We Will Miss You Dean Barnett

Author:

I didn’t know Dean Barnett that well. We had only met once in person last year at BlogWorld, had one phone conversation and a few email exchanges. What I do know is that he was a brilliant man and among his many other accomplishments a great blogger, writer,radio host, avid golfer and rabid Red Sox fan.

He was always kind to me and if you read the remembrances on both the left and right side of the political blogosphere you will see this is the kind of person Dean Barnett was. A staunch conservative who definitely fit the description of a Happy Warrior, Dean had many friends an admirers on the left including Andrew Sullivan, and Glenn Greenwald (scroll to the bottom of Greenwald’s post for his comments about Dean). Dean would host Greenwald as a guest on the Hugh Hewitt Show when he was sitting in for Hugh. Here is Dean’s review of one of Greenwald’s most recent book:

I KNOW THIS WON’T endear me to many of my fellow conservatives, but I like Glenn Greenwald. I’ve spoken to him a few times on the radio and have enjoyed our jousts. Mind you, I agree with virtually nothing Greenwald says or writes and recognize his unbecoming fondness for the personal insult, but I consider him a worthy adversary.

Like most things that spring from Glenn Greenwald’s keyboard, Great American Hypocrites is a combination of literate insights, occasional distortions, and forays into ugliness that are difficult to understand given Greenwald’s obvious intelligence. In other words, the book is filled with the Good, the Bad, and the distinctly Greenwald.

Glenn had this to say today when he learned of Barnett’s passing:

UPDATE:  Really sad, horrendous news:  Dean Barnett has died, at the age of 41, of cystic fibrosis.  I wrote about Dean here a couple of weeks ago, in the bottom section of the post.  Here’s a 2006 article by Dean, bravely writing about his battle with that horrific disease.  And here’s a very recent interview he gave about many things, including the times he invited me to appear with him when he guest-hosted The Hugh Hewitt Show.  Condolences to his family and friends.Dean could find common ground and goodness in people with whom he had nothing in common. Dean Barnett made the blogosphere as a whole a better place.

Hugh is remembering his good friend on the radio today. You can listen live on KRLA here and read what Hugh had to say on his blog about Dean here:

My friend and colleague Dean Barnett died today, and the world is a much poorer place for it.  As anyone who listened to him on my radio show or read his work at Soxblog, here or at the Weekly Standard knows, and as everyone who had the great, great pleasure of knowing Dean will attest, Dean’s combination of sparking intelligence and enormous good humor made him one of the most memorable of friends.  What too few people know, though, is what a kind, extraordinarily giving and compassionate man he was.  Dean loved people and he loved this country and threw himself into every cause.

You can tell much about a man by what his adversaries as well as his friends have to say about him when he is gone. By all accounts Dean Barnett was just a decent man.

Please pray for his family and loved ones tonight and join me in mourning the loss of a great blogger.  Thank you for all you gave us and rest in peace Dean Barnett.

More at Memeorandum.

Jim Geraghty remembers Dean Barnett.

Gateway Pundit has a photo of Dean at last year’s BlogWorld. That is exatly how I remember him. Always smiling.

Meeting Doc Searls At BlogWorld

Author:

One of the real honors for me at this year’s BlogWorld was getting to meet and speak with legendary blogger Doc Searls.

For those of you who don’t know who Doc is, the bio on his blog is a good place to start. Among his many accomplishments Doc has been blogging since 1999 and was one of the four authors of the ground breaking blog and best selling book The Cluetrain Manifesto.

Here is an interview Abby Prince-Johnson from WebPronews conducted with Doc while at BlogWorld.

Blogworld Speaker Interviews: Patrick O'Keefe

Author:

Yeah, I know, I’m a bit late with this one. Somehow Patrick’s interview fell through the cracks but he’s an interesting chap and I wanted to get this out. So let’s just secretly agree we’ll pretend this was posted just before the Expo, not afterwards, okay? :-)

Q: In two sentences, highlight your background and professional experience to date. One bonus sentence: how’d you get started blogging?

I own the iFroggy Network, a network of websites, and I’m the author of “Managing Online Forums“, a practical guide to managing online communities and social spaces. I’ve been developing websites for about 10 years and managing online communities for around 8. For me, blogging is an extension of what we’ve been doing for a very, very long time – creating content – but as far as calling it “blogging” specifically; 2004, I guess.

Q: How often do you blog?  What platform do you use?  Why?

Patrick O'Keefe

Patrick O'Keefe

I blog multiple times per day. I blog at YanksBlog.com, ManagingCommunities.com, Bad Boy Blog, my personal blog and elsewhere. Right now, I use Nucleus CMS and WordPress and I am very slowly converting my Nucleus CMS sites to WordPress. I like WordPress due to it’s ease of use, reliability and excellent plugin community.

Q: Point us to one or two recent postings on your blog that you think were superb, and tell us a bit about your writing process. How long did it take for you to come up with the topic?  How long to write?

Post #1: “Five Things Bad Boy Needs to Do to Improve it’s Online Strategy” on Bad Boy Blog

In this post, I took a good strong look at what Bad Boy Entertainment, a record label and company that I’m a big fan of, could do online to improve it’s strategy and, as such, make more money. This post is the result of my years of watching the company and how it operates, as well as the network of contacts that I have made within it. My writing process was rather straight forward, as I have a great deal of knowledge about this subject. I came up with the topic randomly while working and the article itself took me probably 4-5 hours to write and tweak.

Post #2: “Has Anyone Called You Hitler, Stalin or Gestapo? (or “How I Know Iím Doing My Job”)” on ManagingCommunities.com

I like this post just because it’s so true. The topic came to me randomly and it took me an hour or two to write it up. The writing process pulled upon my experience managing communities and being the one that people direct their anger at, when they are told that they are unable to do something.

Q: How often do you leave comments on other people’s blogs?  How do you find their entries in the first place?

I would say on a virtual daily basis. I do most of my blog reading through my feedreader, Bloglines. So, that is how I find the entries.

Q: Tell us a bit about your talk at Blogworld Expo. Topic, key points you’ll cover, etc?

I have a book signing and two panels, all on Sunday, September 21. The book signing is at 10:00 AM PT. After that, the first panel is at 12:15 PM PT and it’s called “How to Deal with Trolls, Spammers and Sock Puppets.” I’ll be joined by Rick Calvert, the founder of Blog World Expo, John Chow of JohnChowDotCom (http://www.johnchow.com) and Jeremy Schoemaker of ShoeMoney (http://www.shoemoney.com). We’ll talk about how to deal with these difficult types of visitors and members. How to view their comments and how to manage them.

The second panel is at 3:00 PM PT and it’s called “Avoiding Disaster: How Not to Use Social Media.” On this one, I’ll be joined by Darren Rowse of ProBlogger (http://www.problogger.net) and b5media (http://www.b5media.com), Lee LeFever of Common Craft (http://www.commoncraft.com) and Jason Falls of Social Media Explorer (http://www.socialmediaexplorer.com) and Doe-Anderson (http://www.doeanderson.com).

I really feel that you learn as much from what not to do and who you don’t want to be, as you do about best practices and examples. So, that’s what this panel will focus on. We’ll talk about ways that you can damage your brand through your actions on social media outlets, such as communities, forums, blogs, social networking sites, social bookmarking and everything in between.

Q: How do you recommend new folk best experience a major conference and expo like Blogworld Expo?

This sounds funny, I guess, since I have a signing and two panels, but don’t get overly caught up in following a schedule and going to panels and being here and there. Mark your must haves and get to them, but for me, the best part of these conferences has been in networking and meeting people. And some of the best networking you do is in the hallways, at the parties, etc. Panels are great, but you don’t want to be running from place to place and forget to actually meet people and network.

I admit that I’m not the most experienced conference attendee, though. This will be just the second tech conference I’ve been to, following this year’s South by Southwest. I attended 1 panel, 1 core conversation and a handful of book readings or portions of them (mainly so that I could see what they were about before I gave mine). And yet, I don’t regret it. I had a great time and I met a lot of people. It was great. I’m looking forward to Blog World Expo being similar.

Q: Easy ones: Mac or PC?  Ipod or Zune?  Iphone or Blackberry?

I use PCs. I use Windows Vista Ultimate on both my desktop and laptop. My MP3 player is actually a Creative Zen Xtra, but I do have an iPod Nano that I received for free, in a giveaway, that I keep plugged into a speaker next to my bed. Cell phone wise, I don’t use one! *gasp*


Thanks for playing our game, Patrick. Hope you had a great experience at Blogworld Expo 2008.

Blogworld Speaker Interviews: Patrick O’Keefe

Author:

Yeah, I know, I’m a bit late with this one. Somehow Patrick’s interview fell through the cracks but he’s an interesting chap and I wanted to get this out. So let’s just secretly agree we’ll pretend this was posted just before the Expo, not afterwards, okay? :-)

Q: In two sentences, highlight your background and professional experience to date. One bonus sentence: how’d you get started blogging?

I own the iFroggy Network, a network of websites, and I’m the author of “Managing Online Forums“, a practical guide to managing online communities and social spaces. I’ve been developing websites for about 10 years and managing online communities for around 8. For me, blogging is an extension of what we’ve been doing for a very, very long time – creating content – but as far as calling it “blogging” specifically; 2004, I guess.

Q: How often do you blog?  What platform do you use?  Why?

Patrick O'Keefe

Patrick O'Keefe

I blog multiple times per day. I blog at YanksBlog.com, ManagingCommunities.com, Bad Boy Blog, my personal blog and elsewhere. Right now, I use Nucleus CMS and WordPress and I am very slowly converting my Nucleus CMS sites to WordPress. I like WordPress due to it’s ease of use, reliability and excellent plugin community.

Q: Point us to one or two recent postings on your blog that you think were superb, and tell us a bit about your writing process. How long did it take for you to come up with the topic?  How long to write?

Post #1: “Five Things Bad Boy Needs to Do to Improve it’s Online Strategy” on Bad Boy Blog

In this post, I took a good strong look at what Bad Boy Entertainment, a record label and company that I’m a big fan of, could do online to improve it’s strategy and, as such, make more money. This post is the result of my years of watching the company and how it operates, as well as the network of contacts that I have made within it. My writing process was rather straight forward, as I have a great deal of knowledge about this subject. I came up with the topic randomly while working and the article itself took me probably 4-5 hours to write and tweak.

Post #2: “Has Anyone Called You Hitler, Stalin or Gestapo? (or “How I Know Iím Doing My Job”)” on ManagingCommunities.com

I like this post just because it’s so true. The topic came to me randomly and it took me an hour or two to write it up. The writing process pulled upon my experience managing communities and being the one that people direct their anger at, when they are told that they are unable to do something.

Q: How often do you leave comments on other people’s blogs?  How do you find their entries in the first place?

I would say on a virtual daily basis. I do most of my blog reading through my feedreader, Bloglines. So, that is how I find the entries.

Q: Tell us a bit about your talk at Blogworld Expo. Topic, key points you’ll cover, etc?

I have a book signing and two panels, all on Sunday, September 21. The book signing is at 10:00 AM PT. After that, the first panel is at 12:15 PM PT and it’s called “How to Deal with Trolls, Spammers and Sock Puppets.” I’ll be joined by Rick Calvert, the founder of Blog World Expo, John Chow of JohnChowDotCom (http://www.johnchow.com) and Jeremy Schoemaker of ShoeMoney (http://www.shoemoney.com). We’ll talk about how to deal with these difficult types of visitors and members. How to view their comments and how to manage them.

The second panel is at 3:00 PM PT and it’s called “Avoiding Disaster: How Not to Use Social Media.” On this one, I’ll be joined by Darren Rowse of ProBlogger (http://www.problogger.net) and b5media (http://www.b5media.com), Lee LeFever of Common Craft (http://www.commoncraft.com) and Jason Falls of Social Media Explorer (http://www.socialmediaexplorer.com) and Doe-Anderson (http://www.doeanderson.com).

I really feel that you learn as much from what not to do and who you don’t want to be, as you do about best practices and examples. So, that’s what this panel will focus on. We’ll talk about ways that you can damage your brand through your actions on social media outlets, such as communities, forums, blogs, social networking sites, social bookmarking and everything in between.

Q: How do you recommend new folk best experience a major conference and expo like Blogworld Expo?

This sounds funny, I guess, since I have a signing and two panels, but don’t get overly caught up in following a schedule and going to panels and being here and there. Mark your must haves and get to them, but for me, the best part of these conferences has been in networking and meeting people. And some of the best networking you do is in the hallways, at the parties, etc. Panels are great, but you don’t want to be running from place to place and forget to actually meet people and network.

I admit that I’m not the most experienced conference attendee, though. This will be just the second tech conference I’ve been to, following this year’s South by Southwest. I attended 1 panel, 1 core conversation and a handful of book readings or portions of them (mainly so that I could see what they were about before I gave mine). And yet, I don’t regret it. I had a great time and I met a lot of people. It was great. I’m looking forward to Blog World Expo being similar.

Q: Easy ones: Mac or PC?  Ipod or Zune?  Iphone or Blackberry?

I use PCs. I use Windows Vista Ultimate on both my desktop and laptop. My MP3 player is actually a Creative Zen Xtra, but I do have an iPod Nano that I received for free, in a giveaway, that I keep plugged into a speaker next to my bed. Cell phone wise, I don’t use one! *gasp*


Thanks for playing our game, Patrick. Hope you had a great experience at Blogworld Expo 2008.

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